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Eight Regional Meetings | October 2017

Download PDF version of the event flyer here .

Open House Events


The County is hosting eight open houses in October:

1. Yucaipa
October 4th | 10 AM to 1 PM

Yucaipa Community Center
34900 Oak Glen Road
Yucaipa, CA 92399

2. Crestline
October 4th | 5 to 8 PM

San Moritz Lodge
24640 San Moritz Drive
Crestline, CA 92325

3. Barstow
October 5th | 4:30 to 7:30 PM

Barstow Senior Citizen Center
555 Melissa Avenue
Barstow, CA 92311

4. Rialto
October 6th | 11 AM to 3 PM

County Behavioral Health Department
850 E. Foothill Blvd
Rialto, CA 92376

5. Ontario
October 10th | 3 to 7 PM

Ontario Senior Center
225 E. B Street
Ontario, CA 91764

6. Joshua Tree
October 11th | 5 to 8 PM

Joshua Tree Community Center
6171 Sunburst Street
Joshua Tree, CA 92252

7. Hesperia
October 12th | 10 AM to 1 PM

Lime Street Community Center
16292 Lime Street
Hesperia, CA 92345

8. Big Bear Lake
October 12th | 5 to 8 PM

Big Bear Valley Senior Center
42651 Big Bear Blvd
Big Bear Lake, CA 92314

Can’t attend one of these dates?

Click here to take the online survey here .

Click here to visit the online open house materials and leave your thoughts about the Countywide Plan. 

Open House Highlights


At each open house, the County will present progress on the Countywide Plan and discuss your thoughts on a variety of topics including:

  • Land use (current & proposed)
  • Draft Community Plans
  • Public safety & security
  • Economic & social resources
  • Health & wellness
  • Circulation & mobility
  • Natural resources & hazards
  • Public & social services
  • Environmental justice
  • Web-based maps

Open House Activities


Each regional open house will feature many ways to participate, including:

  • Complete surveys
  • Fill out comment cards
  • Review the proposed Land Use Plan
  • Review draft Community Plans
  • Explore web-based maps
  • Draw at the kids coloring station
  • Take pictures at the selfie station

These events are part of an ongoing outreach process that has included over 66 community meetings. Thank you for getting involved in improving your community and county!

Draft Detailed Community Plans now available for review!

See the results of your hard work.  Come take a look at this new resource for your community to steer its own course toward a better future.

In 2016 and 2017, over 1,700 people from over 50 communities embarked on a planning process to develop new system of Community Plans.

During 66 workshops, the public identified values, aspirations, ideas for action, and priorities unique to each community area.  The Community Plans include a set of actions that can be initiated by residents, businesses, property owners, local groups, etc. to improve their community.

Click here to download a PDF flyer about the Draft Detailed Community Plans and the public review process.

Draft Community Plans can now be viewed online for the communities listed below. Draft Framework and Foundation Plans will be available by October.

Public Feedback

Thank you for participating in the Community Plan update process!  After viewing your draft community plan, the County welcomes your feedback and comments submitted via:

  • Online through the submittal area on each draft community plan’s webpage
  • Email
  • Attendance at one of the Regional Open Houses scheduled for October 2017 (notice and flyer coming soon)
  • U.S. mail:
    County of San Bernardino
    Land Use Services
    Attn: Suzanne Peterson
    385 North Arrowhead Avenue, 1st Floor
    San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

Draft Lake Arrowhead Communities Action Guide

  • Introduction
  • Our Community
  • Our Aspirations
  • Our Action Plans
  • Maps & Links

  • Introduction

    Lake Arrowhead

    In 2016, the communities embarked on a new community planning process. Three public workshops, open to any community resident, or business, or property owner, addressed strengths and weaknesses of the communities, the communities’ values, and what the communities aspire to be in the future. Participants brainstormed areas of focus and actions to help the communities move forward to achieve its aspirations.

    In October 2017, the initial results were released for public review as a draft community plan. In response to public comments, the plans were renamed Community Action Guides. This name change along with a first set of revisions that resulted from public review were incorporated into the Draft Community Action Guide, released for public review in August 2018. The 2019 Draft Community Action Guide reflects changes made in response to public comments on the 2018 Draft.

    The results are presented as the Draft Communities Action Guide through this webpage, including the additional tabs above.

    The final format of the Communities Action Guide will be web-based. The PDF version of the Draft Communities Action Guide (linked below) is provided as a courtesy for simplifying public review, but may not be available once the online version of the plan is finalized.

    2019 Revised Draft Communities Action Guide

    2018 Revised Draft Communities Action Guide

    2017 Public Review Draft

    2007 Community Plan Policy Matrix

    This community has an existing Community Plan, adopted in 2007, and intended to guide the future use, character, and independent identity of the community. As part of Countywide Plan, the County is consolidating goals and policies from both the overall 2007 General Plan and the 2007/2013 Community Plans into a single source of policy direction called the County Policy Plan. Consolidating policy into one document alleviates consistency issues and avoids redundancy between the General Plan and Community Plans. As a result, the policy direction is easier to navigate, understand, and implement.

    To enable residents to better understand how the County addressed the existing Community Plan goals and policies in the County Policy Plan and elsewhere, the County created a Policy Matrix that lists each goal and policy from the current Community Plan and where it will be addressed in the future. This matrix was originally released in August 2018, alongside the 2018 Draft Policy Plan and 2018 Revised Draft Community Action Guides. The May 2019 Policy Matrix has been updated to reflect changes released with the 2019 Draft Policy Plan and the 2019 Revised Draft Community Action Guide.

    Policy Matrix for your community’s 2007 Community Plan

    This document was revised after the September 2018 regional meetings based on community input. To see changes to the document since 2018, view the tracked changes version below, in which new text is underlined while deleted text is struck out.

    2019 Policy Matrix showing tracked changes since 2018


    • The Draft 2019 Communities Action Guide for Public Review

      You may use the feedback form on this page to submit your comments online — look to the left or scroll down to the bottom depending on your device.

      In addition, you may e-mail comments to CommunityPlans@lus.sbcounty.gov or submit written comments by mail to:

      County of San Bernardino
      Land Use Services Department
      385 N. Arrowhead Ave., 1st Floor
      San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

      This Draft Communities Action Guide was created by the communities members who attended workshops, provided comments online or sent in written comments. It is written in the words of those participating in the public engagement process. Therefore, the communities’ action guide retains the voice and future image of the communities presented by the communities members participating in the public engagement process.

      The final format of the Communities Action Guide will be web-based. The PDF version of the Draft Communities Action Guide is provided as a courtesy for simplifying public review, but may not be available once the online version of the plan is finalized.

    • How to Use This Communities Action Guide

      Purpose and Approach

      Overall, the Communities Action Guides are a framework for communities to create the future character and independent identity, as identified in the workshops with communities values and aspirations, through completion of a communities action plan. As stated at the communities workshops, the new Communities Action Guides replace any existing 2007/2013 Community Plans, with a greater focus on community self-reliance, grass-roots action, and implementation. Goals, policies, land use, and infrastructure decisions are addressed in the Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan. The County Development Code will still regulate zoning and land development.

      The Communities Action Guide is strategic in nature and provides clear Focus Statements and Action Statements identified by the communities that led to creation of an Action Plan that can be implemented at the grass-roots level within each of the communities. Some actions may require assistance by a County department, but the communities will take the lead in moving the action forward, identifying funding or scheduling meetings or requesting information from specific County departments.

      A detailed implementation plan and training module will be set up by the County to guide communities in identifying Champions, setting up Action Teams, contacting County departments and answering questions. In addition, the County’s role will be clarified. This information will be included on the website for easy reference by communities.

      Plan Organization

      The Communities Action Guide is organized into three main sections, the communities’ Values, communities’ Aspirations, and Action Plans.

      VALUES – Those shared assets, principles, standards, mores and in the judgement of the communities, what is important to the lives of its residents and businesses. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

      Communities Values are listed under the Our Community tab.

      ASPIRATIONS– A written narrative illustrating the communities’ desired look and function once the Communities Action Guide is fully implemented. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. It is written as if the communities’ desired changes have already occurred. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

      Communities Aspirations are listed under the Our Aspirations tab.

      ACTION PLANS– The action plans consist of:

      • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Communities’ aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
      • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
      • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

      The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the guide are not prioritized. It is up to the communities to select the three to five priority Action Statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related Action Plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement. The Champions and Action Teams should review the Action Statement, Benchmark, and Action Steps. They may even hold a public meeting to get additional input before starting implementation of a specific Action Statement. Changes may be made as new input is received.

      Action Plans are listed under the Our Action Plans tab.

      The Action Guide as a Living Document

      The Communities Action Guides and the Countywide Plan are designed to be web-based and therefore will be easily updated. The Communities Action Guide is intended to be championed and implemented by the Communities. The Focus Statements and Action Statement within the guide were created through public engagement workshops by community participants.

      The guide is meant as a way to organize activities and provide overall direction to move the Communitiesorward. The plan should never be considered to be written in stone, but should be malleable as the needs of the Communities continue to change. Focus Statements and Action Statements should be changed and amended as Action Statements are completed or new priorities take their place.

      The Communities should consider reviewing its guide annually to celebrate what was accomplished and make changes to the guide, as necessary, to ensure it is a relevant work plan. Communities should report back to the County as they complete actions to ensure their online guide is updated with success stories included on their website and to ensure their Action Plans are updated reflecting completed actions. As communities complete their Action Plans, the County will determine when to revisit the communities to expand or modify their Action Plans.

    • Relationship to the Countywide Vision and Countywide Plan

      Relationship to Countywide Vision

      The Community Action Guide’s values and goals are specific to each community. However, they are consistent with, build on, and contribute to the Countywide Vision.

      Relationship to Countywide Plan

      In 2010, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors set out to establish a vision for the future of the county as a whole, and subsequently adopted a Countywide Vision in 2011 after two years of input from the communities and the county’s 24 cities and towns. Following the adoption of the Countywide Vision, which calls for the creation of a “complete county”, the Board adopted the County paradigm and job statements in 2012.

      In 2015, the County of San Bernardino launched an effort to go further than any county or city has ever gone with a general plan by creating a web-based comprehensive “complete county” plan. General plans are almost always strictly rule books for guiding development and growth. The County’s General Plan, last updated in 2007, will go well beyond a traditional general plan to become a comprehensive Countywide Plan that complements and informs the Countywide Vision by taking into account all services—not just land-use planning—provided by County Government, and the unique values and priorities of each unincorporated community.

