Translate:
HomeCo
Home
Countywide Vision
Services A-Z
Services
Visiting
Living
Working
Contacts
Email Subscriptions
E-Subscriptions

Events, Posts, Files and News related to the Community Plan Continuum.

Eight Regional Meetings | October 2017

Download PDF version of the event flyer here .

Open House Events


The County is hosting eight open houses in October:

1. Yucaipa
October 4th | 10 AM to 1 PM

Yucaipa Community Center
34900 Oak Glen Road
Yucaipa, CA 92399

2. Crestline
October 4th | 5 to 8 PM

San Moritz Lodge
24640 San Moritz Drive
Crestline, CA 92325

3. Barstow
October 5th | 4:30 to 7:30 PM

Barstow Senior Citizen Center
555 Melissa Avenue
Barstow, CA 92311

4. Rialto
October 6th | 11 AM to 3 PM

County Behavioral Health Department
850 E. Foothill Blvd
Rialto, CA 92376

5. Ontario
October 10th | 3 to 7 PM

Ontario Senior Center
225 E. B Street
Ontario, CA 91764

6. Joshua Tree
October 11th | 5 to 8 PM

Joshua Tree Community Center
6171 Sunburst Street
Joshua Tree, CA 92252

7. Hesperia
October 12th | 10 AM to 1 PM

Lime Street Community Center
16292 Lime Street
Hesperia, CA 92345

8. Big Bear Lake
October 12th | 5 to 8 PM

Big Bear Valley Senior Center
42651 Big Bear Blvd
Big Bear Lake, CA 92314

 
 
Can’t attend one of these dates? Take the online survey here .

Open House Highlights


At each open house, the County will present progress on the Countywide Plan and discuss your thoughts on a variety of topics including:

  • Land use (current & proposed)
  • Draft Community Plans
  • Public safety & security
  • Economic & social resources
  • Health & wellness
  • Circulation & mobility
  • Natural resources & hazards
  • Public & social services
  • Environmental justice
  • Web-based maps
 

Open House Activities


Each regional open house will feature many ways to participate, including:

  • Complete surveys
  • Fill out comment cards
  • Review the proposed Land Use Plan
  • Review draft Community Plans
  • Explore web-based maps
  • Draw at the kids coloring station
  • Take pictures at the selfie station
 
 
 


These events are part of an ongoing outreach process that has included over 66 community meetings. Thank you for getting involved in improving your community and county!

Draft Detailed Community Plans now available for review!

See the results of your hard work.  Come take a look at this new resource for your community to steer its own course toward a better future.

In 2016 and 2017, over 1,700 people from over 50 communities embarked on a planning process to develop new system of Community Plans.

During 66 workshops, the public identified values, aspirations, ideas for action, and priorities unique to each community area.  The Community Plans include a set of actions that can be initiated by residents, businesses, property owners, local groups, etc. to improve their community.

Click here to download a PDF flyer about the Draft Detailed Community Plans and the public review process.

Draft Community Plans can now be viewed online for the communities listed below. Draft Framework and Foundation Plans will be available by October.

Public Feedback

Thank you for participating in the Community Plan update process!  After viewing your draft community plan, the County welcomes your feedback and comments submitted via:

  • Online through the submittal area on each draft community plan’s webpage
  • Email
  • Attendance at one of the Regional Open Houses scheduled for October 2017 (notice and flyer coming soon)
  • U.S. mail:
    County of San Bernardino
    Land Use Services
    Attn: Suzanne Peterson
    385 North Arrowhead Avenue, 1st Floor
    San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

Draft Lake Arrowhead Communities Plans

  • Introduction
  • Our Community
  • Our Aspirations
  • Our Action Plans
  • Maps & Links

  • Introduction

    Lake Arrowhead

    In 2016, the communities embarked on a planning process to develop a new Community Plan. Three public workshops were held over the course of the year. These workshops, open to any Lake Arrowhead resident or business, addressed strengths and weaknesses of the communities, the communities’ values, and what Lake Arrowhead aspires to be in the future. Plan participants brainstormed areas of focus and actions to help the communities move forward to achieve their aspirations.

    The results are presented as the Public Review Draft Lake Arrowhead Communities Plan through this webpage, including the four additional tabs above.
    Click here for a PDF version of the entire Public Review Draft Lake Arrowhead Communities Plan.

    • The Draft Communities Plan for Public Review

      The County is looking for public comments about this Public Review Draft Communities Plan. You may use the feedback form on this page to submit your comments online — look to the left or scroll down to the bottom depending on your device.

      In addition, you may e-mail comments to LakeArrowheadCP@lus.sbcounty.gov or submit written comments by mail to:

      County of San Bernardino
      Land Use Services Department
      385 N. Arrowhead Ave., 1st Floor
      San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

      This Draft Communities Plan was created by the community members who attended workshops, provided comments online or sent in written comments. It is written in the words of those participating in the public engagement process. Therefore, the communities’ plan retains the voice and future image of the communities presented by the community members participating in the public engagement process.

    • How to Use This Plan

      Purpose and Approach

      Overall, the Community Plans are a guide for communities to create the future character and independent identity, as identified in the workshops with community values and aspirations, through completion of a community action plan. As stated at the community workshops, the new Community Plans replace any existing 2007/2014 Community Plans, with a greater focus on community self-reliance, grass-roots action, and implementation. Goals, policies, land use, and infrastructure decisions will be addressed in the Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan.

      The Community Plan is strategic in nature and provides clear Focus Statements and Action Statements identified by the community that led to creation of an action plan that can be implemented at the grass-roots level within each community. Some actions may require assistance by a County department, but the community will take the lead in moving the action forward, identifying funding or scheduling meetings or requesting information from specific County departments.

      Plan Organization

      The Community Plan is organized into three main sections, the community’s Values, community’s Aspirations, and Action Plans.

      VALUES – Those shared assets, principles, standards, mores and in the judgement of the community, what is important to the lives of its residents and businesses. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

      Community Values are listed under the Our Community tab.

      ASPIRATIONS– A written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Plan is fully implemented. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. It is written as if the community’s desired changes have already occurred. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

      Community Aspirations are listed under the Our Aspirations tab.

      ACTION PLANS– The action plans consist of:

          • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
          • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
          • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

        The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

        Action Plans are listed under the Our Action Plans tab.

        The Plan as a Living Document

        The Community Plan and the Countywide Plan are designed to be web-based plans and therefore will be easily updated. The Community Plan is intended to be championed and implemented by the community. The Focus Statements and Action Statement within the plan were created through public engagement workshops by community participants.

        The plan is meant as a way to organize activities and provide overall direction to move the community forward. The plan should never be considered to be written in stone, but should be malleable as the needs of the community continue to change. Focus Statements and Action Statements should be changed and amended as Action Statements are completed or new priorities take their place.

        The Community should consider reviewing its plan annually to celebrate what was accomplished and make changes to the plan, as necessary, to ensure it is a relevant work plan. Communities should report back to the San Bernardino County Land Use Services Department, Planning Division as they complete actions to ensure their plan is updated online with success stories included on their website and at least annually to ensure their action plans are updated reflecting completed actions. As communities complete their Action Plans, the County will determine when to revisit the community to expand or modify their action plans.

    • Relationship to the Countywide Vision and Countywide Plan

      Relationship to Countywide Vision

      The Community Plan’s values and goals are specific to. However, they are consistent with, build on, and contribute to the Countywide Vision.

      Relationship to Countywide Plan

      In 2010, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors set out to establish a vision for the future of the county as a whole, and subsequently adopted a Countywide Vision in 2011 after two years of input from the community and the county’s 24 cities and towns. Following the adoption of the Countywide Vision, which calls for the creation of a “complete county”, the Board adopted the County paradigm and job statements in 2012.

      In 2015, the County of San Bernardino launched an effort to go further than any county or city has ever gone with a general plan by creating a web-based comprehensive “complete county” plan. General plans are almost always strictly rule books for guiding development and growth. The County’s General Plan, last updated in 2007, will go well beyond a traditional general plan to become a comprehensive Countywide Plan that complements and informs the Countywide Vision by taking into account all services—not just land-use planning—provided by County Government, and the unique values and priorities of each unincorporated community.

      The Countywide Plan serves as a guide for County decision-making, financial planning, and communications. Its web-based format provides a wealth of easily accessible data on how the County operates, and allow independent research using County data and information.

      The Countywide Plan includes:

          • A County Policy Plan, which serves in part as the County’s General Plan for the unincorporated areas and also provides guidance for regional county services. The Policy Plan establishes goals and policies for the entire county as well as specific sub regions and communities.
          • A County Business Plan, which contains governance policies and operational metrics that outline the County’s approach to providing municipal and regional services.
          • A Regional Issues Forum, which is an online resource for sharing information and resources related to issues confronting the entire county.
          • A Community Plans Continuum, which articulates what is important to each Community, and for the most part, would be implemented by the Community. Links will also be provided for maps, goals, and policies in the Policy Plan.

    • Where Did the Goals, Policies, and Land Use Map for My Community’s Plan Go?

      The existing Community Plan content was used in the development of the new draft Community Plan and Countywide Plan. Goals and policies from the existing community plan, as well as proposed land use changes discussed during the community workshops, will be considered for inclusion in the County Policy Plan, a component of the Countywide Plan. The Land Use Map will be adopted as part of the County Policy Plan. The content of the draft Community Plan focuses on those actions identified by the community that the community is willing to take to make desired changes to their community. The County Policy Plan and the Community Plans will both be web-based, with adoption of the Countywide Plan in late 2018.

    • What is the Community Development Toolkit?

      The County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department is creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.





  • Our Community


      Lake Arrowhead

    • Who We Are

      The Lake Arrowhead communities consist of several mountaintop communities where residents enjoy a tranquil, small-town lifestyle and actively seek the protection and enhancement of the natural mountain environment. Although the slower pace is appreciated, outdoor recreation activities and an active lifestyle are also valued. Residents are actively involved in a variety of community service organizations, are well informed, and depend upon their neighbors. Residents and business owners take great pride in the unique tourist identity of the area, and enjoy positive relationships with tourists by understanding their importance to the local economy. Community members support the reuse of existing buildings, infill development, and revitalization to create a vibrant local economy and tourist industry that maintains the area’s economic well-being. Of primary focus is the attraction of families to the area by providing a vibrant local economy that encourages small local and home-based businesses, encouraging preservation of the natural environment, and providing park and recreational facilities and programs for all ages and abilities.

      Strengths and Opportunities

      Community workshops were conducted in each community as part of the engagement process. In addition, input was gathered through the Countywide Plan website. As part of the process, participants defined the strengths of and opportunities for their community. The word cloud below was created using the input provided during the Strengths, Opportunities, Values and Aspirations exercises and served as part of the base information utilized to develop the Focus and Action Statements of the Community Plan. The word cloud quickly informed participants of key issues and focus areas that could be addressed in the plan. The more a word or phrase was articulated, the larger the word appears in the cloud. The full results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats gathered as a part of the engagement process are found in the Community Profile.

      Lake Arrowhead Word Cloud

    • Community Values

      The Values are those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important in the lives of its residents and businesses. A community’s values are an important consideration in shaping its aspirations, focus and actions.

       

      Natural Mountain Environment

      Lake Arrowhead communities residents value the tranquil, small-town lifestyle and natural mountain beauty, including flora/fauna, wildlife, fresh air, clean water, and starry night skies, and proximity to the San Bernardino National Forest.
      High Quality of Life. Lake Arrowhead communities residents value a high quality of life, active lifestyle, and variety of recreation opportunities, while maintaining the slower pace and peacefulness the mountain communities offer.


      Outdoor Recreation

      Lake Arrowhead communities residents value outdoor recreation activities, including Lake Arrowhead, nearby skiing, sledding, snow play, hiking trails, and off-highway vehicles.


      Community Involvement

      Lake Arrowhead communities residents value their communities and are highly active and involved in community service organizations. Residents have a strong sense of community, are informed, and can depend on their neighbors.


      Positive Visitor Relationships

      Lake Arrowhead communities residents value visitors to the community as an important part of the local economy. They enjoy positive relationships with tourists and take great pride in the unique tourist identity of the area.

    • Community Profile

      The community profile is a summary of the social, cultural, economic, and historic dimensions of Lake Arrowhead. It presents data collected through secondary sources to inform future actions. The profile, together with future studies and information gathered from residents highlights essential facets and “tell the story” of the Lake Arrowhead Communities.

      Click here for a PDF version of the complete Communities Profile.




  • Our Aspirations

    Lake Arrowhead Workshop #2

    The Aspirations Statement is a written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Focus Statements and Action Statements are fully implemented. This is a long term view of 10 to 20 years. The Aspirations Statement serves as a foundation for developing Community Focus Statements and Action Statements.


    • 1. Thriving and Protected Natural Mountain Environment

      Residents support protection of the area’s natural environment and mountain character through education and activities, such as community-organized cleanups. Education programs are implemented for residents and visitors to ensure awareness of the importance of the natural environment and understanding of the ways to ensure its protection. The communities also a program to market the area as a unique tourist destination and attract businesses that capitalize on and protect the environment, such as ecotourism.


    • 2. Safe Communities

      Residents and property owners work with each other and the San Bernardino County Fire and Sheriff’s Department to improve safety within the communities. The need for additional services and equipment continues to be monitored, with services and equipment provided as appropriate. The communities also work with first responders in creating better mapping and directional street signs/markings to navigate the communities during times of emergency.


    • 3. Vibrant Local Economy

      Residents create a vibrant local economy and tourist industry that maintains the area’s economic well-being by supporting the reuse of existing buildings, infill development, and revitalization. Growth of small local businesses and home-based businesses are supported and encouraged. Of primary focus was the attraction and retention of families to the area. Parks and recreational facilities and programs are offered for all ages and abilities. The communities work with local employers, community organizations, and schools to market the area to young families.


    • 4. Improved Access and Transportation Alternatives

      Opportunities to reduce vehicular traffic in the area are reviewed, including a local shuttle/trolley system during peak visitor periods, a regional transportation system, and walking/hiking/cycling paths that connect community nodes and the larger mountain areas. Efforts to implement these alternative means of transportation are under way. The communities also work with the County of San Bernardino and neighboring communities to develop alternative and improved access to and through the mountain communities.




  • Our Action Plans

    Action Plans

    Click here for a PDF version of the compiled Public Review Draft Lake Arrowhead Action Plans.

    The Action Plans consist of:

          • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
          • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
          • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

    Focus Statements and Action Statements

    Each Focus Statement is listed below. The Action Statements display under the corresponding Focus Statement. Expanded discussions of each Action Statement are included in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

    The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

    Focus Statements


    • A. Preserve and enhance the unique environmental features of the Lake Arrowhead Communities and surrounding areas

      Action Statements

      A1. Coordinate with the local schools and other organizations to educate youth on the importance of the environment and its protection.

      A2. Identify incentives for landowners to maintain undeveloped property as open space.

      A3. Coordinate with Caltrans to identify opportunities to provide tunnels and wildlife corridors under or over roadways as well as incorporating requirements as part of the development review process.

      A4. Organize community members to participate in the development review process through public hearing meetings and reviewing and commenting on public documents.

      A5. Partner with environmental groups and associations to develop programs, activities, and educational materials that preserve and protect the natural environment.


    • B. Develop and improve parks and recreational facilities and services for all ages

      Action Statements

      B1. Identify recreation needs, including facilities and programs, by working with residents from all age groups and abilities.

      B2. Identify opportunities for joint-use of facilities with the school district to serve recreation needs.

      B3. Coordinate with the San Bernardino County Special Districts to identify improvements at MacKay Park, providing a wider range of age-appropriate facilities, including a senior exercise trail and ballfields.

      B4. Identify opportunities for a variety of recreational activities and amenities such as walking, hiking, horseback riding, biking, off-highway vehicles (OHVs), tennis courts, ballfields, and open space areas.


    • C. Provide quality educational opportunities at all levels

      Action Statements

      C1. Establish partnership for joint use of existing public school infrastructure with universities and junior colleges to provide expanded educational opportunities for residents.

      C2. Investigate the declining enrollment and quality of public schools in the mountain communities through community organizing and involvement.


    • D. Provide a thriving and vibrant local small business environment

      Action Statements

      D1. Encourage local ownership and investment of the Village.

      D2. Coordinate with Caltrans to enhance and change signage on I-215 from “Highland” to “Mountain Resort Communities” or another alternative wording that capitalizes on the mountain areas.