      The Countywide Plan serves as a guide for County decision-making, financial planning, and communications. Its web-based format provides a wealth of easily accessible data on how the County operates, and allow independent research using County data and information.

      The Countywide Plan includes:

      • A County Policy Plan, which serves in part as the County’s General Plan for the unincorporated areas and also provides guidance for regional county services. The Policy Plan establishes goals and policies for the entire county as well as specific sub regions and communities.
      • A County Business Plan, which contains governance policies and operational metrics that outline the County’s approach to providing municipal and regional services.
      • A Regional Issues Forum, which is an online resource for sharing information and resources related to issues confronting the entire county.
      • A Community Planning Continuum of 35 Community Action Guides, which articulates what is important to each Community; sets out an Action Plan based on community input, and for the most part, would be implemented by the community; and provides a Community Profile. Links will also be provided for maps, goals, and policies in the Countywide Plan.

    • Where Did the Goals, Policies, and Land Use Map for My Community’s Plan Go?

      The existing Community Plan content was used in the development of the Communities Action Guide and Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan. Goals and policies from the existing community plan, as well as proposed land use changes discussed during the communities workshops, were considered for inclusion in the County Policy Plan and Land Use Map, components of the Countywide Plan. The Land Use Map will be adopted as part of the County Policy Plan. The content of the Communities Action Guide focuses on those actions identified by the communities that the community members are willing to take to make desired changes to their communities. The County Policy Plan and the Community Action Guides will be web-based, with adoption of the Countywide Plan in 2019.

      To enable residents to better understand how the County addressed the existing Community Plan goals and policies in the County Policy Plan and elsewhere, the County created a Policy Matrix that lists each goal and policy from the current Community Plan and where it will be addressed in the future:

      • Policy Plan: the location for updated goals and policies that apply to unincorporated areas
      • Implementation Plan: the location for actions to be undertaken by the County to implement the Countywide Plan (to be released in 2019)
      • Community Action Guide: the location for actions to be undertaken by community members, in coordination with the County
      • Development Code: detailed standards or regulations that are already addressed in the Development Code or can be considered in the upcoming Development Code update
      • Other: those issues, goals, policies, or actions that have already been accomplished, are outdated, or are no longer a community priority

      Click here to download a Policy Matrix for your community’s 2007 Community Plan

      Click here to visit the webpage for the County Policy Plan

    • What is the Community Development Toolkit?

      The County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department is creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Communities Action Guide.





  • Our Community


      Lake Arrowhead

    • Who We Are

      The Lake Arrowhead communities consist of several mountaintop communities where residents enjoy a tranquil, small-town lifestyle and actively seek the protection and enhancement of the natural mountain environment. Although the slower pace is appreciated, outdoor recreation activities and an active lifestyle are also valued. Residents are actively involved in a variety of community service organizations, are well informed, and depend upon their neighbors. Residents and business owners take great pride in the unique tourist identity of the area, and enjoy positive relationships with tourists by understanding their importance to the local economy. Community members support the reuse of existing buildings, infill development, and revitalization to create a vibrant local economy and tourist industry that maintains the area’s economic well-being. Of primary focus is the attraction of families to the area by providing a vibrant local economy that encourages small local and home-based businesses, encouraging preservation of the natural environment, and providing park and recreational facilities and programs for all ages and abilities.

      Strengths and Opportunities

      Community workshops were conducted in each community as part of the engagement process. In addition, input was gathered through the Countywide Plan website. As part of the process, participants defined the strengths of and opportunities for their community. The word cloud below was created using the input provided during the Strengths, Opportunities, Values and Aspirations exercises and served as part of the base information utilized to develop the Focus and Action Statements of the Community Action Guide. The word cloud quickly informed participants of key issues and focus areas that could be addressed in the guide. The more a word or phrase was articulated, the larger the word appears in the cloud. The full results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats gathered as a part of the engagement process is found in the Community Profile.

      Lake Arrowhead Word Cloud

    • Community Values

      The Values are those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important in the lives of its residents and businesses. A community’s values are an important consideration in shaping its aspirations, focus and actions.

       

      Natural Mountain Environment

      Lake Arrowhead communities residents value the tranquil, small-town lifestyle and natural mountain beauty, including flora/fauna, wildlife, fresh air, clean water, and starry night skies, and proximity to the San Bernardino National Forest.
      High Quality of Life. Lake Arrowhead communities residents value a high quality of life, active lifestyle, and variety of recreation opportunities, while maintaining the slower pace and peacefulness the mountain communities offer.


      Outdoor Recreation

      Lake Arrowhead communities residents value outdoor recreation activities, including Lake Arrowhead, nearby skiing, sledding, snow play, hiking trails, and off-highway vehicles.


      Community Involvement

      Lake Arrowhead communities residents value their communities and are highly active and involved in community service organizations. Residents have a strong sense of community, are informed, and can depend on their neighbors.


      Positive Visitor Relationships

      Lake Arrowhead communities residents value visitors to the community as an important part of the local economy. They enjoy positive relationships with tourists and take great pride in the unique tourist identity of the area.

    • Community Profile

      The community profile is a summary of the social, cultural, economic, and historic dimensions of Lake Arrowhead. It presents data collected through secondary sources to inform future actions. The profile, together with future studies and information gathered from residents highlights essential facets and “tell the story” of the Lake Arrowhead Communities.

      2019 Draft Communities Profile (No changes made)

      2018 Revised Draft Communities Profile

      2017 Public Review Draft Communities Profile




  • Our Aspirations

    Lake Arrowhead Workshop #2

    The Aspirations Statement is a written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Focus Statements and Action Statements are fully implemented. This is a long term view of 10 to 20 years. The Aspirations Statement serves as a foundation for developing Community Focus Statements and Action Statements.


    • 1. Thriving and Protected Natural Mountain Environment

      Residents support protection of the area’s natural environment and mountain character through education and activities, such as community-organized cleanups. Education programs are implemented for residents and visitors to ensure awareness of the importance of the natural environment and understanding of the ways to ensure its protection. The communities also market the area as a unique tourist destination and attract businesses that capitalize on and protect the environment, such as ecotourism.


    • 2. Safe Communities

      Residents and property owners work with each other and the San Bernardino County Fire and Sheriff’s Departments to improve safety within the communities. The need for additional services and equipment continues to be monitored, with services and equipment provided as appropriate. The communities also work with first responders in creating better mapping and directional street signs/markings to navigate the communities during times of emergency.


    • 3. Vibrant Local Economy

      Residents create a vibrant local economy and tourist industry that maintains the area’s economic well-being by supporting the reuse of existing buildings, infill development, and revitalization. Growth of small local businesses and home-based businesses are supported and encouraged. Of primary focus is the attraction and retention of families to the area. Parks and recreational facilities and programs are offered for all ages and abilities. The communities work with local employers, community organizations, and schools to market the area to young families.


    • 4. Improved Access and Transportation Alternatives

      Opportunities to reduce vehicular traffic in the area are reviewed, including a local shuttle/trolley system during peak visitor periods, a regional transportation system, and walking/hiking/cycling paths that connect community nodes and the larger mountain areas. Efforts to implement these alternative means of transportation are under way. The communities also work with the County of San Bernardino and neighboring communities to develop alternative and improved access to and through the mountain communities.




  • Our Action Plans

    Action Plans

    2019 Revised Draft Action Plans

    2018 Revised Draft Action Plans

    2017 Public Review Draft Action Plans

    The Action Plans consist of:

          • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
          • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
          • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

    Focus Statements and Action Statements

    Each Focus Statement is listed below. The Action Statements display under the corresponding Focus Statement. Expanded discussions of each Action Statement are included in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

    The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

    Focus Statements


    • A. Preserve and enhance the unique environmental features of the Lake Arrowhead Communities and surrounding areas

      Action Statements

      A1. Coordinate with the local schools and other organizations to educate youth on the importance of the environment and its protection.

      A2. Identify incentives for landowners to maintain undeveloped property as open space.

      A3. Coordinate with Caltrans to identify opportunities to provide tunnels and wildlife corridors under or over roadways as well as incorporating requirements as part of the development review process.

      A4. Organize community members to participate in the development review process through public hearing meetings and reviewing and commenting on public documents.

      A5. Partner with environmental groups and associations to develop programs, activities, and educational materials that preserve and protect the natural environment.


    • B. Develop and improve parks and recreational facilities and services for all ages

      Action Statements

      B1. Identify recreation needs, including facilities and programs, by working with residents from all age groups and abilities.

      B2. Identify opportunities for joint-use of facilities with the school district to serve recreation needs.

      B3. Coordinate with the San Bernardino County Special Districts to identify improvements at MacKay Park, providing a wider range of age-appropriate facilities, including a senior exercise trail and ballfields.

      B4. Identify opportunities for a variety of recreational activities and amenities such as walking, hiking, horseback riding, biking, off-highway vehicles (OHVs), tennis courts, ballfields, and open space areas.


    • C. Provide quality educational opportunities at all levels

      Action Statements

      C1. Establish partnership for joint use of existing public school infrastructure with universities and junior colleges to provide expanded educational opportunities for residents.

      C2. Investigate the declining enrollment and quality of public schools in the mountain communities through community organizing and involvement.


    • D. Provide a thriving and vibrant local small business environment

      Action Statements

      D1. Encourage local ownership and investment of the Village.

      D2. Coordinate with Caltrans to enhance and change signage on I-215 from “Highland” to “Mountain Resort Communities” or another alternative wording that capitalizes on the mountain areas.

      D3. Establish mountain-wide regional collaborative relationships between employers and high schools and local public or local non-profit junior colleges such as San Bernardino Valley College and Crafton Hills College to offer low-cost credentialing and certification programs to increase educational opportunities for employees to gain job skills.

      D4. Coordinate with the San Bernardino County Economic Development Agency (EDA) and Lake Arrowhead Communities Chamber of Commerce to expand strategies to improve communications with businesses and develop a Business Retention & Expansion (BR&E) program.

      D5. Coordinate with the San Bernardino County Economic Development Agency (EDA) and Lake Arrowhead Communities Chamber of Commerce to establish a marketing plan with incentives to attract new businesses to the area.

      D6. Accommodate permanent residents by developing and implementing a marketing campaign to highlight the values of mountain living for young families focusing on education, family values, community, natural environment, and activities.

      D7. Establish a business appreciation program, including events, webinars, and awards.

      D8. Identify and develop entrepreneurial talent in coordination with existing programs at CSUSB through a coaching program and entrepreneur training program, known as “Economic Gardening”.

      D9. Equip the local Chamber of Commerce to be a one stop shop for help with regulatory permits, financing sources, and serve as ombudsperson with local agencies.