      D3. Establish mountain-wide regional collaborative relationships between employers and high schools and local public or local non-profit junior colleges such as San Bernardino Valley College and Crafton Hills College to offer low-cost credentialing and certification programs to increase educational opportunities for employees to gain job skills.

      D4. Coordinate with the San Bernardino County Economic Development Agency (EDA) and Lake Arrowhead Communities Chamber of Commerce to expand strategies to improve communications with businesses and develop a Business Retention & Expansion (BR&E) program.

      D5. Coordinate with the San Bernardino County Economic Development Agency (EDA) and Lake Arrowhead Communities Chamber of Commerce to establish a marketing plan with incentives to attract new businesses to the area.

      D6. Accommodate permanent residents by developing and implementing a marketing campaign to highlight the values of mountain living for young families focusing on education, family values, community, natural environment, and activities.

      D7. Establish a business appreciation program, including events, webinars, and awards.

      D8. Identify and develop entrepreneurial talent in coordination with existing programs at CSUSB through a coaching program and entrepreneur training program, known as “Economic Gardening”.

      D9. Equip the local Chamber of Commerce to be a one stop shop for help with regulatory permits, financing sources, and serve as ombudsperson with local agencies.

      D10. Partner with the County Economic Development Agency to offer incentive programs for new businesses that move into existing commercial and industrial locations.

      D11. Establish a marketing plan with incentives to encourage home-based businesses.


    • E. Provide economic development opportunities that capitalize on the natural environment, attract visitors, and provide entertainment for residents

      Action Statements

      E1. Establish a marketing strategy to promote the natural environment and associated activities to encourage of ecotourism businesses.

      E2. Investigate opportunities with the Lake Arrowhead Communities Chamber of Commerce, San Bernardino County Special District Department, US Forest Service, and other agencies as appropriate to provide amenities to support visitors to the area such as parking, restrooms, seating areas, open space, trails that connect key nodes/activity centers.

      E3. Encourage obtaining local designation status (or higher) of historic resources.


    • F. Improve resources to support seasonal visitors and tourist activities in the Lake Arrowhead communities

      Action Statements

      F1. Provide dumpsters and signage that encourages proper disposal of trash in high-traffic visitor areas.

      F2. Investigate opportunities to establish designated sledding areas with parking to avoid visitors establishing quasi-sledding and parking areas.

      F3. Provide signage, maps, and other informational materials that identify trails and amenities.

      F4. Provide programs and marketing materials that educate visitors on the natural environment and importance of its protection in order to foster responsible tourist behavior.

      F5. Establish an education campaign specific for visitors of the Deep Creek area regarding the safe and environmentally-sensitive use of off-highway vehicles (OHV) and hiking and snow play activities.

      F6. Provide centralized parking with shuttles and pedestrian paths that connect key commercial and recreational activity areas to reduce vehicle use and trips.

      F7. Partner with the US Forest Service to provide information materials and services focused on hiking trails, fire cutting permits, camping, and associated activities.


    • G. Improve public safety within the Lake Arrowhead communities

      Action Statements

      G1. Establish a neighborhood watch program that can be implemented throughout the communities.

      G2. Encourage community members to participate in the Citizens on Patrol Program coordinated through the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department.

      G3. Partner with the Sheriff’s Department, US Forest Service, San Bernardino County Fire, local safety experts, and insurance companies to educate property owners on securing homes and businesses.

      G4. Advocate with the US Forest Service to increase staffing and enforcement of forest lands.

      G5. Design and promote education materials to help residents understand what constitute potential code violations and how to report illegal dumping activities.

      G6. Advocate and coordinate with the County and emergency service providers to create better maps and directional street signs/markings to assist emergency drivers in navigating the communities.


    • H. Maintain roadway infrastructure and improve traffic flow and vehicle safety within the communities

      Action Statements

      H1. Coordinate with the County to identify needed roadway maintenance associated with tree roots.

      H2. Identify opportunities to improve safety and maintenance of private roads.

      H3. Investigate traffic safety at major intersections and turnouts/cutoffs.

      H4. Advocate with the County and Caltrans to regularly maintain public roadways and drainage infrastructure.


    Action Plan Matrices

    The Action Plan Matrix for each Action Statement listed above can be found in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

    How to Implement the Action Plans

    The Action Plans provide a general organization of the action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement. The Community may want to meet to identify the top three to five priority Action Statements to work on first. Some of these may be those actions that the community believes could be completed quickly and easily. Completion of one Action Statement will provide the community and local groups with the motivation to move forward with another Action Statement.

    Once an Action Statement is selected for implementation, the Community identifies a champion for that Action Statement to initiate activities, identify those responsible for carrying out action steps, identify and secure resources that will be required, and develop a timeline. While suggested champions and action steps are included in the plan document, each community should develop more specific assignments based upon available community resources such as volunteers, community groups and organizations. This step of planning for implementation is an important step necessary to help ensure successful implementation.

    Potential resources are identified for each Action Statement. These may be guides on implementation, case studies of how other communities have implemented similar projects, sources of potential external funding, and County agencies that can provide guidance and advice.

    The Action Plans are Not Set in Stone

    The Action Plans are to be used to guide community actions and are not “set in stone”. Champions and Action Leaders are suggestions, but your community has a better idea of the best Champion for individual actions. The Action process is a general set of tasks that can be modified by the Champion, Action Leaders and/or Action Teams to best fit your community. The community should feel free to make changes and find alternatives for completing actions.

    The Community Development Toolkit

    San Bernardino County Land Use Services is in the process of creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.



  • Material in this section will be added as it is completed with community input. Click on each item for more information and a link to download the material.

    Draft Helendale Community Plan

    • Introduction
    • Our Community
    • Our Aspirations
    • Our Action Plans
    • Maps & Links

    • Introduction

      Helendale

      In 2016, the community embarked on a planning process to develop a new Community Plan. Three public workshops were held over the course of the year. These workshops, open to any Helendale resident or business, addressed strengths and weaknesses of the community, the community’s values, and what Helendale aspires to be in the future. Plan participants brainstormed areas of focus and actions to help the community move forward to achieve its aspirations.

      The results are presented as the Public Review Draft Helendale Community Plan through this webpage, including the four additional tabs above.
      Click here for a PDF version of the entire Public Review Draft Helendale Community Plan.

      • The Draft Community Plan for Public Review

        The County is looking for public comments about this Public Review Draft Community Plan. You may use the feedback form on this page to submit your comments online — look to the left or scroll down to the bottom depending on your device.

        In addition, you may e-mail comments to HelendaleCP@lus.sbcounty.gov or submit written comments by mail to:

        County of San Bernardino
        Land Use Services Department
        385 N. Arrowhead Ave., 1st Floor
        San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

        This Draft Community Plan was created by the community members who attended workshops, provided comments online or sent in written comments. It is written in the words of those participating in the public engagement process. Therefore, the community’s plan retains the voice and future image of the community presented by the community members participating in the public engagement process.

      • How to Use This Plan

        Purpose and Approach

        Overall, the Community Plans are a guide for communities to create the future character and independent identity, as identified in the workshops with community values and aspirations, through completion of a community action plan. As stated at the community workshops, the new Community Plans replace any existing 2007/2014 Community Plans, with a greater focus on community self-reliance, grass-roots action, and implementation. Goals, policies, land use, and infrastructure decisions will be addressed in the Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan.

        The Community Plan is strategic in nature and provides clear Focus Statements and Action Statements identified by the community that led to creation of an action plan that can be implemented at the grass-roots level within each community. Some actions may require assistance by a County department, but the community will take the lead in moving the action forward, identifying funding or scheduling meetings or requesting information from specific County departments.

        Plan Organization

        The Community Plan is organized into three main sections, the community’s Values, community’s Aspirations, and Action Plans.

        VALUES – Those shared assets, principles, standards, mores and in the judgement of the community, what is important to the lives of its residents and businesses. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

        Community Values are listed under the Our Community tab.

        ASPIRATIONS– A written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Plan is fully implemented. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. It is written as if the community’s desired changes have already occurred. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

        Community Aspirations are listed under the Our Aspirations tab.

        ACTION PLANS– The action plans consist of:

            • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
            • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
            • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

          The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

          Action Plans are listed under the Our Action Plans tab.

          The Plan as a Living Document

          The Community Plan and the Countywide Plan are designed to be web-based plans and therefore will be easily updated. The Community Plan is intended to be championed and implemented by the community. The Focus Statements and Action Statement within the plan were created through public engagement workshops by community participants.

          The plan is meant as a way to organize activities and provide overall direction to move the community forward. The plan should never be considered to be written in stone, but should be malleable as the needs of the community continue to change. Focus Statements and Action Statements should be changed and amended as Action Statements are completed or new priorities take their place.

          The Community should consider reviewing its plan annually to celebrate what was accomplished and make changes to the plan, as necessary, to ensure it is a relevant work plan. Communities should report back to the San Bernardino County Land Use Services Department, Planning Division as they complete actions to ensure their plan is updated online with success stories included on their website and at least annually to ensure their action plans are updated reflecting completed actions. As communities complete their Action Plans, the County will determine when to revisit the community to expand or modify their action plans.

      • Relationship to the Countywide Vision and Countywide Plan

        Relationship to Countywide Vision

        The Community Plan’s values and goals are specific to. However, they are consistent with, build on, and contribute to the Countywide Vision.

        Relationship to Countywide Plan

        In 2010, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors set out to establish a vision for the future of the county as a whole, and subsequently adopted a Countywide Vision in 2011 after two years of input from the community and the county’s 24 cities and towns. Following the adoption of the Countywide Vision, which calls for the creation of a “complete county”, the Board adopted the County paradigm and job statements in 2012.

        In 2015, the County of San Bernardino launched an effort to go further than any county or city has ever gone with a general plan by creating a web-based comprehensive “complete county” plan. General plans are almost always strictly rule books for guiding development and growth. The County’s General Plan, last updated in 2007, will go well beyond a traditional general plan to become a comprehensive Countywide Plan that complements and informs the Countywide Vision by taking into account all services—not just land-use planning—provided by County Government, and the unique values and priorities of each unincorporated community.

        The Countywide Plan serves as a guide for County decision-making, financial planning, and communications. Its web-based format provides a wealth of easily accessible data on how the County operates, and allow independent research using County data and information.

        The Countywide Plan includes:

            • A County Policy Plan, which serves in part as the County’s General Plan for the unincorporated areas and also provides guidance for regional county services. The Policy Plan establishes goals and policies for the entire county as well as specific sub regions and communities.
            • A County Business Plan, which contains governance policies and operational metrics that outline the County’s approach to providing municipal and regional services.
            • A Regional Issues Forum, which is an online resource for sharing information and resources related to issues confronting the entire county.
            • A Community Plans Continuum, which articulates what is important to each Community, and for the most part, would be implemented by the Community. Links will also be provided for maps, goals, and policies in the Policy Plan.

      • Where Did the Goals, Policies, and Land Use Map for My Community’s Plan Go?

        The existing Community Plan content was used in the development of the new draft Community Plan and Countywide Plan. Goals and policies from the existing community plan, as well as proposed land use changes discussed during the community workshops, will be considered for inclusion in the County Policy Plan, a component of the Countywide Plan. The Land Use Map will be adopted as part of the County Policy Plan. The content of the draft Community Plan focuses on those actions identified by the community that the community is willing to take to make desired changes to their community. The County Policy Plan and the Community Plans will both be web-based, with adoption of the Countywide Plan in late 2018.

      • What is the Community Development Toolkit?

        The County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department is creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.





    • Our Community

        Helendale Fire Station

      • Who We Are

        Helendale is an independent community with strong community pride. The community values neighborliness, local control, open space, and the unique rural desert lifestyle that only the Mojave Desert can offer. Helendale strives to promote responsible development that protects the natural environment, continue to be a safe and attractive community, expand recreational opportunities to its residents, while improving its commercial and industrial base.

        Strengths and Opportunities

        Community workshops were conducted in each community as part of the engagement process. In addition, input was gathered through the Countywide Plan website. As part of the process, participants defined the strengths of and opportunities for their community. The word cloud below was created using the input provided during the Strengths, Opportunities, Values and Aspirations exercises and served as part of the base information utilized to develop the Focus and Action Statements of the Community Plan. The word cloud quickly informed participants of key issues and focus areas that could be addressed in the plan. The more a word or phrase was articulated, the larger the word appears in the cloud. The full results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats gathered as a part of the engagement process is found in the Community Profile.

        Helendale Word Cloud

      • Community Values

        The Values are those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important in the lives of its residents and businesses. A community’s values are an important consideration in shaping its aspirations, focus and actions.

         

        Rural Desert Lifestyle

        Helendale residents value a rural desert lifestyle with fresh air, a quiet and tranquil atmosphere, a slower pace of life, and a starry night sky.


        Open Space

        Helendale residents value the community’s close proximity to wildlife and open space.


        Community Pride

        Helendale residents value a strong sense of community and residents’ participation in matters impacting the community.


        Friendly Neighborhood Atmosphere

        Helendale residents value friendly neighbors and lending each other a hand.


        Local Control

        Helendale residents value local control over sewer, water, parks, trash, and streetlights through the Silver Lakes Association and the Helendale Community Services District (CSD).

      • Community Profile

        The community profile is a summary of the social, cultural, economic, and historic dimensions of Helendale. It presents data collected through secondary sources to inform future actions. The profile, together with future studies and information gathered from residents highlights essential facets and “tell the story” of the Helendale Community.

        Click here for a PDF version of the complete Community Profile.




    • Our Aspirations

      Helendale Workshop #1

      The Aspirations Statement is a written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Focus Statements and Action Statements are fully implemented. This is a long term view of 10 to 20 years. The Aspirations Statement serves as a foundation for developing Community Focus Statements and Action Statements.


      • 1. Responsible Development

        We have achieved responsible development and living in balance with the natural environment. New development is designed to preserve our rural lifestyle and our values, including neighborliness. This development continues to preserve pristine vistas, the Mojave Desert ecosystem, and our highly valued starry night sky.


      • 2. Safe and Attractive Access to Our Community

        We embrace the community’s location on historic Route 66 (National Trails Highway). Beautification of our gateway roads and development of secondary access points allow safe access in and out of the community, especially for emergency services, in the event that our at-grade railroad crossings are blocked.


      • 3. Expanded Recreational Opportunities

        Community residents, the Helendale Community Services District, and the Silver Lakes Homeowners Association cooperated to expand recreational opportunities. Helendale Park is complete and includes additional activities for all ages. We partner with our local schools to improve after-school programs, and we partner with local organizations to improve youth and adult activities. In addition, we enjoy expanded hiking, walking, and cycling paths that take advantage of the natural beauty of the wash and the Mojave River.


      • 4. A Vibrant Commercial and Industrial Base

        The commercial and industrial businesses within our community grew to provide jobs, additional tax base, and expanded shopping and professional services. The community’s central commercial area has additional restaurants, stores, and professional services such as primary medical care and dental services.




    • Our Action Plans

      Action Plans

      Click here for a PDF version of the compiled Public Review Draft Helendale Action Plans.

      The Action Plans consist of:

            • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
            • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
            • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

      Focus Statements and Action Statements

      Each Focus Statement is listed below. The Action Statements display under the corresponding Focus Statement. Expanded discussions of each Action Statement are included in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

      The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

      Focus Statements


      • A. Improve the overall safety of the community

        Action Statements

        A1. Coordinate with the County to design walkable routes to local schools, Helendale Community Park, and Silver Lakes’ parks to improve pedestrian safety.

        A2. Coordinate with the County to improve safety issues caused by Route 66 tourism on National Trails Highway by advocating for speed limit reductions, potential road improvements in high crash areas, targeted traffic enforcement, and an education program in conjunction with Route 66 tourism groups to educate tourists on road safety and high-risk behaviors caused by driver inattention or distraction.

        A3. Install additional streetlights to residential streets.

        A4. Construct sidewalks along Helendale Road and Shadow Mountain Road.

        A5. Develop a neighborhood watch program.

        A6. Enhance the bridge across the Mojave River on Vista Road to meet minimum ADA criteria for pedestrian access.

        A7. Promote the relationship between the County and the Community Services District by designating a community liaison that communicates the need and desires of Helendale residents to the Board of Supervisors and County agencies.


      • B. Improve the visibility and access to Helendale from Route 66 and Interstate 15

        Action Statements

        B1. Coordinate with the County to design a corridor plan for National Trails Highway that improves aesthetics, provides wayfinding and addresses safety from Oro Grande through Helendale.

        B2. Establish a more visible gateway to Helendale on Vista Road and National Trails Highway to attract tourism traffic to local retail.

        B3. Coordinate with the County to re-evaluate an alternative access to Helendale from Wild Road or Shadow Mountain Road.

        B4. Advocate for the County to re-evaluate an access strategy from Helendale to Interstate 15.

        B5: Coordinate with the County to re-evaluate a grade separated crossing at Shadow Mountain Road.


      • C. Maintain and enhance Helendale’s aesthetic value

        Action Statements

        C1. Expand the desert cleanup program to at least 2 times a year to reduce the overall amount of refuse and litter on undeveloped and public lands within Helendale.

        C2. Design and promote education materials to help residents understand what constitutes potential code violations and how to report illegal dumping activities.

        C3. Design a recycled water system for irrigation and landscaping.


      • D. Attract new development to Helendale while maintaining the existing community character and rural desert lifestyle

        Action Statements

        D1. Coordinate with the San Bernardino County Economic Development Agency (EDA) to market available properties for industrial and commercial development.

        D2. Promote the San Bernardino County EDA Business Services website and the California Businesses Portal to business prospects and existing businesses for potential incentives and programs available.

        D3. Establish a local Design Committee to provide advisory input to the County on land development matters.

        D4. Develop stronger coordination on planning between the Silver Lakes HOA, Helendale Community Services District and the County.

        D5. Coordinate with the CSD and incumbent utilities, such as Frontier, to provide higher speed internet access for Helendale residents including broadband internet (20Mbps or higher) and public hotspots.

        D6. Collaborate with the U.S. Postal Service to improve service at the local post office.


      • E. Improve open space and recreational opportunities for Helendale residents

        Action Statements

        E1. Continue the development of, and expand upon, a parks and recreation program that is for all Helendale residents, including completing development of Helendale Community Park.

        E2. Establish more walking and multi-use trails within the community including areas such as the wash and the Mojave River.

        E3. Enhance recreation programs for youth as well as programs for life-long learning.

        E4. Create a little league park and practice fields.

        E5. Establish more family-friendly programming such as “Movies in the Park”.

        E6. Construct a community gym with workout facilities and an indoor pool.

        E7. Enhance the existing Dog Park.

        E8. Coordinate with the Helendale School District on a joint use agreement in order to expand before and after school activities for youth.

        E9. Establish a public access computer center with internet access.


      Action Plan Matrices

      The Action Plan Matrix for each Action Statement listed above can be found in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

      How to Implement the Action Plans

      The Action Plans provide a general organization of the action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement. The Community may want to meet to identify the top three to five priority Action Statements to work on first. Some of these may be those actions that the community believes could be completed quickly and easily. Completion of one Action Statement will provide the community and local groups with the motivation to move forward with another Action Statement.

      Once an Action Statement is selected for implementation, the Community identifies a champion for that Action Statement to initiate activities, identify those responsible for carrying out action steps, identify and secure resources that will be required, and develop a timeline. While suggested champions and action steps are included in the plan document, each community should develop more specific assignments based upon available community resources such as volunteers, community groups and organizations. This step of planning for implementation is an important step necessary to help ensure successful implementation.

      Potential resources are identified for each Action Statement. These may be guides on implementation, case studies of how other communities have implemented similar projects, sources of potential external funding, and County agencies that can provide guidance and advice.

      The Action Plans are Not Set in Stone

      The Action Plans are to be used to guide community actions and are not “set in stone”. Champions and Action Leaders are suggestions, but your community has a better idea of the best Champion for individual actions. The Action process is a general set of tasks that can be modified by the Champion, Action Leaders and/or Action Teams to best fit your community. The community should feel free to make changes and find alternatives for completing actions.

      The Community Development Toolkit

      San Bernardino County Land Use Services is in the process of creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.



    • Material in this section will be added as it is completed with community input. Click on each item for more information and a link to download the material.

      Draft Crest Forest Communities Plan

      • Introduction
      • Our Community
      • Our Aspirations
      • Our Action Plans
      • Maps & Links

      • Introduction

        Crest Forest

        In 2016, the communities embarked on a planning process to develop a new Community Plan. Three public workshops were held over the course of the year. These workshops, open to any Crest Forest resident or business, addressed strengths and weaknesses of the communities, the communities’ values, and what Crest Forest aspires to be in the future. Plan participants brainstormed areas of focus and actions to help the communities move forward to achieve their aspirations.

        The results are presented as the Public Review Draft Crest Forest Communities Plan through this webpage, including the four additional tabs above.
        Click here for a PDF version of the entire Public Review Draft Crest Forest Communities Plan.

        • The Draft Communities Plan for Public Review

          The County is looking for public comments about this Public Review Draft Communities Plan. You may use the feedback form on this page to submit your comments online — look to the left or scroll down to the bottom depending on your device.

          In addition, you may e-mail comments to CrestForestCP@lus.sbcounty.gov or submit written comments by mail to:

          County of San Bernardino
          Land Use Services Department
          385 N. Arrowhead Ave., 1st Floor
          San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

          This Draft Communities Plan was created by the community members who attended workshops, provided comments online or sent in written comments. It is written in the words of those participating in the public engagement process. Therefore, the communities’ plan retains the voice and future image of the communities presented by the community members participating in the public engagement process.

        • How to Use This Plan

          Purpose and Approach

          Overall, the Community Plans are a guide for communities to create the future character and independent identity, as identified in the workshops with community values and aspirations, through completion of a community action plan. As stated at the community workshops, the new Community Plans replace any existing 2007/2014 Community Plans, with a greater focus on community self-reliance, grass-roots action, and implementation. Goals, policies, land use, and infrastructure decisions will be addressed in the Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan.

          The Community Plan is strategic in nature and provides clear Focus Statements and Action Statements identified by the community that led to creation of an action plan that can be implemented at the grass-roots level within each community. Some actions may require assistance by a County department, but the community will take the lead in moving the action forward, identifying funding or scheduling meetings or requesting information from specific County departments.

          Plan Organization

          The Community Plan is organized into three main sections, the community’s Values, community’s Aspirations, and Action Plans.

          VALUES – Those shared assets, principles, standards, mores and in the judgement of the community, what is important to the lives of its residents and businesses. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

          Community Values are listed under the Our Community tab.

          ASPIRATIONS– A written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Plan is fully implemented. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. It is written as if the community’s desired changes have already occurred. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

          Community Aspirations are listed under the Our Aspirations tab.

          ACTION PLANS– The action plans consist of:

              • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
              • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
              • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

            The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

            Action Plans are listed under the Our Action Plans tab.

            The Plan as a Living Document

            The Community Plan and the Countywide Plan are designed to be web-based plans and therefore will be easily updated. The Community Plan is intended to be championed and implemented by the community. The Focus Statements and Action Statement within the plan were created through public engagement workshops by community participants.

            The plan is meant as a way to organize activities and provide overall direction to move the community forward. The plan should never be considered to be written in stone, but should be malleable as the needs of the community continue to change. Focus Statements and Action Statements should be changed and amended as Action Statements are completed or new priorities take their place.

            The Community should consider reviewing its plan annually to celebrate what was accomplished and make changes to the plan, as necessary, to ensure it is a relevant work plan. Communities should report back to the San Bernardino County Land Use Services Department, Planning Division as they complete actions to ensure their plan is updated online with success stories included on their website and at least annually to ensure their action plans are updated reflecting completed actions. As communities complete their Action Plans, the County will determine when to revisit the community to expand or modify their action plans.

        • Relationship to the Countywide Vision and Countywide Plan

          Relationship to Countywide Vision

          The Community Plan’s values and goals are specific to. However, they are consistent with, build on, and contribute to the Countywide Vision.

          Relationship to Countywide Plan

          In 2010, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors set out to establish a vision for the future of the county as a whole, and subsequently adopted a Countywide Vision in 2011 after two years of input from the community and the county’s 24 cities and towns. Following the adoption of the Countywide Vision, which calls for the creation of a “complete county”, the Board adopted the County paradigm and job statements in 2012.

          In 2015, the County of San Bernardino launched an effort to go further than any county or city has ever gone with a general plan by creating a web-based comprehensive “complete county” plan. General plans are almost always strictly rule books for guiding development and growth. The County’s General Plan, last updated in 2007, will go well beyond a traditional general plan to become a comprehensive Countywide Plan that complements and informs the Countywide Vision by taking into account all services—not just land-use planning—provided by County Government, and the unique values and priorities of each unincorporated community.

          The Countywide Plan serves as a guide for County decision-making, financial planning, and communications. Its web-based format provides a wealth of easily accessible data on how the County operates, and allow independent research using County data and information.

          The Countywide Plan includes:

              • A County Policy Plan, which serves in part as the County’s General Plan for the unincorporated areas and also provides guidance for regional county services. The Policy Plan establishes goals and policies for the entire county as well as specific sub regions and communities.
              • A County Business Plan, which contains governance policies and operational metrics that outline the County’s approach to providing municipal and regional services.
              • A Regional Issues Forum, which is an online resource for sharing information and resources related to issues confronting the entire county.
              • A Community Plans Continuum, which articulates what is important to each Community, and for the most part, would be implemented by the Community. Links will also be provided for maps, goals, and policies in the Policy Plan.

        • Where Did the Goals, Policies, and Land Use Map for My Community’s Plan Go?

          The existing Community Plan content was used in the development of the new draft Community Plan and Countywide Plan. Goals and policies from the existing community plan, as well as proposed land use changes discussed during the community workshops, will be considered for inclusion in the County Policy Plan, a component of the Countywide Plan. The Land Use Map will be adopted as part of the County Policy Plan. The content of the draft Community Plan focuses on those actions identified by the community that the community is willing to take to make desired changes to their community. The County Policy Plan and the Community Plans will both be web-based, with adoption of the Countywide Plan in late 2018.

        • What is the Community Development Toolkit?

          The County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department is creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.





      • Our Community

          Lake Gregory Education Center

        • Who We Are

          The Crest Forest communities consist of several small mountaintop communities where residents enjoy a slower pace of living and neighbors work together to foster a safe environment for families. The Crest Forest communities maintain a strong connection to the natural environment and value its preservation and enhancement, as well as the tourism and recreation opportunities it provides. Community members look to build upon their neighborly communities and promote them as a desirable place to raise a family by attracting full-time families with high quality educational opportunities at all levels, a strong business environment, enhanced natural environment with recreational facilities and activities, and improved public safety.

          Strengths and Opportunities

          Community workshops were conducted in each community as part of the engagement process. In addition, input was gathered through the Countywide Plan website. As part of the process, participants defined the strengths of and opportunities for their community. The word cloud below was created using the input provided during the Strengths, Opportunities, Values and Aspirations exercises and served as part of the base information utilized to develop the Focus and Action Statements of the Community Plan. The word cloud quickly informed participants of key issues and focus areas that could be addressed in the plan. The more a word or phrase was articulated, the larger the word appears in the cloud. The full results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats gathered as a part of the engagement process is found in the Community Profile.

          Crest Forest Word Cloud

        • Community Values

          The Values are those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important in the lives of its residents and businesses. A community’s values are an important consideration in shaping its aspirations, focus and actions.

           

          Natural Environment

          Crest Forest communities’ residents value their strong connection to the surrounding natural environment and take great pride in all of its elements, including the beauty and tranquility of the mountains, the abundance of plant and wildlife habitats, starry night skies, and fresh air.


          Outdoor Recreational Opportunities

          Crest Forest communities’ residents value outdoor recreation activities, including Lake Gregory; skiing, sledding, and snow play; walking/hiking trails, and access to off-highway vehicle areas that draw in visitors and are a source of pride and entertainment for residents.


          Independence and Small Town Community

          Crest Forest communities’ residents value their strong independence and the friendliness and involvement of residents, where neighbors know and help each other and work together to foster a safe environment for families.


          Local Living and Tourism

          Crest Forest communities’ residents value tourism and the financial benefits it brings to the communities. They cherish the small-town mountain character of their communities and work together to protect and enhance the natural resources of the area while supporting tourism.

        • Community Profile

          The community profile is a summary of the social, cultural, economic, and historic dimensions of Crest Forest. It presents data collected through secondary sources to inform future actions. The profile, together with future studies and information gathered from residents highlights essential facets and “tell the story” of the Crest Forest Communities.

          Click here for a PDF version of the complete Community Profile.




      • Our Aspirations

        Crest Forest Workshop #3

        The Aspirations Statement is a written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Focus Statements and Action Statements are fully implemented. This is a long term view of 10 to 20 years. The Aspirations Statement serves as a foundation for developing Community Focus Statements and Action Statements.


        • 1. Preserved Natural Environment and Quality of Life

          The quality of mountain life and the protection of the natural environment are critical to the Crest Forest communities. Residents and businesses continue to ensure that the natural environment is protected and enhanced and free of unsightly trash and litter. Community members actively participate in planning and development activities within the communities through participation in public meetings and support of development standards that maintain the mountain character and protect the natural environment.


        • 2. Strong Neighborly Communities That Attract Families

          Residents build on their strong neighborly communities by attracting full-time families with high quality education opportunities at all levels, quality employment opportunities, a strong business environment, and improved safety. Community groups, businesses, and local schools work together to improve and promote the Crest Forest communities as a desirable place to raise a family.


        • 3. Enhanced Recreational Facilities and Activities

          Our community works to expand affordable and accessible recreational facilities and activities for a variety of ages and abilities. Residents coordinate with the County and the Rim of the World Recreation and Park District to provide facilities and programming that are affordable and meet the needs of current and future residents. The communities also continue to explore opportunities for the joint use of facilities and taken advantage of unused spaces when possible.


        • 4. Improved Access and Transportation Options

          The communities work with the County of San Bernardino to develop alternative and improved access to and through the Crest Forest communities. Opportunities to reduce vehicular traffic in the area are explored, including a local shuttle/trolley system during peak visitor periods, a regional transportation system, and walking/hiking/cycling paths that connect community nodes. Efforts to implement these alternative means of transportation are implemented or determined to not be possible within the communities at this time.


        • 5. High Quality Education

          Residents seek out opportunities to improve primary and secondary education in the mountain communities in a widely supported effort to enhance the local school system. The communities work directly with local schools to foster a positive and collaborative relationship that prioritizes the needs of youth.


        • 6. Strong Business Environment

          Residents continue to support home-grown businesses and desire high quality employment opportunities within the mountain communities. The local Chamber of Commerce provides marketing activities that draw businesses and tourists to the area.




      • Our Action Plans

        Action Plans

        Click here for a PDF version of the compiled Public Review Draft Crest Forest Action Plans.

        The Action Plans consist of:

              • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
              • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
              • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

        Focus Statements and Action Statements

        Each Focus Statement is listed below. The Action Statements display under the corresponding Focus Statement. Expanded discussions of each Action Statement are included in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

        The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

        Focus Statements


        • A. Provide a unified downtown area that is active and thriving

          Action Statements

          A1. Provide additional public amenities such as restrooms, seating areas, open space areas, and lighted pedestrian paths, walkways, and crosswalks in the Lake Drive area.

          A2. Install improved lighting in public spaces to promote activity and deter crime.

          A3. Encourage property owners to maintain and improve their properties (e.g. new paint, façade improvements, trash/debris clean-up).

          A4. Construct sidewalks and additional or improved parking, to enhance safety and efficiency in business areas.

          A5. Coordinate and implement a clean-up program for the downtown/business district areas. Collaborate with the County to establish a consistent/compatible design theme for the downtown/business district areas.

          A6. Collaborate with the County to establish a consistent/compatible design theme for the downtown/business district areas.


        • B. Develop and improve parks and recreational facilities and services for all ages

          Action Statements

          B1. Identify recreation needs, including facilities and programs, by working with residents from all age groups and abilities.

          B2. Identify opportunities for joint-use of underused and vacant facilities to serve recreation needs.

          B3. Identify opportunities to incorporate bike trails within the communities.

          B4. Host family-friendly activities/events such as movie nights at Lake Gregory.

          B5: Identify centralized open space/community gathering areas for programming of community events.

          B6. Encourage locally-sponsored events by advocating with the County for a simplified and streamlined permit process.


        • C. Create affordable outdoor recreation activities that capitalize on the natural environment, attract visitors, and provide entertainment for residents while also reducing the associated impacts to the communities

          Action Statements

          C1. Provide dumpsters and signage that encourages property disposal of trash in high-traffic visitor areas.

          C2. Investigate opportunities to establish designated sledding areas with parking to avoid visitors establishing undesignated sledding and parking areas.

          C3. Provide signage, maps, and other informational materials that identify trails and amenities.