      D10. Partner with the County Economic Development Agency to offer incentive programs for new businesses that move into existing commercial and industrial locations.

      D11. Establish a marketing plan with incentives to encourage home-based businesses.


    • E. Provide economic development opportunities that capitalize on the natural environment, attract visitors, and provide entertainment for residents

      Action Statements

      E1. Establish a marketing strategy to promote the natural environment and associated activities to encourage of ecotourism businesses.

      E2. Investigate opportunities with the Lake Arrowhead Communities Chamber of Commerce, San Bernardino County Special Districts, US Forest Service, and other agencies as appropriate to provide amenities to support visitors to the area such as parking, restrooms, seating areas, open space, and trails that connect key nodes/activity centers.

      E3. Encourage obtaining local designation status (or higher) of historic resources.


    • F. Improve resources to support seasonal visitors and tourist activities in the Lake Arrowhead communities

      Action Statements

      F1. Provide dumpsters and signage that encourages proper disposal of trash in high-traffic visitor areas.

      F2. Investigate opportunities to establish designated sledding areas with parking to avoid visitors establishing quasi-sledding and parking areas.

      F3. Provide signage, maps, and other informational materials that identify trails and amenities.

      F4. Provide programs and marketing materials that educate visitors on the natural environment and importance of its protection in order to foster responsible tourist behavior.

      F5. Establish an education campaign specific for visitors of the Deep Creek area regarding the safe and environmentally-sensitive use of off-highway vehicles (OHV) and hiking and snow play activities.

      F6. Provide centralized parking with shuttles and pedestrian paths that connect key commercial and recreational activity areas to reduce vehicle use and trips.

      F7. Partner with the US Forest Service to provide information materials and services focused on hiking trails, fire cutting permits, camping, and associated activities.


    • G. Improve public safety within the Lake Arrowhead communities

      Action Statements

      G1. Establish a neighborhood watch program that can be implemented throughout the communities.

      G2. Encourage community members to participate in the Citizens on Patrol Program coordinated through the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department.

      G3. Partner with the Sheriff’s Department, US Forest Service, San Bernardino County Fire, local safety experts, and insurance companies to educate property owners on securing homes and businesses.

      G4. Advocate with the US Forest Service to increase staffing and enforcement of forest lands.

      G5. Design and promote education materials to help residents understand what constitutes potential code violations and how to report illegal dumping activities.

      G6. Advocate and coordinate with the County and emergency service providers to create better maps and directional street signs/markings to assist emergency drivers in navigating the communities.


    • H. Maintain roadway infrastructure and improve traffic flow and vehicle safety within the communities

      Action Statements

      H1. Coordinate with the County to identify needed roadway maintenance associated with tree roots.

      H2. Identify opportunities to improve safety and maintenance of private roads.

      H3. Investigate traffic safety at major intersections and turnouts/cutoffs.

      H4. Advocate with the County and Caltrans to regularly maintain public roadways and drainage infrastructure.


    Action Plan Matrices

    The Action Plan Matrix for each Action Statement listed above can be found in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

    How to Implement the Action Plans

    The Action Plans provide a general organization of the action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement. The Community may want to meet to identify the top three to five priority Action Statements to work on first. Some of these may be those actions that the community believes could be completed quickly and easily. Completion of one Action Statement will provide the community and local groups with the motivation to move forward with another Action Statement.

    Once an Action Statement is selected for implementation, the community identifies a Champion for that Action Statement to initiate activities, identify those responsible for carrying out action steps, identify and secure resources that will be required, and develop a timeline. The champion is not responsible for completing the action, but serves to facilitate and guide the Action Team. While suggested action steps are included in the guide, each community should develop more specific assignments based upon available community resources such as volunteers (e.g., individuals, businesses, property owners, etc.), community groups (e.g., chamber of commerce, non-profits, etc.) and organizations (e.g., scouts, community service districts, churches, schools, etc.). This step of planning for implementation is an important first step necessary to help ensure successful implementation.

    Potential resources are identified for each Action Statement. These may be guides on implementation, case studies of how other communities have implemented similar projects, sources of potential external funding, and organizations and agencies that can provide guidance and advice.

    A more detailed Implementation Plan will also be developed. The Implementation Plan will include information about how to inform the County about changes to your Community Action Guide. In addition, the County will want to know when work starts on an Action Statement and when each Action Statement is completed. It is important for the community to celebrate as actions are fulfilled.

    The Action Plans are Not Set in Stone

    The Action Plans are to be used to guide community actions and are not “set in stone”. Champions and Action Leaders are suggestions, but your community has a better idea of the best Champion for individual actions. The Action process is a general set of tasks that can be modified by the Champion, Action Leaders and/or Action Teams to best fit your community. The community should feel free to make changes and find alternatives for completing actions.

    The Community Development Toolkit

    San Bernardino County Land Use Services is in the process of creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Communities’ Action Guide.



  • Material in this section will be added as it is completed with community input. Click on each item for more information and a link to download the material.

    Draft Hilltop Communities Action Guide

    • Introduction
    • Our Community
    • Our Aspirations
    • Our Action Plans
    • Maps & Links

    • Introduction

      Hilltop Green Valley Lake

      In 2016, the communities embarked on a new community planning process. Three public workshops, open to any community resident, or business, or property owner, addressed strengths and weaknesses of the communities, the communities’ values, and what the communities aspire to be in the future. Participants brainstormed areas of focus and actions to help the communities move forward to achieve its aspirations.

      In October 2017, the initial results were released for public review as a draft community plan. In response to public comments, the plans were renamed Community Action Guides. This name change along with a first set of revisions that resulted from public review were incorporated into the Draft Community Action Guide, released for public review in August 2018. The 2019 Draft Community Action Guide reflects changes made in response to public comments on the 2018 Draft.

      The results are presented as the Draft Communities Action Guide through this webpage, including the additional tabs above.

      The final format of the Communities Action Guide will be web-based. The PDF version of the Draft Communities Action Guide (linked below) is provided as a courtesy for simplifying public review, but may not be available once the online version of the plan is finalized.

      2019 Revised Draft Communities Action Guide

      2018 Revised Draft Communities Action Guide

      2017 Public Review Draft

      2007 Community Plan Policy Matrix

      This community has an existing Community Plan, adopted in 2007, and intended to guide the future use, character, and independent identity of the community. As part of Countywide Plan, the County is consolidating goals and policies from both the overall 2007 General Plan and the 2007/2013 Community Plans into a single source of policy direction called the County Policy Plan. Consolidating policy into one document alleviates consistency issues and avoids redundancy between the General Plan and Community Plans. As a result, the policy direction is easier to navigate, understand, and implement.

      To enable residents to better understand how the County addressed the existing Community Plan goals and policies in the County Policy Plan and elsewhere, the County created a Policy Matrix that lists each goal and policy from the current Community Plan and where it will be addressed in the future. This matrix was originally released in August 2018, alongside the 2018 Draft Policy Plan and 2018 Revised Draft Community Action Guides. The May 2019 Policy Matrix has been updated to reflect changes released with the 2019 Draft Policy Plan and the 2019 Revised Draft Community Action Guide.

      Policy Matrix for your community’s 2007 Community Plan

      This document was revised after the September 2018 regional meetings based on community input. To see changes to the document since 2018, view the tracked changes version below, in which new text is underlined while deleted text is struck out.

      Policy Matrix showing tracked changes since 2018


      • The Draft 2019 Communities Action Guide for Public Review

        You may use the feedback form on this page to submit your comments online — look to the left or scroll down to the bottom depending on your device.

        In addition, you may e-mail comments to CommunityPlans@lus.sbcounty.gov or submit written comments by mail to:

        County of San Bernardino
        Land Use Services Department
        385 N. Arrowhead Ave., 1st Floor
        San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

        This Draft Communities Action Guide was created by the communities members who attended workshops, provided comments online or sent in written comments. It is written in the words of those participating in the public engagement process. Therefore, the communities’ action guide retains the voice and future image of the communities presented by the communities members participating in the public engagement process.

        The final format of the Communities Action Guide will be web-based. The PDF version of the Draft Communities Action Guide is provided as a courtesy for simplifying public review, but may not be available once the online version of the plan is finalized.

      • How to Use This Communities Action Guide

        Purpose and Approach

        Overall, the Communities Action Guides are a framework for communities to create the future character and independent identity, as identified in the workshops with communities values and aspirations, through completion of a communities action plan. As stated at the communities workshops, the new Communities Action Guides replace any existing 2007/2013 Community Plans, with a greater focus on community self-reliance, grass-roots action, and implementation. Goals, policies, land use, and infrastructure decisions are addressed in the Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan. The County Development Code will still regulate zoning and land development.

        The Communities Action Guide is strategic in nature and provides clear Focus Statements and Action Statements identified by the communities that led to creation of an Action Plan that can be implemented at the grass-roots level within each of the communities. Some actions may require assistance by a County department, but the communities will take the lead in moving the action forward, identifying funding or scheduling meetings or requesting information from specific County departments.

        A detailed implementation plan and training module will be set up by the County to guide communities in identifying Champions, setting up Action Teams, contacting County departments and answering questions. In addition, the County’s role will be clarified. This information will be included on the website for easy reference by communities.

        Plan Organization

        The Communities Action Guide is organized into three main sections, the communities’ Values, communities’ Aspirations, and Action Plans.

        VALUES – Those shared assets, principles, standards, mores and in the judgement of the communities, what is important to the lives of its residents and businesses. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

        Communities Values are listed under the Our Community tab.

        ASPIRATIONS– A written narrative illustrating the communities’ desired look and function once the Communities Action Guide is fully implemented. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. It is written as if the communities’ desired changes have already occurred. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

        Communities Aspirations are listed under the Our Aspirations tab.

        ACTION PLANS– The action plans consist of:

        • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Communities’ aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
        • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
        • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

        The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the guide are not prioritized. It is up to the communities to select the three to five priority Action Statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related Action Plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement. The Champions and Action Teams should review the Action Statement, Benchmark, and Action Steps. They may even hold a public meeting to get additional input before starting implementation of a specific Action Statement. Changes may be made as new input is received.

        Action Plans are listed under the Our Action Plans tab.

        The Action Guide as a Living Document

        The Communities Action Guides and the Countywide Plan are designed to be web-based and therefore will be easily updated. The Communities Action Guide is intended to be championed and implemented by the Communities. The Focus Statements and Action Statement within the guide were created through public engagement workshops by community participants.