          C4. Develop programs and marketing materials that educate visitors on the natural environment and importance of its protection in order to foster responsible tourist behavior.

          C5. Encourage the establishment of ecotourism businesses.

          C6. Establish an annual Arts and Music Festival while supporting arts and music programs.


        • D. Provide a thriving and vibrant local small business environment

          Action Statements

          D1. Attract and retain permanent residents by developing and implementing a marketing campaign to highlight the values of mountain living for young families focusing on education, family values, community, natural environment, and activities.

          D2. Establish a marketing plan that focuses on the natural environment and existing tourist attractions and amenities, such as Lake Gregory Regional Park.

          D3. Establish a marketing plan with incentives to attract new businesses to the area.

          D4. Establish a marketing plan with incentives to encourage home-based businesses.

          D5. Establish regional collaborative relationships mountain-wide between employers and high schools and local public or local non-profit junior colleges such as San Bernardino Valley College and Crafton Hills College to offer low-cost credentialing and certification programs to increase educational opportunities for employees to gain job skills.

          D6. Initiate strategies to improve communications with business and develop a Business Retention & Expansion (BR&E) program.

          D7. Establish a business appreciation program, including events, webinars, and awards.

          D8. Identify and develop entrepreneurial talent in coordination with existing programs at California State University San Bernardino (CSUSB) through a coaching program and entrepreneur training program, known as “Economic Gardening”.

          D9. Equip the local Chamber of Commerce to be a one stop shop for help with regulatory permits, financing sources, and serve as ombudsperson with local agencies.


        • E. Improve public safety

          Action Statements

          E1. Establish a neighborhood watch program that can be implemented throughout the communities.

          E2. Encourage community members to participate in the Citizens Patrol Program coordinated through the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department.

          E3. Partner with the San Bernardino County Sheriff Department, United States Forest Service, San Bernardino County Fire, local safety experts, and insurance companies to educate property owners on securing homes and businesses.

          E4. Design and promote materials to educate about identifying and reporting illegal dumping activities.

          E5. Identify infrastructure improvements that would increase and improve access within and between the communities.


        • F. Provide quality education opportunities at all levels

          Action Statements

          F1. Establish mountain-wide partnerships for joint use of existing Public School infrastructure and junior colleges to provide expanded educational opportunities for residents.

          F2. Investigate the declining enrollment and quality of public schools for the mountain communities through community organizing and involvement that fosters dialogue and collaboration with the local schools.


        Action Plan Matrices

        The Action Plan Matrix for each Action Statement listed above can be found in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

        How to Implement the Action Plans

        The Action Plans provide a general organization of the action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement. The Community may want to meet to identify the top three to five priority Action Statements to work on first. Some of these may be those actions that the community believes could be completed quickly and easily. Completion of one Action Statement will provide the community and local groups with the motivation to move forward with another Action Statement.

        Once an Action Statement is selected for implementation, the Community identifies a champion for that Action Statement to initiate activities, identify those responsible for carrying out action steps, identify and secure resources that will be required, and develop a timeline. While suggested champions and action steps are included in the plan document, each community should develop more specific assignments based upon available community resources such as volunteers, community groups and organizations. This step of planning for implementation is an important step necessary to help ensure successful implementation.

        Potential resources are identified for each Action Statement. These may be guides on implementation, case studies of how other communities have implemented similar projects, sources of potential external funding, and County agencies that can provide guidance and advice.

        The Action Plans are Not Set in Stone

        The Action Plans are to be used to guide community actions and are not “set in stone”. Champions and Action Leaders are suggestions, but your community has a better idea of the best Champion for individual actions. The Action process is a general set of tasks that can be modified by the Champion, Action Leaders and/or Action Teams to best fit your community. The community should feel free to make changes and find alternatives for completing actions.

        The Community Development Toolkit

        San Bernardino County Land Use Services is in the process of creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.



      • Material in this section will be added as it is completed with community input. Click on each item for more information and a link to download the material.

        Draft Phelan/Piñon Hills Community Plan

        • Introduction
        • Our Community
        • Our Aspirations
        • Our Action Plans
        • Maps & Links

        • Introduction

          Phelan/Pinon Hills

          In 2016, the community embarked on a planning process to develop a new Community Plan. Three public workshops were held over the course of the year. These workshops, open to any Phelan Piñon Hills resident or business, addressed strengths and weaknesses of the community, the community’s values, and what Phelan Piñon Hills aspires to be in the future. Plan participants brainstormed areas of focus and actions to help the community move forward to achieve its aspirations.
           
          The results are presented as the Public Review Draft Phelan Piñon Hills Community Plan through this webpage, including the four additional tabs above.
           
          Click here for a PDF version of the entire Public Review Draft Phelan Piñon Hills Community Plan.

          • The Draft Community Plan for Public Review

            The County is looking for public comments about this Public Review Draft Community Plan. You may use the feedback form on this page to submit your comments online — look to the left or scroll down to the bottom depending on your device.

            In addition, you may e-mail comments to PhelanPinonHillsCP@lus.sbcounty.gov or submit written comments by mail to:

            County of San Bernardino
            Land Use Services Department
            385 N. Arrowhead Ave., 1st Floor
            San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

            This Draft Community Plan was created by the community members who attended workshops, provided comments online or sent in written comments. It is written in the words of those participating in the public engagement process. Therefore, the communitiy’s plan retains the voice and future image of the community presented by the community members participating in the public engagement process.

          • How to Use This Plan

            Purpose and Approach

            Overall, the Community Plans are a guide for communities to create the future character and independent identity, as identified in the workshops with community values and aspirations, through completion of a community action plan. As stated at the community workshops, the new Community Plans replace any existing 2007/2014 Community Plans, with a greater focus on community self-reliance, grass-roots action, and implementation. Goals, policies, land use, and infrastructure decisions will be addressed in the Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan.

            The Community Plan is strategic in nature and provides clear Focus Statements and Action Statements identified by the community that led to creation of an action plan that can be implemented at the grass-roots level within each community. Some actions may require assistance by a County department, but the community will take the lead in moving the action forward, identifying funding or scheduling meetings or requesting information from specific County departments.

            Plan Organization

            The Community Plan is organized into three main sections, the community’s Values, community’s Aspirations, and Action Plans.

            VALUES – Those shared assets, principles, standards, mores and in the judgement of the community, what is important to the lives of its residents and businesses. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

            Community Values are listed under the Our Community tab.

            ASPIRATIONS– A written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Plan is fully implemented. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. It is written as if the community’s desired changes have already occurred. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

            Community Aspirations are listed under the Our Aspirations tab.

            ACTION PLANS– The action plans consist of:

                • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

              The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

              Action Plans are listed under the Our Action Plans tab.

              The Plan as a Living Document

              The Community Plan and the Countywide Plan are designed to be web-based plans and therefore will be easily updated. The Community Plan is intended to be championed and implemented by the community. The Focus Statements and Action Statement within the plan were created through public engagement workshops by community participants.

              The plan is meant as a way to organize activities and provide overall direction to move the community forward. The plan should never be considered to be written in stone, but should be malleable as the needs of the community continue to change. Focus Statements and Action Statements should be changed and amended as Action Statements are completed or new priorities take their place.

              The Community should consider reviewing its plan annually to celebrate what was accomplished and make changes to the plan, as necessary, to ensure it is a relevant work plan. Communities should report back to the San Bernardino County Land Use Services Department, Planning Division as they complete actions to ensure their plan is updated online with success stories included on their website and at least annually to ensure their action plans are updated reflecting completed actions. As communities complete their Action Plans, the County will determine when to revisit the community to expand or modify their action plans.

          • Relationship to the Countywide Vision and Countywide Plan

            Relationship to Countywide Vision

            The Community Plan’s values and goals are specific to. However, they are consistent with, build on, and contribute to the Countywide Vision.

            Relationship to Countywide Plan

            In 2010, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors set out to establish a vision for the future of the county as a whole, and subsequently adopted a Countywide Vision in 2011 after two years of input from the community and the county’s 24 cities and towns. Following the adoption of the Countywide Vision, which calls for the creation of a “complete county”, the Board adopted the County paradigm and job statements in 2012.

            In 2015, the County of San Bernardino launched an effort to go further than any county or city has ever gone with a general plan by creating a web-based comprehensive “complete county” plan. General plans are almost always strictly rule books for guiding development and growth. The County’s General Plan, last updated in 2007, will go well beyond a traditional general plan to become a comprehensive Countywide Plan that complements and informs the Countywide Vision by taking into account all services—not just land-use planning—provided by County Government, and the unique values and priorities of each unincorporated community.

            The Countywide Plan serves as a guide for County decision-making, financial planning, and communications. Its web-based format provides a wealth of easily accessible data on how the County operates, and allow independent research using County data and information.

            The Countywide Plan includes:

                • A County Policy Plan, which serves in part as the County’s General Plan for the unincorporated areas and also provides guidance for regional county services. The Policy Plan establishes goals and policies for the entire county as well as specific sub regions and communities.
                • A County Business Plan, which contains governance policies and operational metrics that outline the County’s approach to providing municipal and regional services.
                • A Regional Issues Forum, which is an online resource for sharing information and resources related to issues confronting the entire county.
                • A Community Plans Continuum, which articulates what is important to each Community, and for the most part, would be implemented by the Community. Links will also be provided for maps, goals, and policies in the Policy Plan.

          • Where Did the Goals, Policies, and Land Use Map for My Community’s Plan Go?

            The existing Community Plan content was used in the development of the new draft Community Plan and Countywide Plan. Goals and policies from the existing community plan, as well as proposed land use changes discussed during the community workshops, will be considered for inclusion in the County Policy Plan, a component of the Countywide Plan. The Land Use Map will be adopted as part of the County Policy Plan. The content of the draft Community Plan focuses on those actions identified by the community that the community is willing to take to make desired changes to their community. The County Policy Plan and the Community Plans will both be web-based, with adoption of the Countywide Plan in late 2018.

          • What is the Community Development Toolkit?

            The County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department is creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.





        • Our Community


            Phelan / Pinon Hills

          • Who We Are

            Phelan Piñon Hills has a strong sense of community identity. Phelan Piñon Hills values the preservation of the natural equestrian environment and the safe small-town community feel, with unhindered views and the cooperation of a rural community to guide its own future. The community strives to preserve the natural environment and small-town feel, make needed infrastructure improvements, and build upon local decision-making processes.

            Strengths and Opportunities

            Community workshops were conducted in each community as part of the engagement process. In addition, input was gathered through the Countywide Plan website. As part of the process, participants defined the strengths of and opportunities for their community. The word cloud below was created using the input provided during the Strengths, Opportunities, Values and Aspirations exercises and served as part of the base information utilized to develop the Focus and Action Statements of the Community Plan. The word cloud quickly informed participants of key issues and focus areas that could be addressed in the plan. The more a word or phrase was articulated, the larger the word appears in the cloud. The full results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats gathered as a part of the engagement process are found in the Community Profile.

            Phelan Piñon Hills Word Cloud

          • Community Values

            The Values are those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important in the lives of its residents and businesses. A community’s values are an important consideration in shaping its aspirations, focus and actions.

             

            Proximity to Nature

            Phelan Piñon Hills residents value the community’s open space and the close proximity to nature.


            Agricultural Roots

            Phelan Piñon Hills residents value the historic roots and continued practices of animal keeping, gardening, and agriculture within the community.


            Unhindered Views

            Phelan Piñon Hills residents value unhindered views of sunsets and the stars.


            Health and Safety

            Phelan Piñon Hills residents value community safety, health, and the peaceful nature of the area.


            Community Culture

            Phelan Piñon Hills residents value the friendliness, independence, and cooperation of a rural community that guides its own future.

          • Community Profile

            The community profile is a summary of the social, cultural, economic, and historic dimensions of Phelan Piñon Hills. It presents data collected through secondary sources to inform future actions. The profile, together with future studies and information gathered from residents highlights essential facets and “tell the story” of the Phelan Piñon Hills Community.

            Click here for a PDF version of the complete Community Profile.




        • Our Aspirations

          Phelan/Pinon Hills Workshop #1

          The Aspirations Statement is a written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Focus Statements and Action Statements are fully implemented. This is a long term view of 10 to 20 years. The Aspirations Statement serves as a foundation for developing Community Focus Statements and Action Statements.


          • 1. Preservation of the Natural Environment

            The rural natural environment is one of the unique and defining characteristics of our community, and programs are in place to ensure it is preserved for the enjoyment of future generations. Local community organizations organize cleanup and educational programs focused on teaching homeowners and visitors how to properly respect the surrounding environment.


          • 2. Small-Town Community Feel

            Our community enjoys a variety of annual community events organized by local businesses and organizations that bring the community together and help us to continue to build a sense of pride in the Phelan and Piñon Hills areas. We enjoy the small-town community feel of the area and safeguard it through adoption of design guidelines to ensure that future development will continue to enhance the local community culture.


          • 3. Community Safety

            Phelan and Piñon Hills residents coordinate with the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department to organize training sessions on issues concerning safety in the area. Community members created educational materials in coordination with the County Code Enforcement Division on identifying and notifying potential code enforcement issues to create a cleaner and safer community.


          • 4. Infrastructure Improvements

            Phelan and Piñon Hills support minor infrastructure improvements in order to improve the quality of life for residents and visitors. A local committee provides input on all improvements, including street paving, sidewalks, and recreational trails. The committee’s primary responsibility is to ensure that all improvements are in keeping with the rural feel of the community. The infrastructure enhancements, while minimal, have improved safety and accessibility throughout the community.


          • 5. Local Decision-Making

            Our community collaborates with the County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department and develops educational materials to help residents to understand the opportunities to provide meaningful input in many of the decision-making processes within the communities. This practice results in projects that are welcomed as part of the community and fosters a better relationship between the community and the County. Additionally, Phelan and Piñon Hills residents feel a greater sense of local guidance in matters that impact their day-to-day lives.




        • Our Action Plans

          Action Plans

          Click here for a PDF version of the compiled Public Review Draft Phelan Piñon Hills Action Plans.

          The Action Plans consist of:

                • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

          Focus Statements and Action Statements

          Each Focus Statement is listed below. The Action Statements display under the corresponding Focus Statement. Expanded discussions of each Action Statement are included in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

          The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

          Focus Statements


          • A. Celebrate and maintain the rural character of Phelan Piñon Hills

            Action Statements

            A1. Establish an educational program to educate community members on private-property lighting that is dark skies compliant.

            A2. Establish programs for organized livestock education for community members.


          • B. Encourage commercial and light industrial uses in Phelan Piñon Hills

            Action Statements

            B1. Encourage coordination between the San Bernardino County Economic Development Agency (EDA) and the Phelan and Piñon Hills Chambers of Commerce to link communications with existing businesses to the County’s business retention and expansion program.

            B2. Encourage more retail and service uses within the existing commercial zones by regularly updating the San Bernardino County Economic Development Agency (EDA) on local available sites.

            B3. Promote the CalGOLD and San Bernardino County Economic Development Agency (EDA) websites to local business for the latest information and assistance on business incentives, permit assistance, and training programs.

            B4. Coordinate with the Phelan and Piñon Hills Chambers of Commerce to develop a business appreciation program, including events, webinars, and awards in addition to the referral program and visibility services the Chambers already provide.

            B5. Enhance coordination between the Phelan Chamber of Commerce and the Piñon Hills Chamber of Commerce to be a one-stop shop for help with regulatory permits and financing sources and to serve as an ombudsperson with local agencies.


          • C. Preserve the historic treasures within the community for future generations

            Action Statements

            C1. Identify and preserve historic and current assets in the community.

            C2. Construct community monuments along historic trails and within the community that can be sponsored by business and individuals.

            C3. Partner with local schools to sponsor student art contests for historic monument and trail wayfinding signage.


          • D. Enhance public safety by improving communication and coordination with law enforcement

            Action Statements

            D1. Establish an open forum with the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department (e.g., community open talk night, “Coffee with a Cop”) to discuss local law enforcement issues.

            D2. Establish new and enhance existing neighborhood watch programs that can be implemented and replicated throughout the communities.

            D3. Coordinate with the Sheriff’s Department to educate the community on the existing policing program.

            D4. Partner with the Sheriff’s Department, Cal Fire, local safety experts, and insurance companies to educate property owners on securing homes and businesses.

            D5. Enhance the enforcement programs for illegal use of off-highway vehicles (OHVs) on public and private roads.

            D6. Educate off-highway vehicles (OHV) enthusiasts on local OHV trails and area to keep sand rails and OHVs off private roads.


          • E. Create or provide a cost-effective approach to developing equestrian trails and trails for non-motorized vehicles

            Action Statements

            E1. Establish a community equestrian center and park areas in coordination with existing local equestrian groups.

            E2. Protect and develop equestrian, walking, bicycle, and multi-use trails using dedicated easements (utility and drainage).


          • F. Increase community involvement in community beautification and social cohesion

            Action Statements

            F1. Partner with local recycling companies to develop and expand programs and incentives for hazardous waste and large item pickup and recycling to discourage the dumping of tires, old furniture, and other large items.

            F2. Establish a community cleanup program utilizing local youth organizations to clean up trash, debris, weeds, and illegal dump piles in Phelan and Piñon Hills at least two times a year.

            F3. Encourage citizen involvement in county government and the state legislature.

            F4. Coordinate with youth and cultural organizations to offer programs and activities in Phelan Piñon Hills.

            F5. Establish a multifunctional space to be used by the youth and the community.


          • G. Improve traffic flow and vehicular safety

            Action Statements

            G1. Install arterial roadway improvements with asphalt paving, curbs, gutters, and sidewalks.

            G2. Investigate traffic safety at major intersections and in areas susceptible to vehicle/pedestrian conflict in conjunction with a Safe Routes to School Program.


          Action Plan Matrices

          The Action Plan Matrix for each Action Statement listed above can be found in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

          How to Implement the Action Plans

          The Action Plans provide a general organization of the action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement. The Community may want to meet to identify the top three to five priority Action Statements to work on first. Some of these may be those actions that the community believes could be completed quickly and easily. Completion of one Action Statement will provide the community and local groups with the motivation to move forward with another Action Statement.

          Once an Action Statement is selected for implementation, the Community identifies a champion for that Action Statement to initiate activities, identify those responsible for carrying out action steps, identify and secure resources that will be required, and develop a timeline. While suggested champions and action steps are included in the plan document, each community should develop more specific assignments based upon available community resources such as volunteers, community groups and organizations. This step of planning for implementation is an important step necessary to help ensure successful implementation.

          Potential resources are identified for each Action Statement. These may be guides on implementation, case studies of how other communities have implemented similar projects, sources of potential external funding, and County agencies that can provide guidance and advice.

          The Action Plans are Not Set in Stone

          The Action Plans are to be used to guide community actions and are not “set in stone”. Champions and Action Leaders are suggestions, but your community has a better idea of the best Champion for individual actions. The Action process is a general set of tasks that can be modified by the Champion, Action Leaders and/or Action Teams to best fit your community. The community should feel free to make changes and find alternatives for completing actions.

          The Community Development Toolkit

          San Bernardino County Land Use Services is in the process of creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.



        • Material in this section will be added as it is completed with community input. Click on each item for more information and a link to download the material.

          Draft Oak Glen Community Plan

          • Introduction
          • Our Community
          • Our Aspirations
          • Our Action Plans
          • Maps & Links

          • Introduction

            Oak Glen

            In 2016, the community embarked on a planning process to develop a new Community Plan. Three public workshops were held over the course of the year. These workshops, open to any Oak Glen resident or business, addressed strengths and weaknesses of the community, the community’s values, and what Oak Glen aspires to be in the future. Plan participants brainstormed areas of focus and actions to help the community move forward to achieve its aspirations.

            The results are presented as the Public Review Draft Oak Glen Community Plan through this webpage, including the four additional tabs above.
             
            Click here for a PDF version of the entire Public Review Draft Oak Glen Community Plan.
             

            • The Draft Community Plan for Public Review

              The County is looking for public comments about this Public Review Draft Community Plan. You may use the feedback form on this page to submit your comments online — look to the left or scroll down to the bottom depending on your device.

              In addition, you may e-mail comments to OakGlenCP@lus.sbcounty.gov or submit written comments by mail to:

              County of San Bernardino
              Land Use Services Department
              385 N. Arrowhead Ave., 1st Floor
              San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

              This Draft Community Plan was created by the community members who attended workshops, provided comments online or sent in written comments. It is written in the words of those participating in the public engagement process. Therefore, the communitiy’s plan retains the voice and future image of the community presented by the community members participating in the public engagement process.

            • How to Use This Plan

              Purpose and Approach

              Overall, the Community Plans are a guide for communities to create the future character and independent identity, as identified in the workshops with community values and aspirations, through completion of a community action plan. As stated at the community workshops, the new Community Plans replace any existing 2007/2014 Community Plans, with a greater focus on community self-reliance, grass-roots action, and implementation. Goals, policies, land use, and infrastructure decisions will be addressed in the Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan.

              The Community Plan is strategic in nature and provides clear Focus Statements and Action Statements identified by the community that led to creation of an action plan that can be implemented at the grass-roots level within each community. Some actions may require assistance by a County department, but the community will take the lead in moving the action forward, identifying funding or scheduling meetings or requesting information from specific County departments.

              Plan Organization

              The Community Plan is organized into three main sections, the community’s Values, community’s Aspirations, and Action Plans.

              VALUES – Those shared assets, principles, standards, mores and in the judgement of the community, what is important to the lives of its residents and businesses. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

              Community Values are listed under the Our Community tab.

              ASPIRATIONS– A written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Plan is fully implemented. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. It is written as if the community’s desired changes have already occurred. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

              Community Aspirations are listed under the Our Aspirations tab.

              ACTION PLANS– The action plans consist of:

                  • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                  • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                  • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

                The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

                Action Plans are listed under the Our Action Plans tab.

                The Plan as a Living Document

                The Community Plan and the Countywide Plan are designed to be web-based plans and therefore will be easily updated. The Community Plan is intended to be championed and implemented by the community. The Focus Statements and Action Statement within the plan were created through public engagement workshops by community participants.

                The plan is meant as a way to organize activities and provide overall direction to move the community forward. The plan should never be considered to be written in stone, but should be malleable as the needs of the community continue to change. Focus Statements and Action Statements should be changed and amended as Action Statements are completed or new priorities take their place.

                The Community should consider reviewing its plan annually to celebrate what was accomplished and make changes to the plan, as necessary, to ensure it is a relevant work plan. Communities should report back to the San Bernardino County Land Use Services Department, Planning Division as they complete actions to ensure their plan is updated online with success stories included on their website and at least annually to ensure their action plans are updated reflecting completed actions. As communities complete their Action Plans, the County will determine when to revisit the community to expand or modify their action plans.

            • Relationship to the Countywide Vision and Countywide Plan

              Relationship to Countywide Vision

              The Community Plan’s values and goals are specific to. However, they are consistent with, build on, and contribute to the Countywide Vision.

              Relationship to Countywide Plan

              In 2010, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors set out to establish a vision for the future of the county as a whole, and subsequently adopted a Countywide Vision in 2011 after two years of input from the community and the county’s 24 cities and towns. Following the adoption of the Countywide Vision, which calls for the creation of a “complete county”, the Board adopted the County paradigm and job statements in 2012.

              In 2015, the County of San Bernardino launched an effort to go further than any county or city has ever gone with a general plan by creating a web-based comprehensive “complete county” plan. General plans are almost always strictly rule books for guiding development and growth. The County’s General Plan, last updated in 2007, will go well beyond a traditional general plan to become a comprehensive Countywide Plan that complements and informs the Countywide Vision by taking into account all services—not just land-use planning—provided by County Government, and the unique values and priorities of each unincorporated community.

              The Countywide Plan serves as a guide for County decision-making, financial planning, and communications. Its web-based format provides a wealth of easily accessible data on how the County operates, and allow independent research using County data and information.

              The Countywide Plan includes:

                  • A County Policy Plan, which serves in part as the County’s General Plan for the unincorporated areas and also provides guidance for regional county services. The Policy Plan establishes goals and policies for the entire county as well as specific sub regions and communities.
                  • A County Business Plan, which contains governance policies and operational metrics that outline the County’s approach to providing municipal and regional services.
                  • A Regional Issues Forum, which is an online resource for sharing information and resources related to issues confronting the entire county.
                  • A Community Plans Continuum, which articulates what is important to each Community, and for the most part, would be implemented by the Community. Links will also be provided for maps, goals, and policies in the Policy Plan.

            • Where Did the Goals, Policies, and Land Use Map for My Community’s Plan Go?

              The existing Community Plan content was used in the development of the new draft Community Plan and Countywide Plan. Goals and policies from the existing community plan, as well as proposed land use changes discussed during the community workshops, will be considered for inclusion in the County Policy Plan, a component of the Countywide Plan. The Land Use Map will be adopted as part of the County Policy Plan. The content of the draft Community Plan focuses on those actions identified by the community that the community is willing to take to make desired changes to their community. The County Policy Plan and the Community Plans will both be web-based, with adoption of the Countywide Plan in late 2018.

            • What is the Community Development Toolkit?

              The County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department is creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.





          • Our Community


              Oak Glen

            • Who We Are

              Oak Glen is a historic agricultural community nestled in the San Bernardino Mountains. With families who have lived in Oak Glen for generations, the community is very family oriented and focused on preserving their unique way of life. Oak Glen values the natural resources, agricultural traditions, and close-knit family values that make the community a special place. Oak Glen strives to promote responsible use and development of the land in the community by sharing their agricultural practices and traditions with visitors throughout the region. Concerned with keeping the community rural, residents and businesses seek to balance their way of life with the pressures of agritourism and the preservation of a rural mountain lifestyle.

              Strengths and Opportunities

              Community workshops were conducted in each community as part of the engagement process. In addition, input was gathered through the Countywide Plan website. As part of the process, participants defined the strengths of and opportunities for their community. The word cloud below was created using the input provided during the Strengths, Opportunities, Values and Aspirations exercises and served as part of the base information utilized to develop the Focus and Action Statements of the Community Plan. The word cloud quickly informed participants of key issues and focus areas that could be addressed in the plan. The more a word or phrase was articulated, the larger the word appears in the cloud. The full results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats gathered as a part of the engagement process are found in the Community Profile.

              Oak Glen Word Cloud

            • Community Values

              The Values are those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important in the lives of its residents and businesses. A community’s values are an important consideration in shaping its aspirations, focus and actions.

               

              Agricultural Roots

              Oak Glen residents value the agricultural history, culture, and traditions that help define the community.


              Rural Lifestyle

              Oak Glen residents value the community’s rural lifestyle and agricultural roots.


              Agritourism

              Oak Glen residents value the apple growing history and culture, and the benefits of the local agritourism industry.


              Community Spirit

              Oak Glen residents value a strong complementary sense of community, family, and neighborly attitude to help one another.


              Recreational Opportunities

              Oak Glen residents value the natural beauty, clean air, and recreational opportunities of the community’s mountain setting.


              Resiliency

              Oak Glen residents value community safety and resilience against natural hazards.


              Local Businesses

              Oak Glen residents value the locally owned business culture and the local businesses that help define the community.

            • Community Profile

              The community profile is a summary of the social, cultural, economic, and historic dimensions of Oak Glen. It presents data collected through secondary sources to inform future actions. The profile, together with future studies and information gathered from residents highlights essential facets and “tell the story” of the Oak Glen Community.

              Click here for a PDF version of the complete Community Profile.




          • Our Aspirations

            Oak Glen Workshop #1

            The Aspirations Statement is a written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Focus Statements and Action Statements are fully implemented. This is a long term view of 10 to 20 years. The Aspirations Statement serves as a foundation for developing Community Focus Statements and Action Statements.


            • 1. Tourism-Focused Growth

              Because of Oak Glen’s beautiful natural setting and unique position as one of the most well-known apple producing areas in the region, agriculture-based tourism continues to expand with enhanced marketing. Local producers create educational programs to share their knowledge with visitors and schools in the area. The agricultural heritage and success of the local apple orchards fuel economic growth around the industry, with restaurants and small locally owned shops focused on tourism.


            • 2. Knowledge of Historic Roots

              Through fundraising and volunteer efforts by local community groups, residents expand the Historic Oak Glen Schoolhouse Museum to include exhibits on the heritage of farming and rural living. The exhibits ensure that each new generation learns about the history of Oak Glen and why the community looks and functions the way it does. A new program of community events, sponsored primarily by local businesses, is successful in creating a sense of pride in the community’s historical roots.




          • Our Action Plans

            Action Plans

            Click here for a PDF version of the compiled Public Review Draft Oak Glen Action Plans.

            The Action Plans consist of:

                  • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                  • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                  • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

            Focus Statements and Action Statements

            Each Focus Statement is listed below. The Action Statements display under the corresponding Focus Statement. Expanded discussions of each Action Statement are included in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

            The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

            Focus Statements


            • A. Preserve and enhance the rural agricultural character and setting of Oak Glen

              Action Statements

              A1. Encourage County identification and designation of important agricultural resources and collaborate to preserve these resources as historic landmarks.

              A2. Encourage traditional merit standards to fit the community’s agricultural and Americana-style identity to fit in with existing historic buildings and incorporate into County building standards.

              A3. Encourage existing and future agricultural production to support and expand the concept of a living historic museum that educates visitors about historic agricultural practices used within the community.


            • B. Ensure safe and effective mobility options that accommodate the community’s needs throughout the year

              Action Statements

              B1. Advocate and collaborate with the County to enhance public safety improvements along Oak Glen Road that reduce vehicular accidents/issues for pedestrians, local residents, and visitors.

              B2. Advocate for and seek funding to expand right-of-way improvements along Oak Glen Road that include additional travel/turn lanes, pedestrian and bicycle facilities, and adequate parking spaces to meet peak demand.

              B3. Advocate for and seek funding to construct traffic calming improvements that increase safety for pedestrians and visitors along the busiest sections of Oak Glen Road.


            • C. Preserve and enhance the unique environmental features of Oak Glen including native wildlife, vegetation, and scenic vistas, while enhancing open space and recreational opportunities and amenities

              Action Statements

              C1. Establish a community-based education program for landscaping and vegetation maintenance and management.

              C2. Identify scenic vistas in the community that should be protected and enhanced, and develop educational kiosks to share key information about these resources with tourists to the area.

              C3. Enhance existing recreational facilities such as tent camp sites by bringing them up to code within Oak Glen to support continual use year round.


            • D. Promote economic development that compliments the rural agricultural character and natural setting of the Oak Glen community

              Action Statements

              D1. Enhance hospitality uses that allow overnight accommodations by promoting short-term rental opportunities and educating B&B and short-term rental owners on county regulations.

              D2. Advocate and collaborate with the County to develop community based standards for wedding venue priority areas and requirements to alleviate nuisance issues.


            Action Plan Matrices

            The Action Plan Matrix for each Action Statement listed above can be found in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

            How to Implement the Action Plans

            The Action Plans provide a general organization of the action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement. The Community may want to meet to identify the top three to five priority Action Statements to work on first. Some of these may be those actions that the community believes could be completed quickly and easily. Completion of one Action Statement will provide the community and local groups with the motivation to move forward with another Action Statement.

            Once an Action Statement is selected for implementation, the Community identifies a champion for that Action Statement to initiate activities, identify those responsible for carrying out action steps, identify and secure resources that will be required, and develop a timeline. While suggested champions and action steps are included in the plan document, each community should develop more specific assignments based upon available community resources such as volunteers, community groups and organizations. This step of planning for implementation is an important step necessary to help ensure successful implementation.

            Potential resources are identified for each Action Statement. These may be guides on implementation, case studies of how other communities have implemented similar projects, sources of potential external funding, and County agencies that can provide guidance and advice.

            The Action Plans are Not Set in Stone

            The Action Plans are to be used to guide community actions and are not “set in stone”. Champions and Action Leaders are suggestions, but your community has a better idea of the best Champion for individual actions. The Action process is a general set of tasks that can be modified by the Champion, Action Leaders and/or Action Teams to best fit your community. The community should feel free to make changes and find alternatives for completing actions.

            The Community Development Toolkit

            San Bernardino County Land Use Services is in the process of creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.



          • Material in this section will be added as it is completed with community input. Click on each item for more information and a link to download the material.

            Draft Mentone Community Plan

            • Introduction
            • Our Community
            • Our Aspirations
            • Our Action Plans
            • Maps & Links

            • Introduction

              Mentone

              In 2016, the community embarked on a planning process to develop a new Community Plan. Three public workshops were held over the course of the year. These workshops, open to any Mentone resident or business, addressed strengths and weaknesses of the community, the community’s values, and what Mentone aspires to be in the future. Plan participants brainstormed areas of focus and actions to help the community move forward to achieve its aspirations.
               