        The guide is meant as a way to organize activities and provide overall direction to move the Communitiesorward. The plan should never be considered to be written in stone, but should be malleable as the needs of the Communities continue to change. Focus Statements and Action Statements should be changed and amended as Action Statements are completed or new priorities take their place.

        The Communities should consider reviewing its guide annually to celebrate what was accomplished and make changes to the guide, as necessary, to ensure it is a relevant work plan. Communities should report back to the County as they complete actions to ensure their online guide is updated with success stories included on their website and to ensure their Action Plans are updated reflecting completed actions. As communities complete their Action Plans, the County will determine when to revisit the communities to expand or modify their Action Plans.

      • Relationship to the Countywide Vision and Countywide Plan

        Relationship to Countywide Vision

        The Community Action Guide’s values and goals are specific to each community. However, they are consistent with, build on, and contribute to the Countywide Vision.

        Relationship to Countywide Plan

        In 2010, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors set out to establish a vision for the future of the county as a whole, and subsequently adopted a Countywide Vision in 2011 after two years of input from the communities and the county’s 24 cities and towns. Following the adoption of the Countywide Vision, which calls for the creation of a “complete county”, the Board adopted the County paradigm and job statements in 2012.

        In 2015, the County of San Bernardino launched an effort to go further than any county or city has ever gone with a general plan by creating a web-based comprehensive “complete county” plan. General plans are almost always strictly rule books for guiding development and growth. The County’s General Plan, last updated in 2007, will go well beyond a traditional general plan to become a comprehensive Countywide Plan that complements and informs the Countywide Vision by taking into account all services—not just land-use planning—provided by County Government, and the unique values and priorities of each unincorporated community.

        The Countywide Plan serves as a guide for County decision-making, financial planning, and communications. Its web-based format provides a wealth of easily accessible data on how the County operates, and allow independent research using County data and information.

        The Countywide Plan includes:

        • A County Policy Plan, which serves in part as the County’s General Plan for the unincorporated areas and also provides guidance for regional county services. The Policy Plan establishes goals and policies for the entire county as well as specific sub regions and communities.
        • A County Business Plan, which contains governance policies and operational metrics that outline the County’s approach to providing municipal and regional services.
        • A Regional Issues Forum, which is an online resource for sharing information and resources related to issues confronting the entire county.
        • A Community Planning Continuum of 35 Community Action Guides, which articulates what is important to each Community; sets out an Action Plan based on community input, and for the most part, would be implemented by the community; and provides a Community Profile. Links will also be provided for maps, goals, and policies in the Countywide Plan.

      • Where Did the Goals, Policies, and Land Use Map for My Community’s Plan Go?

        The existing Community Plan content was used in the development of the Communities Action Guide and Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan. Goals and policies from the existing community plan, as well as proposed land use changes discussed during the communities workshops, were considered for inclusion in the County Policy Plan and Land Use Map, components of the Countywide Plan. The Land Use Map will be adopted as part of the County Policy Plan. The content of the Communities Action Guide focuses on those actions identified by the communities that the community members are willing to take to make desired changes to their communities. The County Policy Plan and the Community Action Guides will be web-based, with adoption of the Countywide Plan in 2019.

        To enable residents to better understand how the County addressed the existing Community Plan goals and policies in the County Policy Plan and elsewhere, the County created a Policy Matrix that lists each goal and policy from the current Community Plan and where it will be addressed in the future:

        • Policy Plan: the location for updated goals and policies that apply to unincorporated areas
        • Implementation Plan: the location for actions to be undertaken by the County to implement the Countywide Plan (to be released in 2019)
        • Community Action Guide: the location for actions to be undertaken by community members, in coordination with the County
        • Development Code: detailed standards or regulations that are already addressed in the Development Code or can be considered in the upcoming Development Code update
        • Other: those issues, goals, policies, or actions that have already been accomplished, are outdated, or are no longer a community priority

        Click here to download a Policy Matrix for your community’s 2007 Community Plan

        Click here to visit the webpage for the County Policy Plan

      • What is the Community Development Toolkit?

        The County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department is creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Communities Action Guide.





    • Our Community

        Hilltop

      • Who We Are

        The Hilltop communities consist of several mountaintop communities where residents enjoy a tranquil, small-town lifestyle while supporting additional economic development opportunities that will capitalize on the natural environment, attract visitors, and provide entertainment for residents. Residents and business owners support a thriving destination village for outdoor activities during all four seasons, while strongly seeking preservation and enhancement of the unique mountain environment. Residents are actively involved in local and regional affairs and activities and regularly participate in community and social organizations that enhance the well-being of the communities. Of primary focus is the attraction of full-time families to the area by providing high-quality education and employment opportunities.

        Strengths and Opportunities

        Community workshops were conducted in each community as part of the engagement process. In addition, input was gathered through the Countywide Plan website. As part of the process, participants defined the strengths of and opportunities for their community. The word cloud below was created using the input provided during the Strengths, Opportunities, Values and Aspirations exercises and served as part of the base information utilized to develop the Focus and Action Statements of the Community Action Guide. The word cloud quickly informed participants of key issues and focus areas that could be addressed in the guide. The more a word or phrase was articulated, the larger the word appears in the cloud. The full results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats gathered as a part of the engagement process is found in the Community Profile.

        Hilltop Word Cloud

      • Community Values

        The Values are those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important in the lives of its residents and businesses. A community’s values are an important consideration in shaping its aspirations, focus and actions.

         

        Family and Community Focus

        Hilltop communities residents value family and community, where neighbors know each other and look out for one another, and are actively involved in various community and social organizations.


        Natural Mountain Environment

        Hilltop communities residents value the small-town character and the natural environment, including habitat, wildlife, air quality, clean air, and the tranquility of the mountains.


        Recreation and Outdoor Activities

        Hilltop communities residents value recreation and outdoor activities, including skiing, snow play, sledding, hiking, and other activities that encourage tourism and allow for active lifestyles.


        Positive Locals and Tourists Relationships

        Hilltop communities residents value and support tourism and the economic contribution tourists make to local businesses and services, including maintaining the necessary infrastructure, services, businesses, and activities to support tourism.

      • Community Profile

        The community profile is a summary of the social, cultural, economic, and historic dimensions of Hilltop. It presents data collected through secondary sources to inform future actions. The profile, together with future studies and information gathered from residents highlights essential facets and “tell the story” of the Hilltop Communities.

        2019 Revised Draft Communities Profile

        2018 Revised Draft Communities Profile

        2017 Public Review Draft Communities Profile




    • Our Aspirations

      Hilltop Workshop#1

      The Aspirations Statement is a written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Focus Statements and Action Statements are fully implemented. This is a long term view of 10 to 20 years. The Aspirations Statement serves as a foundation for developing Community Focus Statements and Action Statements.


      • 1. Protected Natural Environment

        The communities continue to protect, enhance, and enjoy the natural environment. Marketing and educational materials are prepared to inform residents and tourists of the variety of opportunities to enjoy the natural environment and the importance of environmental protection.


      • 2. Safe and Thriving Communities That Attract Families

        Our communities are safe, with high quality education and employment opportunities that attract full-time families to the area. Residents and business owners support programs and improvements that foster a sustainable, thriving, and active community, including improved education, home-based businesses, marketing the area for tourism, and added infrastructure to support these activities. The communities also partner with the San Bernardino County Fire and Sheriff’s departments to identify safety concerns and implement solutions.


      • 3. Thriving Destination Village

        Residents work to make Running Springs a thriving destination village for outdoor activities during all seasons. The provision of recreation amenities and programming for all ages and abilities is a primary focus. The communities work together to provide recreational activities and infrastructure, such as hiking/biking/walking trails and sledding and snow play areas, and to attract ecotourism businesses that complement protection of the natural environment.


      • 4. Maintained Involvement in Local and Regional Affairs

        Residents of the Hilltop communities are actively involved in local and regional affairs and activities. Involvement in community and social organizations that enhance the well-being of the communities is a primary focus. Residents continue to seek opportunities for collaboration with government agencies to express the communities’ needs and wants and to ensure the Hilltop communities are being considered in the decision-making process.




    • Our Action Plans

      Action Plans

      2019 Revised Draft Action Plans

      2018 Revised Draft Action Plans

      2017 Public Review Draft Action Plans

      The Action Plans consist of:

            • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
            • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
            • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

      Focus Statements and Action Statements

      Each Focus Statement is listed below. The Action Statements display under the corresponding Focus Statement. Expanded discussions of each Action Statement are included in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

      The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

      Focus Statements


      • A. Provide economic development opportunities that capitalize on the natural environment, attract visitors, and provide entertainment for residents

        Action Statements

        A1. Establish a marketing strategy to promote the natural environment and associated activities to encourage the eco-tourism businesses (e.g. snow-related, parasailing, off-highway vehicle (OHV) trails, hiking, etc.).

        A2. Provide amenities to support visitors to the area such as parking, restrooms, seating areas, open space, trails connecting key nodes/activity centers, and a visitor information center/kiosks.

        A3. Coordinate with local businesses, community groups, and organizations to support an arts and theatre program with the potential for hosting an annual festival.


      • B. Reduce the impacts associated with seasonal visitors and tourist activities

        Action Statements

        B1. Provide dumpsters and signage that encourages proper disposal of trash in high-traffic visitor areas.

        B2. Investigate opportunities to establish designated sledding areas with parking to avoid visitors establishing undesignated sledding and parking areas.

        B3. Provide signage, maps, and other informational materials that identify trails and amenities.

        B4. Provide readily available programs and marketing materials that educate visitors on the natural environment and importance of its protection in order to foster responsible tourist behavior.

        B5: Advocate with the National Forest Service (NFS) to provide snow play/recreation areas and parking that does not impact the environment.

        B6. Establish a strategy/implementation plan for large events that proactively considers and responds to challenges associated with a large influx of visitors at one time.

        B7. Provide centralized parking with shuttles and pedestrian paths that connect key commercial recreational activity areas to reduce vehicle use and trips.


      • C. Improve mobility and reduce vehicle trips through the development of multi-purpose trails that connect key nodes/activity areas within and between the communities

        Action Statements

        C1. Construct trails for all users that connect neighborhoods with commercial/business areas and key activity areas, such as schools, parks, and community centers.

        C2. Identify opportunities to extend existing trails or modify existing trails to serve multiple uses.

        C3. Coordinate with the Rim of the World Recreation & Park District to implement the Active Transportation Plan.


      • D. Preserve the unique natural environment

        Action Statements

        D1. Coordinate with the local schools and other youth organizations to develop a program focused on educating children regarding the natural environment and its protection.