              The results are presented as the Public Review Draft Mentone Community Plan through this webpage, including the four additional tabs above.
               

              Click here for a PDF version of the entire Public Review Draft Mentone Community Plan.
               

              • The Draft Community Plan for Public Review

                The County is looking for public comments about this Public Review Draft Community Plan. You may use the feedback form on this page to submit your comments online — look to the left or scroll down to the bottom depending on your device.

                In addition, you may e-mail comments to MentoneCP@lus.sbcounty.gov or submit written comments by mail to:

                County of San Bernardino
                Land Use Services Department
                385 N. Arrowhead Ave., 1st Floor
                San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

                This Draft Community Plan was created by the community members who attended workshops, provided comments online, or sent in written comments. It is written in the words of those participating in the public engagement process. Therefore, the community’s plan retains the voice and future image of the community presented by the community members participating in the public engagement process.

              • How to Use This Plan

                Purpose and Approach

                Overall, the Community Plans are guides for communities to create their future character and independent identity, as identified in the workshops with community values and aspirations, through completion of a community action plan. As stated at the community workshops, the new Community Plans replace any existing 2007/2014 Community Plans, with a greater focus on community self-reliance, grass-roots action, and implementation. Goals, policies, land use, and infrastructure decisions will be addressed in the Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan.

                The Community Plan is strategic in nature and provides clear Focus Statements and Action Statements identified by the community that led to creation of an Action Plan that can be implemented at the grass-roots level within each community. Some actions may require assistance of a County department, but the community will take the lead in moving the action forward, identifying funding or scheduling meetings, or requesting information from specific County departments.

                Plan Organization

                The Community Plan is organized into three main sections, the community’s Values, community’s Aspirations, and Action Plans.

                VALUES – Those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important to the lives of its residents and businesses. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

                Community Values are listed under the Our Community tab.

                ASPIRATIONS– A written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Plan is fully implemented. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. It is written as if the community’s desired changes have already occurred. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

                Community Aspirations are listed under the Our Aspirations tab.

                ACTION PLANS– The Action Plans consist of:

                    • Focus Statements, which provide general direction toward realizing the community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3.)
                    • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative, or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3.)
                    • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the Action Statement, provide a general timeline for implementation, and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the community’s identified Focus and Action Statements.)

                The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority Action Statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related Action Plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

                Action Plans are listed under the Our Action Plans tab.

                The Plan as a Living Document

                The Community Plan and the Countywide Plan are designed to be web-based plans and therefore will be easily updated. The Community Plan is intended to be championed and implemented by the community. The Focus Statements and Action Statement within the plan were created through public engagement workshops by community participants.

                The Community Plan is meant as a way to organize activities and provide overall direction to move the community forward. The plan should never be considered to be written in stone, but should be malleable as the needs of the community continue to change. Focus Statements and Action Statements should be changed and amended as Action Statements are completed or new priorities take their place.

                The community should consider reviewing its plan annually to celebrate what was accomplished and make changes to the plan, as necessary, to ensure it is a relevant work plan. Communities should report back to the San Bernardino County Land Use Services Department, Planning Division, as they complete actions to ensure that their plan is updated online and their success stories are included. Their website should be updated at least annually to ensure their action plans are updated reflecting completed actions. As communities complete their Action Plans, the County will determine when to revisit the community to expand or modify their Action Plans.

              • Relationship to the Countywide Vision and Countywide Plan

                Relationship to Countywide Vision

                The Community Plan’s values and goals are specific to the community. However, they are consistent with, build on, and contribute to the Countywide Vision.

                Relationship to Countywide Plan

                In 2010, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors set out to establish a vision for the future of the county as a whole, and subsequently adopted a Countywide Vision in 2011 after two years of input from the community and the county’s 24 cities and towns. Following the adoption of the Countywide Vision, which calls for the creation of a “complete county.” The Board adopted the County paradigm and job statements in 2012.

                In 2015, the County of San Bernardino launched an effort to go further than any county or city has ever gone with a general plan by creating a web-based, comprehensive, “complete county” plan. General plans are almost always strictly rule books for guiding development and growth. The County’s General Plan, last updated in 2007, will go well beyond a traditional general plan to become a comprehensive Countywide Plan that complements and informs the Countywide Vision by taking into account all services—not just land-use planning—provided by County government, and the unique values and priorities of each unincorporated community.

                The Countywide Plan serves as a guide for County decision-making, financial planning, and communications. Its web-based format provides a wealth of easily accessible data on how the County operates and allows independent research using County data and information.

                The Countywide Plan includes:

                    • A County Policy Plan, which serves in part as the County’s General Plan for the unincorporated areas and also provides guidance for regional county services. The Policy Plan establishes goals and policies for the entire county as well as specific subregions and communities.
                    • A County Business Plan, which contains governance policies and operational metrics that outline the County’s approach to providing municipal and regional services.
                    • A Regional Issues Forum, which is an online resource for sharing information and resources related to issues confronting the entire county.
                    • A Community Plans Continuum, which articulates what is important to each community, and for the most part, would be implemented by the community. Links will also be provided for maps, goals, and policies in the Policy Plan.

              • Where Did the Goals, Policies, and Land Use Map for My Community’s Plan Go?

                The existing Community Plan content was used in the development of the new draft Community Plan and Countywide Plan. Goals and policies from the existing community plan, as well as proposed land use changes discussed during the community workshops, will be considered for inclusion in the County Policy Plan, a component of the Countywide Plan. The Land Use Map will be adopted as part of the County Policy Plan. The content of the draft Community Plan focuses on those actions identified by the community that the community is willing to take to make desired changes to their community. The County Policy Plan and the Community Plans will both be web based, with adoption of the Countywide Plan in late 2018.

              • What Is the Community Development Toolkit?

                The County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department is creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s Plan.





            • Our Community


                Mentone

              • Who We Are

                Mentone is a community with deep roots in Southern California. As a waypoint/destination for many travelers heading to and from the San Bernardino Mountains, the community holds a special place in the hearts of residents and visitors alike. Mentone values its small-town feel; proximity to the Santa Ana River and San Bernardino Mountains; and agricultural uses, which are an important part of the community’s history. Mentone strives to preserve the rural, small-town feel while focusing on improving the quality of life and the desirability of the community.
                 

                Strengths and Opportunities

                Community workshops were conducted in each community as part of the engagement process. In addition, input was gathered through the Countywide Plan website. As part of the process, participants defined the strengths of and opportunities for their community. The word cloud below was created using the input provided during the Strengths, Opportunities, Values, and Aspirations exercises and served as part of the base information utilized to develop the Focus and Action Statements of the Community Plan. The word cloud quickly informed participants of key issues and focus areas that could be addressed in the plan. The more a word or phrase was articulated, the larger the word appears in the cloud. The full results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats gathered as a part of the engagement process are found in the Community Profile.

                Mentone Word Cloud

              • Community Values

                The Values are those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important in the lives of its residents and businesses. A community’s values are an important consideration in shaping its aspirations, focus, and actions.

                 

                Rural Culture

                Mentone residents value their community’s rural culture and quiet, honest way of life.


                Local Economy

                Mentone residents value an economic core of local businesses and good schools.


                Open Space

                Mentone residents value the preservation of local agriculture and open spaces.


                Safety

                Mentone residents value maintaining a safe community that is comfortable and enjoyable for all residents.


                Public Transportation

                Mentone residents value regional access through public transportation.

              • Community Profile

                The community profile is a summary of the social, cultural, economic, and historical dimensions of Mentone. It presents data collected through secondary sources to inform future actions. The profile, together with future studies and information gathered from residents, highlights essential facets and “tells the story” of the Mentone Community.

                Click here for a PDF version of the complete Community Profile.




            • Our Aspirations

              Mentone residents rank actions necessary to achieve the goals and objectives at the third community workshop.

              The Aspirations Statement is a written narrative illustrating how the community desires to look and function once the Community Focus Statements and Action Statements are accomplished. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. The Aspirations Statement serves as a foundation for developing Community Focus Statements and Action Statements.


              • 1. Community Sustainability and Cleanliness

                Residents recognize the need to create a sustainable and resilient community during the community planning process and acknowledge the steps necessary to ensure that adequate infrastructure and resources are available to handle changing conditions.


              • 2. Recognition of Natural and Agricultural Resources

                For many residents, agriculture represents their livelihood and is a very important aspect of the community. Agritourism has drawn many residents, who came to Mentone because of the rich agricultural history. Those who call Mentone home treasure the preservation and expansion of the groves and agricultural uses in the community.


              • 3. Expanded Open Space

                Residents engage in a collaborative planning effort with local community organizations, schools, and other interested stakeholders to prepare and implement a study to increase open space and recreational opportunities identified by the community. Our community identified several potential locations and narrowed the search through a community vote. Fundraising efforts and sponsorships from local businesses result in new neighborhood parks, while local interest groups create signage for existing hiking and biking trails in the area.


              • 4. Enhanced Infrastructure

                Our community implements strategies for more efficient and pedestrian-friendly means of transportation, including working with Omnitrans to organize new bus routes. We also support construction of sidewalks in limited areas to make the community more accessible for everyone. These improvements create a more pedestrian-friendly atmosphere while keeping up with needed infrastructure maintenance of our roads and existing sidewalks.


              • 4. Preserve the “Old Town Feel with Western Flair”

                Residents feel a connection with their unique surroundings and the character of the community. Mentone is a community of established homes and a historic “old town” feel. Our community is proud of its history and continues to work to preserve that feeling through measured growth and development.




            • Our Action Plans

              Action Plans

              Click here for a PDF version of the compiled Public Review Draft Mentone Action Plans.

              The Action Plans consist of:

                    • Focus Statements, which provide general direction toward realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3.)
                    • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative, or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3.)
                    • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the Action Statement, provide a general timeline for implementation, and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements.)

              Focus Statements and Action Statements

              Each Focus Statement is listed, below. The Action Statements display under the corresponding Focus Statement. Expanded discussions of Each Action Statement are included in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

              The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority Action Statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related Action Plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

              Focus Statements


              • A. Protect the community’s treasures for years to come.

                Action Statements

                A1. Establish a façade and sign improvement program that defines the Mentone look and feel.
                 
                A2. Preserve and expand agricultural production within Mentone through agritourism, urban agricultural practices, nurseries, and the development of community gardens.
                 
                A3. Construct a community center that accommodates community-focused events, evening meetings, and recreational activities.
                 
                A4. Promote expanded economic and tourism activity along Mentone Boulevard (Highway 38) that highlights the community’s history and proximity to the San Bernardino Mountains.
                 
                A5. Advocate changes in development standards requiring new development to set aside land for open space and/or agricultural use.
                 


              • B. Enhance pedestrian safety and mobility along Mentone Boulevard (Highway 38).

                Action Statements

                B1. Advocate and collaborate with Caltrans to develop a master plan for signage, striping, and lighting along Highway 38 that enhances public safety and pedestrian connectivity.
                 
                B2. Identify and advocate improvements along major roadways in Mentone that are impacted by development activities outside of the community.
                 
                B3. Coordinate with local transit agencies to increase mobility in the community through improved transit services.
                 
                B4. Advocate the development and expansion of pedestrian pathways and trails that connect Mentone to open space areas such as the San Bernardino Mountains and Santa Ana River.
                 
                B5. Support the County’s expansion of the Santa Ana River Multipurpose Trail.
                 


              • C. Improve public safety, health, and welfare within the community.

                Action Statements

                C1. Promote, through a public education campaign, the effective use of private outdoor lighting that enhances resident and business safety while protecting night sky views and resources.
                 
                C2. Establish an access and functional needs assessment for residents and businesses within Mentone.
                 
                C3. Advocate improved water quality and sewage infrastructure throughout the community to reduce groundwater pollution and improve water quality in local waterways.
                 


              • D. Enhance and expand connectivity to regional open space and recreational areas.

                Action Statements

                D1. Establish a non-vehicular mobility plan to advocate for additional bike paths and pedestrian paths that connect to existing and proposed regional trail networks.
                 
                D2. Develop and incorporate historical information and signage throughout the community regarding natural resources and amenities.
                 


              • E. Improve communication and coordination between Mentone and the County.

                Action Statements

                E1. Establish an effective communication process between Mentone, the County, and adjacent cities that increases information and understanding of planning projects and initiatives.
                 
                E2. Coordinate with County fire and sheriff’s departments for service information that can be shared with businesses and residents.
                 


              Action Plan Matrices

              The Action Plan Matrix for each Action Statement listed above can be found in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

              How to Implement the Action Plans

              The Action Plans provide a general organization of the action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement. The community may want to meet to identify the top three to five priority Action Statements to work on first. Some of these may be those actions that the community believes could be completed quickly and easily. Completion of one Action Statement will provide the community and local groups with the motivation to move forward with another Action Statement.

              Once an Action Statement is selected for implementation, the community identifies a champion for that Action Statement to initiate activities, identify those responsible for carrying out action steps, identify and secure resources that will be required, and develop a timeline. While suggested champions and action steps are included in the plan document, each community should develop more-specific assignments based upon available community resources such as volunteers, community groups, and organizations. This planning for implementation is an important step necessary to help ensure successful implementation.

              Potential resources are identified for each Action Statement. These may be guides on implementation, case studies of how other communities have implemented similar projects, sources of potential external funding, and County agencies that can provide guidance and advice.

              The Action Plans Are Not Set in Stone

              The Action Plans are to be used to guide community actions and are not set in stone. Champions and action leaders are suggestions, but your community has a better idea of the best champion for individual actions. The action process is a general set of tasks that can be modified by the champion, action leaders, and/or action teams to best fit your community. The community should feel free to make changes and find alternatives for completing actions.

              The Community Development Toolkit

              San Bernardino County Land Use Services is in the process of creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the community’s plan.



            • Material in this section will be added as it is completed with community input. Click on each item for more information and a link to download material.

              Draft Lucerne Valley Community Plan

              • Introduction
              • Our Community
              • Our Aspirations
              • Our Action Plans
              • Maps & Links

              • Introduction

                Lucerne Valley

                In 2016, the community embarked on a planning process to develop a new Community Plan. Three public workshops were held over the course of the year. These workshops, open to any Lucerne Valley resident or business, addressed strengths and weaknesses of the community, the community’s values, and what Lucerne Valley aspires to be in the future. Plan participants brainstormed areas of focus and actions to help the community move forward to achieve its aspirations.

                The results are presented as the Public Review Draft Lucerne Valley Community Plan through this webpage, including the four additional tabs above.
                Click here for a PDF version of the entire Public Review Draft Lucerne Valley Community Plan.

                • The Draft Community Plan for Public Review

                  The County is looking for public comments about this Public Review Draft Community Plan. You may use the feedback form on this page to submit your comments online — look to the left or scroll down to the bottom depending on your device.

                  In addition, you may e-mail comments to LucerneValleyCP@lus.sbcounty.gov or submit written comments by mail to:

                  County of San Bernardino
                  Land Use Services Department
                  385 N. Arrowhead Ave., 1st Floor
                  San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

                  This Draft Community Plan was created by the community members who attended workshops, provided comments online or sent in written comments. It is written in the words of those participating in the public engagement process. Therefore, the communitiy’s plan retains the voice and future image of the community presented by the community members participating in the public engagement process.

                • How to Use This Plan

                  Purpose and Approach

                  Overall, the Community Plans are a guide for communities to create the future character and independent identity, as identified in the workshops with community values and aspirations, through completion of a community action plan. As stated at the community workshops, the new Community Plans replace any existing 2007/2014 Community Plans, with a greater focus on community self-reliance, grass-roots action, and implementation. Goals, policies, land use, and infrastructure decisions will be addressed in the Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan.

                  The Community Plan is strategic in nature and provides clear Focus Statements and Action Statements identified by the community that led to creation of an action plan that can be implemented at the grass-roots level within each community. Some actions may require assistance by a County department, but the community will take the lead in moving the action forward, identifying funding or scheduling meetings or requesting information from specific County departments.

                  Plan Organization

                  The Community Plan is organized into three main sections, the community’s Values, community’s Aspirations, and Action Plans.

                  VALUES – Those shared assets, principles, standards, mores and in the judgement of the community, what is important to the lives of its residents and businesses. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

                  Community Values are listed under the Our Community tab.

                  ASPIRATIONS– A written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Plan is fully implemented. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. It is written as if the community’s desired changes have already occurred. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

                  Community Aspirations are listed under the Our Aspirations tab.

                  ACTION PLANS– The action plans consist of:

                      • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                      • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                      • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

                    The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

                    Action Plans are listed under the Our Action Plans tab.

                    The Plan as a Living Document

                    The Community Plan and the Countywide Plan are designed to be web-based plans and therefore will be easily updated. The Community Plan is intended to be championed and implemented by the community. The Focus Statements and Action Statement within the plan were created through public engagement workshops by community participants.

                    The plan is meant as a way to organize activities and provide overall direction to move the community forward. The plan should never be considered to be written in stone, but should be malleable as the needs of the community continue to change. Focus Statements and Action Statements should be changed and amended as Action Statements are completed or new priorities take their place.

                    The Community should consider reviewing its plan annually to celebrate what was accomplished and make changes to the plan, as necessary, to ensure it is a relevant work plan. Communities should report back to the San Bernardino County Land Use Services Department, Planning Division as they complete actions to ensure their plan is updated online with success stories included on their website and at least annually to ensure their action plans are updated reflecting completed actions. As communities complete their Action Plans, the County will determine when to revisit the community to expand or modify their action plans.

                • Relationship to the Countywide Vision and Countywide Plan

                  Relationship to Countywide Vision

                  The Community Plan’s values and goals are specific to. However, they are consistent with, build on, and contribute to the Countywide Vision.

                  Relationship to Countywide Plan

                  In 2010, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors set out to establish a vision for the future of the county as a whole, and subsequently adopted a Countywide Vision in 2011 after two years of input from the community and the county’s 24 cities and towns. Following the adoption of the Countywide Vision, which calls for the creation of a “complete county”, the Board adopted the County paradigm and job statements in 2012.

                  In 2015, the County of San Bernardino launched an effort to go further than any county or city has ever gone with a general plan by creating a web-based comprehensive “complete county” plan. General plans are almost always strictly rule books for guiding development and growth. The County’s General Plan, last updated in 2007, will go well beyond a traditional general plan to become a comprehensive Countywide Plan that complements and informs the Countywide Vision by taking into account all services—not just land-use planning—provided by County Government, and the unique values and priorities of each unincorporated community.

                  The Countywide Plan serves as a guide for County decision-making, financial planning, and communications. Its web-based format provides a wealth of easily accessible data on how the County operates, and allow independent research using County data and information.

                  The Countywide Plan includes:

                      • A County Policy Plan, which serves in part as the County’s General Plan for the unincorporated areas and also provides guidance for regional county services. The Policy Plan establishes goals and policies for the entire county as well as specific sub regions and communities.
                      • A County Business Plan, which contains governance policies and operational metrics that outline the County’s approach to providing municipal and regional services.
                      • A Regional Issues Forum, which is an online resource for sharing information and resources related to issues confronting the entire county.
                      • A Community Plans Continuum, which articulates what is important to each Community, and for the most part, would be implemented by the Community. Links will also be provided for maps, goals, and policies in the Policy Plan.

                • Where Did the Goals, Policies, and Land Use Map for My Community’s Plan Go?

                  The existing Community Plan content was used in the development of the new draft Community Plan and Countywide Plan. Goals and policies from the existing community plan, as well as proposed land use changes discussed during the community workshops, will be considered for inclusion in the County Policy Plan, a component of the Countywide Plan. The Land Use Map will be adopted as part of the County Policy Plan. The content of the draft Community Plan focuses on those actions identified by the community that the community is willing to take to make desired changes to their community. The County Policy Plan and the Community Plans will both be web-based, with adoption of the Countywide Plan in late 2018.

                • What is the Community Development Toolkit?

                  The County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department is creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.





              • Our Community


                  Lucerne Valley

                • Who We Are

                  Lucerne Valley is a high desert community that strongly values the natural beauty of the surrounding desert/mountain landscape. Fiercely independent and protective of its rural character, the community strives to promote responsible and sustainable growth while safeguarding both the desert lifestyle and the environment. Aware of the challenges that life in the Mojave Desert can often bring, the people of Lucerne Valley are nonetheless committed to ensuring that the community is provided with excellent infrastructure, essential services, and outstanding recreational opportunities.

                  Strengths and Opportunities

                  Community workshops were conducted in each community as part of the engagement process. In addition, input was gathered through the Countywide Plan website. As part of the process, participants defined the strengths of and opportunities for their community. The word cloud below was created using the input provided during the Strengths, Opportunities, Values and Aspirations exercises and served as part of the base information utilized to develop the Focus and Action Statements of the Community Plan. The word cloud quickly informed participants of key issues and focus areas that could be addressed in the plan. The more a word or phrase was articulated, the larger the word appears in the cloud. The full results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats gathered as a part of the engagement process are found in the Community Profile.

                  Lucerne Valley Word Cloud

                • Community Values

                  The Values are those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important in the lives of its residents and businesses. A community’s values are an important consideration in shaping its aspirations, focus and actions.

                   

                  Natural Beauty

                  Lucerne Valley residents value the natural beauty that defines the desert lifestyle.


                  Local Businesses

                  Lucerne Valley residents value the history and perseverance of local businesses in the community.


                  Community Independence

                  Lucerne Valley residents value the independent nature of the community and embracing challenges that are inherent to the region.


                  Historic Character

                  Lucerne Valley residents value the history, character, and beauty of the area.


                  Rural Desert Lifestyle

                  Lucerne Valley residents value the unique character of the desert environment, dark skies, and a peaceful and quiet atmosphere.


                  Growth Opportunities

                  Lucerne Valley residents value responsible growth that respects and complements the culture of the community.

                • Community Profile

                  The community profile is a summary of the social, cultural, economic, and historic dimensions of Lucerne Valley. It presents data collected through secondary sources to inform future actions. The profile, together with future studies and information gathered from residents highlights essential facets and “tell the story” of the Lucerne Valley Community.

                  Click here for a PDF version of the complete Community Profile.




              • Our Aspirations

                Lucerne Valley Workshop #1

                The Aspirations Statement is a written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Focus Statements and Action Statements are fully implemented. This is a long term view of 10 to 20 years. The Aspirations Statement serves as a foundation for developing Community Focus Statements and Action Statements.


                • 1. Responsible Economic Growth

                  Finding ways to expand the local economy of Lucerne Valley has been one of residents’ top priorities. Our community is fortunate to have a local market that supplies many of the everyday essentials. However, it has always been extremely important to increase the number of local businesses that provide goods and services to the community. Local community leaders develop guidelines to submit to the County of San Bernardino that serve as recommendations on the types of uses allowed and the pace at which the community should grow. The guidelines help to ensure that residents have access to local jobs and that the economy continues to develop and diversify.


                • 2. Quality of Life

                  Our community is unique in many ways, one of which is that most residents have large lots that afford us privacy and give us the ability to interact with the untouched natural environment. Despite some of the drawbacks of rural living, residents of Lucerne Valley choose to live here because of the natural beauty, dark skies, and quiet atmosphere, so it is important that these elements remain unchanged as the community continues to evolve.


                • 3. Improvements to the Physical Environment

                  Water availability, unmaintained infrastructure, and environmental health concerns are all issues the community continues to tackle. A committee of community members provides input to the County of San Bernardino on solutions to water accessibility, with hauled water and other solutions remaining options. The community also has a formal way to notify the County of infrastructure issues such as damaged roads or electrical problems, improving repair times and helping to make the community function more efficiently.


                • 4. Community Stability

                  As external factors that impact the community continue to change over the years, residents of Lucerne Valley look for social, economic, and environmental stability. Community members were proactive in starting committees or organizations to hold local events that continue to grow each year, bringing the community closer together. Controlled development and growth in the area through coordinated business attraction efforts improve the local economy. The creation of a community “Welcome Packet” has helped to teach new residents and visitors about the area and encourages them to treat the local environment with respect.




              • Our Action Plans

                Action Plans

                Click here for a PDF version of the compiled Public Review Draft Lucerne Valley Action Plans.

                The Action Plans consist of:

                      • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                      • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                      • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

                Focus Statements and Action Statements

                Each Focus Statement is listed below. The Action Statements display under the corresponding Focus Statement. Expanded discussions of each Action Statement are included in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

                The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

                Focus Statements


                • A. Maintain the rural character of the community

                  Action Statements

                  A1. Aspire to be a model renewable energy community with a principal focus on point-of-use, rooftop solar. Utility scale solar and wind projects, primarily intended to serve Lucerne Valley, should only be permitted in designated areas such as Tamarisk Flats to minimize the visual impact on the landscape.

                  A2. Encourage the County to adopt rural desert development standards more befitting the high desert community and in keeping with Lucerne Valley’s rural character and sense of openness.

                  A3. Partner with organizations and land trusts to protect and conserve Lucerne Valley’s unique natural desert habitats and wildlife corridors, and to maintain the balance between the human and natural communities to maintain a functioning desert/mountain transitional ecosystem.

                  A4. Establish a landscaping and lighting guide to help current and new residents and businesses either install or modify landscaping and lighting to meet the needs of the desert and dark sky regulations.

                  A5. Establish a welcome program to greet new residents, educate them on the unique desert experience, and offer them information regarding the community.


                • B. Promote responsible and sustainable development consistent with Lucerne Valley’s rural character

                  Action Statements

                  B1. Establish community-based design guidelines that encourage a common rural design theme for commercial building façades to assist designers in meeting community expectations and to create a cohesive architectural style within the business district.

                  B2. Promote Lucerne Valley as an ideal location for the development of a senior living facility, in particular, close to the Lucerne Valley Senior Center.

                  B3. Advocate for limiting industrial development to only those areas adjacent to the existing railroad tracks in southeastern Lucerne Valley.

                  B4. Partner with a housing advocacy group or nonprofit to identify and rehabilitate existing housing stock, recognizing a number of existing homes are in need of repair or have been abandoned.

                  B5. Investigate methods of financing a revolving fund to assist with the rehabilitation of owner-occupied homes, which would improve the community’s aesthetics while creating local jobs for contractors and handy-men.


                • C. Improve the local road system for increased safety and function Improve the local road system for increased safety and function

                  Action Statements

                  C1. Coordinate with the County Public Works Department and Caltrans to prioritize local roads in need of improvement, to ensure regular maintenance of the road system, and to increase the safety of the community’s roads.

                  C2. Partner with the Lucerne Valley & Johnson Valley Municipal Advisory Council and the County on a project to install new and more readable street name signs throughout the communities.

                  C3. Continue efforts to designate California State Highway 247/Old Woman Springs Road declared a Scenic Highway.

                  C4. Coordinate with the County, Caltrans, the school district, and other stakeholders to develop a Safe Routes to School Program for Lucerne Valley children.

                  C5. Explore desert road development standards that downplay the need for urban street improvements such as street lighting, curb and gutter, and sidewalks excepts as needed for safety.


                • D. Improve Lucerne Valley’s water and sewer infrastructure with a focus on the community’s sustainability

                  Action Statements

                  D1. Encourage community members to lobby the California State Legislature to change state law to allow hauled water for certain types and locations of homes.

                  D2. Support the Mojave Basin Area Adjudication as it relates to water production rights.

                  D3. Coordinate with County Flood Control to improve flood mitigation measures throughout the community and advocate for a stormwater retention basin to effectively capture stormwater runoff.

                  D4. Coordinate with the State Department of Water Resources (DWR) to have the agency update its analysis of the Lucerne Valley Groundwater Basin.

                  D5. Coordinate with the County to centralize a refuse transfer station, sewage treatment plant, bio-solid energy plant, and electrical substation at Tamarisk Flats.


                • E. Improve the delivery of essential services such as police and fire to the community

                  Action Statements

                  E1. Coordinate with Cal Fire to change the boundaries of the State Responsibility Area (SRA) by shifting the boundary line of the SRA south to include only federals lands along the San Bernardino Mountains.

                  E2. Conduct a community inventory of properties that may be in need of code enforcement action and meet regularly with County Code Enforcement to help point out issues and to determine if there are community-based solutions, in particular, with regard to enforcement of property maintenance standards and illegal dumping.

                  E3. Advocate for improved health care services for the community with a near-term focus on attracting a mobile medical clinic staffed with a nurse practitioner for regularly scheduled visits to Lucerne Valley.

                  E4. Coordinate with the County Public Works Department and the Lucerne Valley Transfer Station to reduce solid waste disposal fees and to expand the types of materials acceptable for disposal.

                  E5. Treat our local homeless and disadvantaged population with respect and assist them with finding adequate housing.


                • F. Create greater recreational and educational opportunities within Lucerne Valley

                  Action Statements

                  F1. Partner with local organizations such as the Lucerne Valley Museum Association to establish and operate a Lucerne Valley Museum.

                  F2. Provide better senior programs and activities on a level comparable to those provided to in other neighboring communities.

                  F3. Enhance appreciation for the desert in school age children by partnering with local organizations and land trusts to develop a desert education program that studies the natural environment, geology, history, etc. and incorporates field trips.

                  F4. Partner with the Lucerne Valley Unified School District, the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools, and other educators to ensure that the community’s schools.


                • G. Strive to make Lucerne Valley energy self-sustainable

                  Action Statements

                  G1. Promote programs that assist home and business owners with financing energy-efficiency upgrades.

                  G2. Coordinate with the County to convert the community’s street lights to low color temperature LED street lighting.

                  G3. Programs to educate the community on the importance of a sustainable lifestyle and ways to minimize the footprint left on the environment.


                Action Plan Matrices

                The Action Plan Matrix for each Action Statement listed above can be found in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

                How to Implement the Action Plans

                The Action Plans provide a general organization of the action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement. The Community may want to meet to identify the top three to five priority Action Statements to work on first. Some of these may be those actions that the community believes could be completed quickly and easily. Completion of one Action Statement will provide the community and local groups with the motivation to move forward with another Action Statement.

                Once an Action Statement is selected for implementation, the Community identifies a champion for that Action Statement to initiate activities, identify those responsible for carrying out action steps, identify and secure resources that will be required, and develop a timeline. While suggested champions and action steps are included in the plan document, each community should develop more specific assignments based upon available community resources such as volunteers, community groups and organizations. This step of planning for implementation is an important step necessary to help ensure successful implementation.

                Potential resources are identified for each Action Statement. These may be guides on implementation, case studies of how other communities have implemented similar projects, sources of potential external funding, and County agencies that can provide guidance and advice.

                The Action Plans are Not Set in Stone

                The Action Plans are to be used to guide community actions and are not “set in stone”. Champions and Action Leaders are suggestions, but your community has a better idea of the best Champion for individual actions. The Action process is a general set of tasks that can be modified by the Champion, Action Leaders and/or Action Teams to best fit your community. The community should feel free to make changes and find alternatives for completing actions.

                The Community Development Toolkit

                San Bernardino County Land Use Services is in the process of creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.



              • Material in this section will be added as it is completed with community input. Click on each item for more information and a link to download the material.

                Draft Joshua Tree Community Plan

                • Introduction
                • Our Community
                • Our Aspirations
                • Our Action Plans
                • Maps & Links

                • Introduction

                  Joshua Tree National Park

                  In 2016, the community embarked on a planning process to develop a new Community Plan. Three public workshops were held over the course of the year. These workshops, open to any Joshua Tree resident or business, addressed strengths and weaknesses of the community, the community’s values, and what Joshua Tree aspires to be in the future. Plan participants brainstormed areas of focus and actions to help the community move forward to achieve its aspirations.

                  The results are presented as the Public Review Draft Joshua Tree Community Plan through this webpage, including the four additional tabs above.
                  Click here for a PDF version of the entire Public Review Draft Joshua Tree Community Plan

                  • The Draft Community Plan for Public Review

                    The County is looking for public comments about this Public Review Draft Community Plan. You may use the feedback form on this page to submit your comments online — look to the left or scroll down to the bottom depending on your device.

                    In addition, you may e-mail comments to JoshuaTreeCP@lus.sbcounty.gov or submit written comments by mail to:

                    County of San Bernardino
                    Land Use Services Department
                    385 N. Arrowhead Ave., 1st Floor
                    San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

                    This Draft Community Plan was created by the community members who attended workshops, provided comments online or sent in written comments. It is written in the words of those participating in the public engagement process. Therefore, the community’s plan retains the voice and future image of the community presented by the community members participating in the public engagement process.

                  • How to Use This Plan

                    Purpose and Approach

                    Overall, the Community Plans are a guide for communities to create the future character and independent identity, as identified in the workshops with community values and aspirations, through completion of a community action plan. As stated at the community workshops, the new Community Plans replace any existing 2007/2014 Community Plans, with a greater focus on community self-reliance, grass-roots action, and implementation. Goals, policies, land use, and infrastructure decisions will be addressed in the Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan.