        D2. Establish a marketing campaign that promotes the mountain communities and educates visitors on the importance of protecting the natural environment.

        D3. Establish targeted clean-ups within less urbanized/forest areas at least two times per year.


      • E. Improve the appearance of the community

        Action Statements

        E1. Establish a compatible/unifying theme for downtown areas and businesses.

        E2. Encourage property owners to maintain and improve their properties (e.g., new paint, façade improvements, trash/debris clean-up).

        E3. Organize a community clean-up to be held at least two times a year.

        E4. Establish a social media campaign to solicit community involvement in preserving and enhancing the community.

        E5. Establish a façade and sign improvement program.


      • F. Provide a thriving and vibrant local small business environment

        Action Statements

        F1. Coordinate with the San Bernardino County Economic Development Agency (EDA) and Running Springs Area Chamber of Commerce to expand strategies to improve communications with business and develop Business Retention & Expansion (BR&E) program.

        F2. Establish a marketing plan with incentives to attract new businesses to the area.

        F3. Attract and retain permanent residents by developing and implementing a marketing campaign to highlight the values of mountain living for young families focusing on education, family values, community, natural environment, and activities.

        F4. Create a business appreciation program, including events, webinars, and awards.

        F5. Identify and develop entrepreneurial talent through a coaching program and entrepreneur training program, known as “Economic Gardening.”

        F6. Equip the local Chamber of Commerce to be a one stop shop for help with regulatory permits, financing sources, and serve as ombudsperson with local agencies.

        F7. Establish a marketing plan with incentives to encourage home-based businesses.


      • G. Provide quality educational opportunities at all levels

        Action Statements

        G1. Establish mountain-wide partnerships for joint use of existing Public School infrastructure with universities and junior colleges to provide expanded educational opportunities for residents.

        G2. Investigate the declining enrollment and quality of public schools in the mountain communities through community organizing and involvement (mountain-wide).


      • H. Improve public safety

        Action Statements

        H1. Establish a neighborhood watch program that can be implemented throughout the communities.

        H2. Encourage community members to participate in the Citizens on Patrol Program coordinated through the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department.

        H3. Partner with the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, United States Forest Service, San Bernardino County Fire, local safety experts, insurance companies to educate property owners on securing homes and businesses to deter crime and make properties safe.


      Action Plan Matrices

      The Action Plan Matrix for each Action Statement listed above can be found in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

      How to Implement the Action Plans

      The Action Plans provide a general organization of the action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement. The Community may want to meet to identify the top three to five priority Action Statements to work on first. Some of these may be those actions that the community believes could be completed quickly and easily. Completion of one Action Statement will provide the community and local groups with the motivation to move forward with another Action Statement.

      Once an Action Statement is selected for implementation, the community identifies a Champion for that Action Statement to initiate activities, identify those responsible for carrying out action steps, identify and secure resources that will be required, and develop a timeline. The champion is not responsible for completing the action, but serves to facilitate and guide the Action Team. While suggested action steps are included in the guide, each community should develop more specific assignments based upon available community resources such as volunteers (e.g., individuals, businesses, property owners, etc.), community groups (e.g., chamber of commerce, non-profits, etc.) and organizations (e.g., scouts, community service districts, churches, schools, etc.). This step of planning for implementation is an important first step necessary to help ensure successful implementation.

      Potential resources are identified for each Action Statement. These may be guides on implementation, case studies of how other communities have implemented similar projects, sources of potential external funding, and organizations and agencies that can provide guidance and advice.

      A more detailed Implementation Plan will also be developed. The Implementation Plan will include information about how to inform the County about changes to your Community Action Guide. In addition, the County will want to know when work starts on an Action Statement and when each Action Statement is completed. It is important for the community to celebrate as actions are fulfilled.

      The Action Plans are Not Set in Stone

      The Action Plans are to be used to guide community actions and are not “set in stone”. Champions and Action Leaders are suggestions, but your community has a better idea of the best Champion for individual actions. The Action process is a general set of tasks that can be modified by the Champion, Action Leaders and/or Action Teams to best fit your community. The community should feel free to make changes and find alternatives for completing actions.

      The Community Development Toolkit

      San Bernardino County Land Use Services is in the process of creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Communities’ Action Guide.



    • Material in this section will be added as it is completed with community input. Click on each item for more information and a link to download the material.

      Draft Crest Forest Communities Action Guide

      • Introduction
      • Our Community
      • Our Aspirations
      • Our Action Plans
      • Maps & Links

      • Introduction

        Crest Forest

        In 2016, the communities embarked on a new community planning process. Three public workshops, open to any community resident, or business, or property owner, addressed strengths and weaknesses of the communities, the communities’ values, and what the communities aspire to be in the future. Participants brainstormed areas of focus and actions to help the communities move forward to achieve its aspirations.

        In October 2017, the initial results were released for public review as a draft community plan. In response to public comments, the plans were renamed Community Action Guides. This name change along with a first set of revisions that resulted from public review were incorporated into the Draft Community Action Guide, released for public review in August 2018. The 2019 Draft Community Action Guide reflects changes made in response to public comments on the 2018 Draft.

        The results are presented as the Draft Communities Action Guide through this webpage, including the additional tabs above.

        The final format of the Communities Action Guide will be web-based. The PDF version of the Draft Communities Action Guide (linked below) is provided as a courtesy for simplifying public review, but may not be available once the online version of the plan is finalized.

        2019 Revised Draft Communities Action Guide

        2018 Revised Draft Communities Action Guide

        2017 Public Review Draft

        2007 Community Plan Policy Matrix

        This community has an existing Community Plan, adopted in 2007, and intended to guide the future use, character, and independent identity of the community. As part of Countywide Plan, the County is consolidating goals and policies from both the overall 2007 General Plan and the 2007/2013 Community Plans into a single source of policy direction called the County Policy Plan. Consolidating policy into one document alleviates consistency issues and avoids redundancy between the General Plan and Community Plans. As a result, the policy direction is easier to navigate, understand, and implement.

        To enable residents to better understand how the County addressed the existing Community Plan goals and policies in the County Policy Plan and elsewhere, the County created a Policy Matrix that lists each goal and policy from the current Community Plan and where it will be addressed in the future. This matrix was originally released in August 2018, alongside the 2018 Draft Policy Plan and 2018 Revised Draft Community Action Guides. The May 2019 Policy Matrix has been updated to reflect changes released with the 2019 Draft Policy Plan and the 2019 Revised Draft Community Action Guide.

        Policy Matrix for your community’s 2007 Community Plan

        This document was revised after the September 2018 regional meetings based on community input. To see changes to the document since 2018, view the tracked changes version below, in which new text is underlined while deleted text is struck out.

        Policy Matrix showing tracked changes since 2018


        • The Draft 2019 Communities Action Guide for Public Review

          You may use the feedback form on this page to submit your comments online — look to the left or scroll down to the bottom depending on your device.

          In addition, you may e-mail comments to CommunityPlans@lus.sbcounty.gov or submit written comments by mail to:

          County of San Bernardino
          Land Use Services Department
          385 N. Arrowhead Ave., 1st Floor
          San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

          This Draft Communities Action Guide was created by the communities members who attended workshops, provided comments online or sent in written comments. It is written in the words of those participating in the public engagement process. Therefore, the communities’ action guide retains the voice and future image of the communities presented by the communities members participating in the public engagement process.

          The final format of the Communities Action Guide will be web-based. The PDF version of the Draft Communities Action Guide is provided as a courtesy for simplifying public review, but may not be available once the online version of the plan is finalized.

        • How to Use This Communities Action Guide

          Purpose and Approach

          Overall, the Communities Action Guides are a framework for communities to create the future character and independent identity, as identified in the workshops with communities values and aspirations, through completion of a communities action plan. As stated at the communities workshops, the new Communities Action Guides replace any existing 2007/2013 Community Plans, with a greater focus on community self-reliance, grass-roots action, and implementation. Goals, policies, land use, and infrastructure decisions are addressed in the Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan. The County Development Code will still regulate zoning and land development.

          The Communities Action Guide is strategic in nature and provides clear Focus Statements and Action Statements identified by the communities that led to creation of an Action Plan that can be implemented at the grass-roots level within each of the communities. Some actions may require assistance by a County department, but the communities will take the lead in moving the action forward, identifying funding or scheduling meetings or requesting information from specific County departments.

          A detailed implementation plan and training module will be set up by the County to guide communities in identifying Champions, setting up Action Teams, contacting County departments and answering questions. In addition, the County’s role will be clarified. This information will be included on the website for easy reference by communities.

          Plan Organization

          The Communities Action Guide is organized into three main sections, the communities’ Values, communities’ Aspirations, and Action Plans.

          VALUES – Those shared assets, principles, standards, mores and in the judgement of the communities, what is important to the lives of its residents and businesses. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

          Communities Values are listed under the Our Community tab.

          ASPIRATIONS– A written narrative illustrating the communities’ desired look and function once the Communities Action Guide is fully implemented. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. It is written as if the communities’ desired changes have already occurred. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

          Communities Aspirations are listed under the Our Aspirations tab.

          ACTION PLANS– The action plans consist of:

          • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Communities’ aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
          • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
          • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

          The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the guide are not prioritized. It is up to the communities to select the three to five priority Action Statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related Action Plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement. The Champions and Action Teams should review the Action Statement, Benchmark, and Action Steps. They may even hold a public meeting to get additional input before starting implementation of a specific Action Statement. Changes may be made as new input is received.

          Action Plans are listed under the Our Action Plans tab.

          The Action Guide as a Living Document

          The Communities Action Guides and the Countywide Plan are designed to be web-based and therefore will be easily updated. The Communities Action Guide is intended to be championed and implemented by the Communities. The Focus Statements and Action Statement within the guide were created through public engagement workshops by community participants.

          The guide is meant as a way to organize activities and provide overall direction to move the Communitiesorward. The plan should never be considered to be written in stone, but should be malleable as the needs of the Communities continue to change. Focus Statements and Action Statements should be changed and amended as Action Statements are completed or new priorities take their place.

          The Communities should consider reviewing its guide annually to celebrate what was accomplished and make changes to the guide, as necessary, to ensure it is a relevant work plan. Communities should report back to the County as they complete actions to ensure their online guide is updated with success stories included on their website and to ensure their Action Plans are updated reflecting completed actions. As communities complete their Action Plans, the County will determine when to revisit the communities to expand or modify their Action Plans.

        • Relationship to the Countywide Vision and Countywide Plan

          Relationship to Countywide Vision

          The Community Action Guide’s values and goals are specific to each community. However, they are consistent with, build on, and contribute to the Countywide Vision.