                    The Community Plan is strategic in nature and provides clear Focus Statements and Action Statements identified by the community that led to creation of an action plan that can be implemented at the grass-roots level within each community. Some actions may require assistance by a County department, but the community will take the lead in moving the action forward, identifying funding or scheduling meetings or requesting information from specific County departments.

                    Plan Organization

                    The Community Plan is organized into three main sections, the community’s Values, community’s Aspirations, and Action Plans.

                    VALUES – Those shared assets, principles, standards, mores and in the judgement of the community, what is important to the lives of its residents and businesses. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

                    Community Values are listed under the Our Community tab.

                    ASPIRATIONS– A written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Plan is fully implemented. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. It is written as if the community’s desired changes have already occurred. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

                    Community Aspirations are listed under the Our Aspirations tab.

                    ACTION PLANS– The action plans consist of:

                        • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                        • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                        • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

                      The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

                      Action Plans are listed under the Our Action Plans tab.

                      The Plan as a Living Document

                      The Community Plan and the Countywide Plan are designed to be web-based plans and therefore will be easily updated. The Community Plan is intended to be championed and implemented by the community. The Focus Statements and Action Statement within the plan were created through public engagement workshops by community participants.

                      The plan is meant as a way to organize activities and provide overall direction to move the community forward. The plan should never be considered to be written in stone, but should be malleable as the needs of the community continue to change. Focus Statements and Action Statements should be changed and amended as Action Statements are completed or new priorities take their place.

                      The Community should consider reviewing its plan annually to celebrate what was accomplished and make changes to the plan, as necessary, to ensure it is a relevant work plan. Communities should report back to the San Bernardino County Land Use Services Department, Planning Division as they complete actions to ensure their plan is updated online with success stories included on their website and at least annually to ensure their action plans are updated reflecting completed actions. As communities complete their Action Plans, the County will determine when to revisit the community to expand or modify their action plans.

                  • Relationship to the Countywide Vision and Countywide Plan

                    Relationship to Countywide Vision

                    The Community Plan’s values and goals are specific to. However, they are consistent with, build on, and contribute to the Countywide Vision.

                    Relationship to Countywide Plan

                    In 2010, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors set out to establish a vision for the future of the county as a whole, and subsequently adopted a Countywide Vision in 2011 after two years of input from the community and the county’s 24 cities and towns. Following the adoption of the Countywide Vision, which calls for the creation of a “complete county”, the Board adopted the County paradigm and job statements in 2012.

                    In 2015, the County of San Bernardino launched an effort to go further than any county or city has ever gone with a general plan by creating a web-based comprehensive “complete county” plan. General plans are almost always strictly rule books for guiding development and growth. The County’s General Plan, last updated in 2007, will go well beyond a traditional general plan to become a comprehensive Countywide Plan that complements and informs the Countywide Vision by taking into account all services—not just land-use planning—provided by County Government, and the unique values and priorities of each unincorporated community.

                    The Countywide Plan serves as a guide for County decision-making, financial planning, and communications. Its web-based format provides a wealth of easily accessible data on how the County operates, and allow independent research using County data and information.

                    The Countywide Plan includes:

                        • A County Policy Plan, which serves in part as the County’s General Plan for the unincorporated areas and also provides guidance for regional county services. The Policy Plan establishes goals and policies for the entire county as well as specific sub regions and communities.
                        • A County Business Plan, which contains governance policies and operational metrics that outline the County’s approach to providing municipal and regional services.
                        • A Regional Issues Forum, which is an online resource for sharing information and resources related to issues confronting the entire county.
                        • A Community Plans Continuum, which articulates what is important to each Community, and for the most part, would be implemented by the Community. Links will also be provided for maps, goals, and policies in the Policy Plan.

                  • Where Did the Goals, Policies, and Land Use Map for My Community’s Plan Go?

                    The existing Community Plan content was used in the development of the new draft Community Plan and Countywide Plan. Goals and policies from the existing community plan, as well as proposed land use changes discussed during the community workshops, will be considered for inclusion in the County Policy Plan, a component of the Countywide Plan. The Land Use Map will be adopted as part of the County Policy Plan. The content of the draft Community Plan focuses on those actions identified by the community that the community is willing to take to make desired changes to their community. The County Policy Plan and the Community Plans will both be web-based, with adoption of the Countywide Plan in late 2018.

                  • What is the Community Development Toolkit?

                    The County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department is creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.





                • Our Community


                    Joshua Tree

                  • Who We Are

                    There is a uniqueness to Joshua Tree that sets it apart from other High Desert communities. The combination of people, culture, history, and landscape give the community a “sense of place” as distinctive as its namesake national park. Above all else, the people of Joshua Tree value the natural beauty of the desert and strive for a harmonious relationship with the environment. This translates into a strong desire to preserve the rural desert lifestyle for its spaciousness and tranquility, and for growth in the community to occur in a measured and sustainable way. The community prides itself on being the gateway to Joshua Tree National Park and recognizes the symbiotic relationship it has with the park. Although life in the Mojave Desert can present many challenges, Joshua Tree is committed to ensuring that the community has excellent public infrastructure and full access to essential services.

                    Strengths and Opportunities

                    Community workshops were conducted in each community as part of the engagement process. In addition, input was gathered through the Countywide Plan website. As part of the process, participants defined the strengths of and opportunities for their community. The word cloud below was created using the input provided during the Strengths, Opportunities, Values and Aspirations exercises and served as part of the base information utilized to develop the Focus and Action Statements of the Community Plan. The word cloud quickly informed participants of key issues and focus areas that could be addressed in the plan. The more a word or phrase was articulated, the larger the word appears in the cloud. The full results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats gathered as a part of the engagement process are found in the Community Profile.

                    Joshua Tree Word Cloud

                  • Community Values

                    The Values are those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important in the lives of its residents and businesses. A community’s values are an important consideration in shaping its aspirations, focus and actions.

                     

                    Natural Beauty

                    Joshua Tree residents value the natural beauty of the surrounding desert environment.


                    Responsible Tourism

                    Joshua Tree residents value the economic and cultural benefits of tourism to Joshua Tree National Park balanced with maintaining a respectful connection with nature.


                    Cultural Reputation

                    Joshua Tree residents value the community’s reputation as an educational, artistic, and cultural center with abundant social and cultural amenities.


                    Sustainable Focus

                    Joshua Tree residents value dark skies and the natural desert with a focus on sustainability and diversity.


                    Vibrant Atmosphere

                    Joshua Tree residents value the diverse group of local businesses, artists, and personalities who make life in the community vibrant and unique.

                  • Community Profile

                    The community profile is a summary of the social, cultural, economic, and historic dimensions of Joshua Tree. It presents data collected through secondary sources to inform future actions. The profile, together with future studies and information gathered from residents highlights essential facets and “tell the story” of the Joshua Tree Community.

                    Click here for a PDF version of the complete Community Profile.




                • Our Aspirations

                  Joshua Tree Workshop #2

                  The Aspirations Statement is a written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Focus Statements and Action Statements are fully implemented. This is a long term view of 10 to 20 years. The Aspirations Statement serves as a foundation for developing Community Focus Statements and Action Statements.


                  • 1. A Model Community for Sustainability

                    Our community is at to the forefront of the sustainability movement by focusing on healthy and balanced living practices that do not negatively impact the surrounding desert environment. Local community groups organize incentive programs for homes that convert to point-of-use solar units. Additionally, monthly programs are held for the community to educate residents and businesses on ways to recycle, compost, and reduce water consumption. Joshua Tree continues its efforts to preserve the desert ecosystem and maintain a harmonious relationship with the environment.


                  • 2. Responsible and Respectful Growth and Development

                    Growth and development within Joshua Tree progresses at a measured pace, with each project reviewed by a committee of residents and local stakeholders. Our community has an adopted set of design guidelines for the community to maintain the appearance, culture, and “Desert Funk” style of the area. We understand that growth is important in order to capture revenue from tourism to Joshua Tree National Park and to help the community continue to thrive. The design review committee and new guidelines help the new businesses and residences fit in seamlessly with the existing community and add value to the area.


                  • 3. A Gateway to Nature

                    The community of Joshua Tree distinguishes itself as a well-known gateway to Joshua Tree National Park. Economic development in the area meets the needs of both residents and tourists, and many of our local businesses are focused on promoting the natural environment around us, whether through the sale of outdoor gear or services such as hiking or climbing guides. We also have a signage and wayfinding program to promote the community and help visitors better navigate the area.


                  • 4. Fostering Local Businesses with Rural Desert Character

                    Joshua Tree is a community whose character is defined in part by local mom and pop shops The Joshua Tree Chamber of Commerce, with advice from the County, developed a streamlined process that serves all the needs of both new and existing small-business owners to start and retain new businesses. The local Chamber of Commerce works with the surrounding chambers of Yucca Valley and Twentynine Palms to coordinate business attraction, marketing, and business support activities, which benefits all three areas.


                  • 5. Enhancing Community Services

                    Growth and development in Joshua Tree has enhanced community services, such as education, fire, and law enforcement. Joshua Tree’s K–12 school system is a highly competitive learning environment whose students have access to the technology and resources needed for them to excel. Additional sheriff’s patrols increase safety and better serve the larger population and increased numbers of visitors to Joshua Tree National Park.




                • Our Action Plans

                  Action Plans

                  Click here for a PDF version of the compiled Public Review Draft Joshua Tree Action Plans.

                  The Action Plans consist of:

                        • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                        • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                        • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

                  Focus Statements and Action Statements

                  Each Focus Statement is listed below. The Action Statements display under the corresponding Focus Statement. Expanded discussions of each Action Statement are included in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

                  The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

                  Focus Statements


                  • A. Preserve the desert ecosystem, its natural beauty, and the community’s harmonious relationship with the environment

                    Action Statements

                    A1. Partner with organizations such as Mojave Desert Land Trust to conserve natural desert habitats and wildlife corridors and to protect native plants and animals.

                    A2. Promote water conservation as an essential part of living in the desert.

                    A3. Develop a master plan to connect existing designated open spaces with Joshua Tree National Park.

                    A4. Promote respect for local ecosystems and be stewards of the environment.

                    A5. Promote smart, sustainable, low-impact growth and development.

                    A6. Encourage small-scale rooftop solar rather than large industrial solar farms.


                  • B. Maintain the rural desert lifestyle and character

                    Action Statements

                    B1. Establish a welcome program to greet new residents, educate them on the unique desert experience, and offer them information regarding the community.

                    B2. Prepare a landscaping and lighting guide to help current and new residents either install or modify landscaping and lighting to meet the needs of the desert landscape and dark sky regulations.

                    B3. Develop community-based design guidelines that explain the “Desert Funk” design style that helps define the unique character of Joshua Tree. The guidelines should focus on design concepts for the downtown area and include both residential and commercial development guidelines to assist designers in meeting community expectations.

                    B4. Combine a harmonious vibe of peace and spaciousness with community activities to bring Joshua Tree’s diverse population together.


                  • C. Become a model gateway community to Joshua Tree National Park

                    Action Statements

                    C1. Enhance the community’s identity as “The Gateway to Joshua Tree National Park.”

                    C2. Establish a plan to create a vibrant downtown with more restaurants, cafes, bakeries, craft shops, galleries, and the like.

                    C3. Coordinate with business and property owners to develop a series of guidelines for wayfinding and advertising signage that embraces the community’s design vision while providing direction and information to both residents and visitors.

                    C4. Establish a downtown business improvement district (BID), or similar financing mechanism, to assist in developing improvements to the gateway.

                    C5. Partner with SBCTA and Caltrans to advocate and seek funding for pedestrian and parking enhancements to provide a safer environment for residents and visitors on Twentynine Palms Highway (SR 62), in particular, through downtown Joshua Tree.

                    C6. Construct a lighted crosswalk at the intersection of Twentynine Palms highway and Sunset Road.

                    C7. Construct pedestrian refuge areas at key intersections to aid pedestrians crossing Twentynine Palms Highway.

                    C8. Collaborate with businesses and property owners to discourage Caltrans from widening of Twentynine Palms Highway.

                    C9. Establish a parking management plan organized by the Joshua Tree Chamber of Commerce within the downtown/gateway area.

                    C10. Locate open spaces such as courts, plazas, and park areas near and around businesses to encourage visitors to stop in the core downtown/gateway area.


                  • D. Grow the local economy in a manner consistent with the rural desert character

                    Action Statements

                    D1. Enhance ecotourism by creating an economic development and marketing strategy that promotes the local environment and associated activities.

                    D2. Encourage the sustainable development of lodging for Joshua Tree National Park visitors and advocate for responsible short-term rental (e.g., Airbnb) operations.

                    D3. Support local business ownership and investment while attracting new entrepreneurs that share similar values with the community.

                    D4. Partner with local educational institutions such as Copper Mountain College to develop or expand educational programs that lead to higher wage employment.

                    D5. Support local job training opportunities for area teens.

                    D6. Explore opportunities to strengthen the Joshua Tree Chamber of Commerce, partner with the Yucca Valley Chamber of Commerce and the Twentynine Palms Chamber of Commerce to coordinate business attraction, marketing, and business support activities.


                  • E. Improve roads and other public infrastructure throughout the community while preserving the desert landscape and rural character

                    Action Statements

                    E1. Design a trail system for both bicycles and pedestrians, connecting the downtown with surrounding open space and communities.

                    E2. Establish desert road development standards that downplay the need for urban street improvements such as street lighting, curb and gutter, and sidewalks except as needed for safety.

                    E3. Encourage rapid maintenance of key roadways immediately following storm events.

                    E4. Embrace the Complete Streets approach to the construction and operation of the community’s transportation network, balancing the needs of all modes of travel.

                    E5. Manage off-highway vehicle (OHV) use within the community boundaries through creation of an educational campaign to better educate OHV users on existing laws and legal use of their vehicles.


                  • F. Improve the delivery of essential services to the community

                    Action Statements

                    F1. Advocate for increased police patrols.

                    F2. Collaborate with the Morongo Basin communities on a regional plan to improve health care services and facilities in the area, emphasizing accessible, state-of-the-art care.

                    F3. Collaborate with the Morongo Basin Transit Authority to improve bus routing.


                  • G. Reinforce the sense of “community”

                    Action Statements

                    G1. Prioritize and develop community recreational facilities such as a community cultural center, an open space venue for live performances, and/or a dog park.

                    G2. Advocate for substantial improvements to the Joshua Tree Library.

                    G3. Organize more community events and activities to bring Joshua Tree’s diverse population together.

                    G4. Embrace the Transition Movement, which aims to increase community self-sufficiency to reduce the potential effects of peak oil, climate change, and economic instability.

                    G5. Partner with appropriate agencies in pursuing grant and other financing opportunities to fund local improvement projects.

                    G6. Promote the unique artistic culture of Joshua Tree.


                  • H. Strive for greater independence and self-government

                    Action Statements

                    H1. Reestablish the Joshua Tree Municipal Advisory Council to more specifically address the issues affecting the community.

                    H2. Explore the potential for incorporation.


                  Action Plan Matrices

                  The Action Plan Matrix for each Action Statement listed above can be found in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

                  How to Implement the Action Plans

                  The Action Plans provide a general organization of the action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement. The Community may want to meet to identify the top three to five priority Action Statements to work on first. Some of these may be those actions that the community believes could be completed quickly and easily. Completion of one Action Statement will provide the community and local groups with the motivation to move forward with another Action Statement.

                  Once an Action Statement is selected for implementation, the Community identifies a champion for that Action Statement to initiate activities, identify those responsible for carrying out action steps, identify and secure resources that will be required, and develop a timeline. While suggested champions and action steps are included in the plan document, each community should develop more specific assignments based upon available community resources such as volunteers, community groups and organizations. This step of planning for implementation is an important step necessary to help ensure successful implementation.

                  Potential resources are identified for each Action Statement. These may be guides on implementation, case studies of how other communities have implemented similar projects, sources of potential external funding, and County agencies that can provide guidance and advice.

                  The Action Plans are Not Set in Stone

                  The Action Plans are to be used to guide community actions and are not “set in stone”. Champions and Action Leaders are suggestions, but your community has a better idea of the best Champion for individual actions. The Action process is a general set of tasks that can be modified by the Champion, Action Leaders and/or Action Teams to best fit your community. The community should feel free to make changes and find alternatives for completing actions.

                  The Community Development Toolkit

                  San Bernardino County Land Use Services is in the process of creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.



                • Material in this section will be added as it is completed with community input. Click on each item for more information and a link to download the material.