          Relationship to Countywide Plan

          In 2010, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors set out to establish a vision for the future of the county as a whole, and subsequently adopted a Countywide Vision in 2011 after two years of input from the communities and the county’s 24 cities and towns. Following the adoption of the Countywide Vision, which calls for the creation of a “complete county”, the Board adopted the County paradigm and job statements in 2012.

          In 2015, the County of San Bernardino launched an effort to go further than any county or city has ever gone with a general plan by creating a web-based comprehensive “complete county” plan. General plans are almost always strictly rule books for guiding development and growth. The County’s General Plan, last updated in 2007, will go well beyond a traditional general plan to become a comprehensive Countywide Plan that complements and informs the Countywide Vision by taking into account all services—not just land-use planning—provided by County Government, and the unique values and priorities of each unincorporated community.

          The Countywide Plan serves as a guide for County decision-making, financial planning, and communications. Its web-based format provides a wealth of easily accessible data on how the County operates, and allow independent research using County data and information.

          The Countywide Plan includes:

          • A County Policy Plan, which serves in part as the County’s General Plan for the unincorporated areas and also provides guidance for regional county services. The Policy Plan establishes goals and policies for the entire county as well as specific sub regions and communities.
          • A County Business Plan, which contains governance policies and operational metrics that outline the County’s approach to providing municipal and regional services.
          • A Regional Issues Forum, which is an online resource for sharing information and resources related to issues confronting the entire county.
          • A Community Planning Continuum of 35 Community Action Guides, which articulates what is important to each Community; sets out an Action Plan based on community input, and for the most part, would be implemented by the community; and provides a Community Profile. Links will also be provided for maps, goals, and policies in the Countywide Plan.

        • Where Did the Goals, Policies, and Land Use Map for My Community’s Plan Go?

          The existing Community Plan content was used in the development of the Communities Action Guide and Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan. Goals and policies from the existing community plan, as well as proposed land use changes discussed during the communities workshops, were considered for inclusion in the County Policy Plan and Land Use Map, components of the Countywide Plan. The Land Use Map will be adopted as part of the County Policy Plan. The content of the Communities Action Guide focuses on those actions identified by the communities that the community members are willing to take to make desired changes to their communities. The County Policy Plan and the Community Action Guides will be web-based, with adoption of the Countywide Plan in 2019.

          To enable residents to better understand how the County addressed the existing Community Plan goals and policies in the County Policy Plan and elsewhere, the County created a Policy Matrix that lists each goal and policy from the current Community Plan and where it will be addressed in the future:

          • Policy Plan: the location for updated goals and policies that apply to unincorporated areas
          • Implementation Plan: the location for actions to be undertaken by the County to implement the Countywide Plan (to be released in 2019)
          • Community Action Guide: the location for actions to be undertaken by community members, in coordination with the County
          • Development Code: detailed standards or regulations that are already addressed in the Development Code or can be considered in the upcoming Development Code update
          • Other: those issues, goals, policies, or actions that have already been accomplished, are outdated, or are no longer a community priority

          Click here to download a Policy Matrix for your community’s 2007 Community Plan

          Click here to visit the webpage for the County Policy Plan

        • What is the Community Development Toolkit?

          The County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department is creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Communities Action Guide.





      • Our Community

          Lake Gregory Education Center

        • Who We Are

          The Crest Forest communities consist of several small mountaintop communities where residents enjoy a slower pace of living and neighbors work together to foster a safe environment for families. The Crest Forest communities maintain a strong connection to the natural environment and value its preservation and enhancement, as well as the tourism and recreation opportunities it provides. Community members look to build upon their neighborly communities and promote them as a desirable place to raise a family by attracting full-time families with high quality educational opportunities at all levels, a strong business environment, enhanced natural environment with recreational facilities and activities, and improved public safety.

          Strengths and Opportunities

          Community workshops were conducted in each community as part of the engagement process. In addition, input was gathered through the Countywide Plan website. As part of the process, participants defined the strengths of and opportunities for their community. The word cloud below was created using the input provided during the Strengths, Opportunities, Values and Aspirations exercises and served as part of the base information utilized to develop the Focus and Action Statements of the Community Action Guide. The word cloud quickly informed participants of key issues and focus areas that could be addressed in the guide. The more a word or phrase was articulated, the larger the word appears in the cloud. The full results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats gathered as a part of the engagement process is found in the Community Profile.

          Crest Forest Word Cloud

        • Community Values

          The Values are those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important in the lives of its residents and businesses. A community’s values are an important consideration in shaping its aspirations, focus and actions.

           

          Natural Environment

          Crest Forest communities’ residents value their strong connection to the surrounding natural environment and take great pride in all of its elements, including the beauty and tranquility of the mountains, the abundance of plant and wildlife habitats, starry night skies, and fresh air.


          Outdoor Recreational Opportunities

          Crest Forest communities’ residents value outdoor recreation activities, including Lake Gregory; skiing, sledding, and snow play; walking/hiking trails, and access to off-highway vehicle areas that draw in visitors and are a source of pride and entertainment for residents.


          Independence and Small Town Community

          Crest Forest communities’ residents value their strong independence and the friendliness and involvement of residents, where neighbors know and help each other and work together to foster a safe environment for families.


          Local Living and Tourism

          Crest Forest communities’ residents value tourism and the financial benefits it brings to the communities. They cherish the small-town mountain character of their communities and work together to protect and enhance the natural resources of the area while supporting tourism.

        • Community Profile

          The community profile is a summary of the social, cultural, economic, and historic dimensions of Crest Forest. It presents data collected through secondary sources to inform future actions. The profile, together with future studies and information gathered from residents highlights essential facets and “tell the story” of the Crest Forest Communities.

          2019 Draft Communities Profile (No changes made)

          2018 Revised Draft Communities Profile

          2017 Public Review Draft Communities Profile




      • Our Aspirations

        Crest Forest Workshop #3

        The Aspirations Statement is a written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Focus Statements and Action Statements are fully implemented. This is a long term view of 10 to 20 years. The Aspirations Statement serves as a foundation for developing Community Focus Statements and Action Statements.


        • 1. Preserved Natural Environment and Quality of Life

          The quality of mountain life and the protection of the natural environment are critical to the Crest Forest communities. Residents and businesses continue to ensure that the natural environment is protected and enhanced and free of unsightly trash and litter. Community members actively participate in planning and development activities within the communities through participation in public meetings and support of development standards that maintain the mountain character and protect the natural environment.


        • 2. Strong Neighborly Communities That Attract Families

          Residents build on their strong neighborly communities by attracting full-time families with high quality education opportunities at all levels, quality employment opportunities, a strong business environment, and improved safety. Community groups, businesses, and local schools work together to improve and promote the Crest Forest communities as a desirable place to raise a family.


        • 3. Enhanced Recreational Facilities and Activities

          Our community works to expand affordable and accessible recreational facilities and activities for a variety of ages and abilities. Residents coordinate with the County and the Rim of the World Recreation and Park District to provide facilities and programming that are affordable and meet the needs of current and future residents. The communities also continue to explore opportunities for the joint use of facilities and taken advantage of unused spaces when possible.


        • 4. Improved Access and Transportation Options

          The communities work with the County of San Bernardino to develop alternative and improved access to and through the Crest Forest communities. Opportunities to reduce vehicular traffic in the area are explored, including a local shuttle/trolley system during peak visitor periods, a regional transportation system, and walking/hiking/cycling paths that connect community nodes. Efforts to construct these alternative means of transportation are implemented or determined to not be possible within the communities at this time.


        • 5. High Quality Education

          Residents seek out opportunities to improve primary and secondary education in the mountain communities in a widely supported effort to enhance the local school system. The communities work directly with local schools to foster a positive and collaborative relationship that prioritizes the needs of youth.


        • 6. Strong Business Environment

          Residents continue to support home-grown businesses and desire high quality employment opportunities within the mountain communities. The local Chamber of Commerce provides marketing activities that draw businesses and tourists to the area.




      • Our Action Plans

        Action Plans

        2019 Revised Draft Action Plans

        2018 Revised Draft Action Plans

        2017 Public Review Draft Action Plans

        The Action Plans consist of:

              • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
              • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
              • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

        Focus Statements and Action Statements

        Each Focus Statement is listed below. The Action Statements display under the corresponding Focus Statement. Expanded discussions of each Action Statement are included in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

        The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

        Focus Statements


        • A. Provide a unified downtown area that is active and thriving

          Action Statements

          A1. Provide additional public amenities such as restrooms, seating areas, open space areas, and lighted pedestrian paths, walkways, and crosswalks in the Lake Drive area.

          A2. Install improved lighting in public spaces to promote activity and deter crime.

          A3. Encourage property owners to maintain and improve their properties (e.g. new paint, façade improvements, trash/debris clean-up).

          A4. Construct sidewalks and additional or improved parking, to enhance safety and efficiency in business areas.

          A5. Coordinate and implement a clean-up program for the downtown/business district areas. Collaborate with the County to establish a consistent/compatible design theme for the downtown/business district areas.

          A6. Collaborate with the County to establish a consistent/compatible design theme for the downtown/business district areas.


        • B. Develop and improve parks and recreational facilities and services for all ages

          Action Statements

          B1. Identify recreation needs, including facilities and programs, by working with residents from all age groups and abilities.

          B2. Identify opportunities for joint-use of underused and vacant facilities to serve recreation needs.

          B3. Identify opportunities to incorporate bike trails within the communities.

          B4. Host family-friendly activities/events such as movie nights at Lake Gregory.

          B5: Identify centralized open space/community gathering areas for programming of community events.

          B6. Encourage locally-sponsored events by advocating with the County for a simplified and streamlined permit process.


        • C. Create affordable outdoor recreation activities that capitalize on the natural environment, attract visitors, and provide entertainment for residents while also reducing the associated impacts to the communities

          Action Statements

          C1. Provide dumpsters and signage that encourages proper disposal of trash in high-traffic visitor areas.

          C2. Investigate opportunities to establish designated sledding areas with parking to avoid visitors establishing undesignated sledding and parking areas.

          C3. Provide signage, maps, and other informational materials that identify trails and amenities.

          C4. Develop programs and marketing materials that educate visitors on the natural environment and importance of its protection in order to foster responsible tourist behavior.

          C5. Encourage the establishment of ecotourism businesses.

          C6. Establish an annual Arts and Music Festival while supporting arts and music programs.


        • D. Provide a thriving and vibrant local small business environment

          Action Statements

          D1. Attract and retain permanent residents by developing and implementing a marketing campaign to highlight the values of mountain living for young families focusing on education, family values, community, natural environment, and activities.

          D2. Establish a marketing plan that focuses on the natural environment and existing tourist attractions and amenities, such as Lake Gregory Regional Park.

          D3. Establish a marketing plan with incentives to attract new businesses to the area.

          D4. Establish a marketing plan with incentives to encourage home-based businesses.

          D5. Establish regional collaborative relationships mountain-wide between employers and high schools and local public or local non-profit junior colleges such as San Bernardino Valley College and Crafton Hills College to offer low-cost credentialing and certification programs to increase educational opportunities for employees to gain job skills.

          D6. Initiate strategies to improve communications with business and develop a Business Retention & Expansion (BR&E) program.

          D7. Establish a business appreciation program, including events, webinars, and awards.

          D8. Identify and develop entrepreneurial talent in coordination with existing programs at California State University San Bernardino (CSUSB) through a coaching program and entrepreneur training program, known as “Economic Gardening”.

          D9. Equip the local Chamber of Commerce to be a one stop shop for help with regulatory permits, financing sources, and serve as ombudsperson with local agencies.


        • E. Improve public safety

          Action Statements

          E1. Establish a neighborhood watch program that can be implemented throughout the communities.

          E2. Encourage community members to participate in the Citizens Patrol Program coordinated through the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department.

          E3. Partner with the San Bernardino County Sheriff Department, United States Forest Service, San Bernardino County Fire, local safety experts, and insurance companies to educate property owners on securing homes and businesses.

          E4. Design and promote materials to educate about identifying and reporting illegal dumping activities.

          E5. Identify infrastructure improvements that would increase and improve access within and between the communities.


        • F. Provide quality education opportunities at all levels

          Action Statements

          F1. Establish mountain-wide partnerships for joint use of existing Public School infrastructure and junior colleges to provide expanded educational opportunities for residents.

          F2. Investigate the declining enrollment and quality of public schools for the mountain communities through community organizing and involvement that fosters dialogue and collaboration with the local schools.


        Action Plan Matrices

        The Action Plan Matrix for each Action Statement listed above can be found in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

        How to Implement the Action Plans

        The Action Plans provide a general organization of the action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement. The Community may want to meet to identify the top three to five priority Action Statements to work on first. Some of these may be those actions that the community believes could be completed quickly and easily. Completion of one Action Statement will provide the community and local groups with the motivation to move forward with another Action Statement.

        Once an Action Statement is selected for implementation, the community identifies a Champion for that Action Statement to initiate activities, identify those responsible for carrying out action steps, identify and secure resources that will be required, and develop a timeline. The champion is not responsible for completing the action, but serves to facilitate and guide the Action Team. While suggested action steps are included in the guide, each community should develop more specific assignments based upon available community resources such as volunteers (e.g., individuals, businesses, property owners, etc.), community groups (e.g., chamber of commerce, non-profits, etc.) and organizations (e.g., scouts, community service districts, churches, schools, etc.). This step of planning for implementation is an important first step necessary to help ensure successful implementation.

        Potential resources are identified for each Action Statement. These may be guides on implementation, case studies of how other communities have implemented similar projects, sources of potential external funding, and organizations and agencies that can provide guidance and advice.

        A more detailed Implementation Plan will also be developed. The Implementation Plan will include information about how to inform the County about changes to your Community Action Guide. In addition, the County will want to know when work starts on an Action Statement and when each Action Statement is completed. It is important for the community to celebrate as actions are fulfilled.

        The Action Plans are Not Set in Stone

        The Action Plans are to be used to guide community actions and are not “set in stone”. Champions and Action Leaders are suggestions, but your community has a better idea of the best Champion for individual actions. The Action process is a general set of tasks that can be modified by the Champion, Action Leaders and/or Action Teams to best fit your community. The community should feel free to make changes and find alternatives for completing actions.

        The Community Development Toolkit

        San Bernardino County Land Use Services is in the process of creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Communities’ Action Guide.



      • Material in this section will be added as it is completed with community input. Click on each item for more information and a link to download the material.

        Draft Oak Glen Community Action Guide

        • Introduction
        • Our Community
        • Our Aspirations
        • Our Action Plans
        • Maps & Links

        • Introduction

          Oak Glen

          In 2016, the community embarked on a new community planning process. Three public workshops, open to any community resident, or business, or property owner, addressed strengths and weaknesses of the community, the community’s values, and what the community aspires to be in the future. Participants brainstormed areas of focus and actions to help the community move forward to achieve its aspirations.

          In October 2017, the initial results were released for public review as a draft community plan. In response to public comments, the plans were renamed Community Action Guides. This name change along with a first set of revisions that resulted from public review were incorporated into the Draft Community Action Guide, released for public review in August 2018. The 2020 Draft Community Action Guide is the most recent version that considers additional public input, as well as informational and grammatical improvements.

          The results are presented as the Draft Community Action Guide through this webpage, including the additional tabs above.

          The final format of the Community Action Guide will be web-based. The PDF version of the Draft Community Action Guide (linked below) is provided as a courtesy for simplifying public review, but may not be available once the online version of the plan is finalized.

          2020 Revised Draft Community Action Guide

          2019 Revised Draft Community Action Guide

          2018 Revised Draft Community Action Guide

          2017 Public Review Draft

          2007 Community Plan Policy Matrix

          This community has an existing Community Plan, adopted in 2007, and intended to guide the future use, character, and independent identity of the community. As part of Countywide Plan, the County is consolidating goals and policies from both the overall 2007 General Plan and the 2007/2013 Community Plans into a single source of policy direction called the County Policy Plan. Consolidating policy into one document alleviates consistency issues and avoids redundancy between the General Plan and Community Plans. As a result, the policy direction is easier to navigate, understand, and implement.

          To enable residents to better understand how the County addressed the existing Community Plan goals and policies in the County Policy Plan and elsewhere, the County created a Policy Matrix that lists each goal and policy from the current Community Plan and where it will be addressed in the future. This matrix was originally released in August 2018, alongside the 2018 Draft Policy Plan and 2018 Revised Draft Community Action Guides. The May 2019 Policy Matrix has been updated to reflect changes released with the 2019 Draft Policy Plan and the 2019 Revised Draft Community Action Guide.

          Policy Matrix for your community’s 2007 Community Plan

          This document was revised after the September 2018 regional meetings based on community input. To see changes to the document since 2018, view the tracked changes version below, in which new text is underlined while deleted text is struck out.

          2019 Policy Matrix showing tracked changes since 2018


          • The Draft 2019 Community Action Guide for Public Review

            You may use the feedback form on this page to submit your comments online — look to the left or scroll down to the bottom depending on your device.

            In addition, you may e-mail comments to CommunityPlans@lus.sbcounty.gov or submit written comments by mail to:

            County of San Bernardino
            Land Use Services Department
            385 N. Arrowhead Ave., 1st Floor
            San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

            This Draft Community Action Guide was created by the community members who attended workshops, provided comments online or sent in written comments. It is written in the words of those participating in the public engagement process. Therefore, the community’s action guide retains the voice and future image of the community presented by the community members participating in the public engagement process.

            The final format of the Community Action Guide will be web-based. The PDF version of the Draft Community Action Guide is provided as a courtesy for simplifying public review, but may not be available once the online version of the plan is finalized.

          • How to Use This Community Action Guide

            Purpose and Approach

            Overall, the Community Action Guides are a framework for communities to create the future character and independent identity, as identified in the workshops with community values and aspirations, through completion of a community action plan. As stated at the community workshops, the new Community Action Guides replace any existing 2007/2013 Community Plans, with a greater focus on community self-reliance, grass-roots action, and implementation. Goals, policies, land use, and infrastructure decisions are addressed in the Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan. The County Development Code will still regulate zoning and land development.

            The Community Action Guide is strategic in nature and provides clear Focus Statements and Action Statements identified by the community that led to creation of an Action Plan that can be implemented at the grass-roots level within each community. Some actions may require assistance by a County department, but the community will take the lead in moving the action forward, identifying funding or scheduling meetings or requesting information from specific County departments.

            A detailed implementation plan and training module will be set up by the County to guide communities in identifying Champions, setting up Action Teams, contacting County departments and answering questions. In addition, the County’s role will be clarified. This information will be included on the website for easy reference by communities.

            Plan Organization

            The Community Action Guide is organized into three main sections, the community’s Values, community’s Aspirations, and Action Plans.

            VALUES – Those shared assets, principles, standards, mores and in the judgement of the community, what is important to the lives of its residents and businesses. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

            Community Values are listed under the Our Community tab.

            ASPIRATIONS– A written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Action Guide is fully implemented. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. It is written as if the community’s desired changes have already occurred. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

            Community Aspirations are listed under the Our Aspirations tab.

            ACTION PLANS– The action plans consist of:

            • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
            • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
            • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

            The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the guide are not prioritized. It is up to the community to select the three to five priority Action Statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related Action Plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement. The Champions and Action Teams should review the Action Statement, Benchmark, and Action Steps. They may even hold a public meeting to get additional input before starting implementation of a specific Action Statement. Changes may be made as new input is received.

            Action Plans are listed under the Our Action Plans tab.

            The Action Guide as a Living Document

            The Community Action Guides and the Countywide Plan are designed to be web-based and therefore will be easily updated. The Community Action Guide is intended to be championed and implemented by the Community. The Focus Statements and Action Statement within the guide were created through public engagement workshops by community participants.

            The guide is meant as a way to organize activities and provide overall direction to move the Community forward. The plan should never be considered to be written in stone, but should be malleable as the needs of the Community continue to change. Focus Statements and Action Statements should be changed and amended as Action Statements are completed or new priorities take their place.

            The Community should consider reviewing its guide annually to celebrate what was accomplished and make changes to the guide, as necessary, to ensure it is a relevant work plan. Communities should report back to the County as they complete actions to ensure their online guide is updated with success stories included on their website and to ensure their Action Plans are updated reflecting completed actions. As communities complete their Action Plans, the County will determine when to revisit the community to expand or modify their Action Plans.

          • Relationship to the Countywide Vision and Countywide Plan

            Relationship to Countywide Vision

            The Community Action Guide’s values and goals are specific to each community. However, they are consistent with, build on, and contribute to the Countywide Vision.

            Relationship to Countywide Plan

            In 2010, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors set out to establish a vision for the future of the county as a whole, and subsequently adopted a Countywide Vision in 2011 after two years of input from the community and the county’s 24 cities and towns. Following the adoption of the Countywide Vision, which calls for the creation of a “complete county”, the Board adopted the County paradigm and job statements in 2012.

            In 2015, the County of San Bernardino launched an effort to go further than any county or city has ever gone with a general plan by creating a web-based comprehensive “complete county” plan. General plans are almost always strictly rule books for guiding development and growth. The County’s General Plan, last updated in 2007, will go well beyond a traditional general plan to become a comprehensive Countywide Plan that complements and informs the Countywide Vision by taking into account all services—not just land-use planning—provided by County Government, and the unique values and priorities of each unincorporated community.

            The Countywide Plan serves as a guide for County decision-making, financial planning, and communications. Its web-based format provides a wealth of easily accessible data on how the County operates, and allow independent research using County data and information.

            The Countywide Plan includes:

            • A County Policy Plan, which serves in part as the County’s General Plan for the unincorporated areas and also provides guidance for regional county services. The Policy Plan establishes goals and policies for the entire county as well as specific sub regions and communities.
            • A County Business Plan, which contains governance policies and operational metrics that outline the County’s approach to providing municipal and regional services.
            • A Regional Issues Forum, which is an online resource for sharing information and resources related to issues confronting the entire county.
            • A Community Planning Continuum of 35 Community Action Guides, which articulates what is important to each Community; sets out an Action Plan based on community input, and for the most part, would be implemented by the community; and provides a Community Profile. Links will also be provided for maps, goals, and policies in the Countywide Plan.

          • Where Did the Goals, Policies, and Land Use Map for My Community’s Plan Go?

            The existing Community Plan content was used in the development of the Community Action Guide and Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan. Goals and policies from the existing community plan, as well as proposed land use changes discussed during the community workshops, were considered for inclusion in the County Policy Plan and Land Use Map, components of the Countywide Plan. The Land Use Map will be adopted as part of the County Policy Plan. The content of the Community Action Guide focuses on those actions identified by the community that the community is willing to take to make desired changes to their community. The County Policy Plan and the Community Action Guides will be web-based, with adoption of the Countywide Plan in 2019.

            To enable residents to better understand how the County addressed the existing Community Plan goals and policies in the County Policy Plan and elsewhere, the County created a Policy Matrix that lists each goal and policy from the current Community Plan and where it will be addressed in the future:

            • Policy Plan: the location for updated goals and policies that apply to unincorporated areas
            • Implementation Plan: the location for actions to be undertaken by the County to implement the Countywide Plan (to be released in 2019)
            • Community Action Guide: the location for actions to be undertaken by community members, in coordination with the County
            • Development Code: detailed standards or regulations that are already addressed in the Development Code or can be considered in the upcoming Development Code update
            • Other: those issues, goals, policies, or actions that have already been accomplished, are outdated, or are no longer a community priority

            Click here to download a Policy Matrix for your community’s 2007 Community Plan

            Click here to visit the webpage for the County Policy Plan

          • What is the Community Development Toolkit?

            The County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department is creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.





        • Our Community


            Oak Glen

          • Who We Are

            Oak Glen is a historic agricultural community nestled in the San Bernardino Mountains. With families who have lived in Oak Glen for generations, the community is very family oriented and focused on preserving their unique way of life, including apple farming and related agritourism. Oak Glen values the natural resources, agricultural traditions, and close-knit family values that make the community a special place. Oak Glen strives to promote responsible use and development of the land in the community by sharing their agricultural practices and traditions with visitors throughout the region. Concerned with keeping the community rural, residents and businesses seek to balance their way of life with the pressures of agritourism and the preservation of a rural mountain lifestyle.

            Strengths and Opportunities

            Community workshops were conducted in each community as part of the engagement process. In addition, input was gathered through the Countywide Plan website. As part of the process, participants defined the strengths of and opportunities for their community. The word cloud below was created using the input provided during the Strengths, Opportunities, Values and Aspirations exercises and served as part of the base information utilized to develop the Focus and Action Statements of the Community Action Guide. The word cloud quickly informed participants of key issues and focus areas that could be addressed in the guide. The more a word or phrase was articulated, the larger the word appears in the cloud. The full results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats gathered as a part of the engagement process is found in the Community Profile.

            Oak Glen Word Cloud

          • Community Values

            The Values are those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important in the lives of its residents and businesses. A community’s values are an important consideration in shaping its aspirations, focus and actions.

             

            Agricultural Roots

            Oak Glen residents value the agricultural history, culture, and traditions that help define the community.


            Rural Lifestyle

            Oak Glen residents value the community’s rural lifestyle and agricultural roots.


            Agritourism

            Oak Glen residents value the apple growing history and culture, and the benefits of the local agritourism industry.


            Community Spirit

            Oak Glen residents value a strong complementary sense of community, family, and neighborly attitude to help one another.


            Recreational Opportunities

            Oak Glen residents value the natural beauty, clean air, and recreational opportunities of the community’s mountain setting.


            Resiliency

            Oak Glen residents value community safety and resilience against natural hazards.


            Local Businesses

            Oak Glen residents value the locally owned business culture and the local businesses that help define the community.

          • Community Profile

            The community profile is a summary of the social, cultural, economic, and historic dimensions of Oak Glen. It presents data collected through secondary sources to inform future actions. The profile, together with future studies and information gathered from residents highlights essential facets and “tell the story” of the Oak Glen Community.

            2019 Revised Draft Community Profile

            2018 Revised Draft Community Profile

            2017 Public Review Draft Community Profile




        • Our Aspirations

          Oak Glen Workshop #1

          The Aspirations Statement is a written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Focus Statements and Action Statements are fully implemented. This is a long term view of 10 to 20 years. The Aspirations Statement serves as a foundation for developing Community Focus Statements and Action Statements.


          • 1. Tourism-Focused Growth

            Because of Oak Glen’s beautiful natural setting and unique position as one of the most well-known apple producing areas in California, agriculture-based tourism continues to expand with enhanced marketing. Local producers create educational programs to share their knowledge with visitors and schools in the area. The agricultural heritage and success of the local apple orchards fuel economic growth around the industry, with restaurants and small locally owned shops focused on tourism.


          • 2. Knowledge of Historic Roots

            Through fundraising and volunteer efforts by local community groups, residents expand historic resources throughout the community including on private farms, businesses and at the Historic Oak Glen Schoolhouse Museum. The exhibits ensure that each new generation learns about the history of Oak Glen and why the community looks and functions the way it does. A new program of community events, sponsored primarily by local businesses, is successful in creating a sense of pride in the community’s historical roots.


          • 3. Scenic and Historic Preservation

            Through the efforts of the community the scenic beauty of Oak Glen is enhanced by the addition of a historic corridor along Oak Glen Road focused on preserving notable historic landmarks and improved fencing and signage to reflect its pioneers era. In addition, community efforts direct the continued protection and additional planting of orchards and native trees and vegetation.




        • Our Action Plans

          Action Plans

          2019 Revised Draft Action Plans

          2018 Revised Draft Action Plans

          2017 Public Review Draft Action Plans

          The Action Plans consist of:

                • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

          Focus Statements and Action Statements

          Each Focus Statement is listed below. The Action Statements display under the corresponding Focus Statement. Expanded discussions of each Action Statement are included in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

          The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

          Focus Statements


          • A. Preserve and enhance the rural agricultural character and setting of Oak Glen

            Action Statements

            A1. Encourage County identification and designation of important agricultural resources and collaborate to preserve these resources as historic landmarks. Consider establishing an Oak Glen Historic District.

            A2. Encourage traditional design and landscaping standards to fit the community’s agricultural and historic Americana-style identity to fit in with existing historic buildings and incorporate into County building standards.

            A3. Encourage existing and future agricultural production to support and expand the concept of a living historic museum that educates visitors about historic agricultural practices used within the community.


          • B. Ensure safe and effective mobility options that accommodate the community’s needs throughout the year

            Action Statements

            B1. Advocate and collaborate with the County to identify public safety concerns and areas along Oak Glen Road that reduce vehicular and pedestrian issues for local residents and visitors.

            B2. Advocate for and seek funding to complete a safety plan or mobility plan for Oak Glen Road throughout the community and not just in the village area (e.g., additional travel/turn lanes, pedestrian and bicycle facilities, and adequate parking spaces to meet peak demand, etc.).

            B3. Advocate for and seek funding to construct traffic calming improvements that increase safety for pedestrians and visitors along Oak Glen Road with priority given to the busiest sections.


          • C. Preserve and enhance the unique environmental features of Oak Glen including native wildlife, vegetation, and scenic vistas, while enhancing open space and recreational opportunities and amenities

            Action Statements

            C1. Establish a community-based education program for landscaping and vegetation maintenance and management.

            C2. Identify scenic vistas in the community that should be protected and enhanced, and develop educational kiosks to share key
            information about these resources with tourists to the area.

            C3. Enhance existing and permit new recreational facilities such as lodging, organized camps and campgrounds to support continual use year round.


          • D. Promote economic development that compliments the rural agricultural character and natural setting of the Oak Glen community

            Action Statements

            D1. Enhance hospitality uses that allow overnight accommodations by promoting short-term rental opportunities and educating
            B&B and short-term rental owners on county regulations.

            D2. Advocate and collaborate with the County to develop community based standards for wedding venue priority areas and requirements to alleviate nuisance issues.


          Action Plan Matrices

          The Action Plan Matrix for each Action Statement listed above can be found in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

          How to Implement the Action Plans

          The Action Plans provide a general organization of the action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement. The Community may want to meet to identify the top three to five priority Action Statements to work on first. Some of these may be those actions that the community believes could be completed quickly and easily. Completion of one Action Statement will provide the community and local groups with the motivation to move forward with another Action Statement.

          Once an Action Statement is selected for implementation, the community identifies a Champion for that Action Statement to initiate activities, identify those responsible for carrying out action steps, identify and secure resources that will be required, and develop a timeline. The champion is not responsible for completing the action, but serves to facilitate and guide the Action Team. While suggested action steps are included in the guide, each community should develop more specific assignments based upon available community resources such as volunteers (e.g., individuals, businesses, property owners, etc.), community groups (e.g., chamber of commerce, non-profits, etc.) and organizations (e.g., scouts, community service districts, churches, schools, etc.). This step of planning for implementation is an important first step necessary to help ensure successful implementation.

          Potential resources are identified for each Action Statement. These may be guides on implementation, case studies of how other communities have implemented similar projects, sources of potential external funding, and organizations and agencies that can provide guidance and advice.

          A more detailed Implementation Plan will also be developed. The Implementation Plan will include information about how to inform the County about changes to your Community Action Guide. In addition, the County will want to know when work starts on an Action Statement and when each Action Statement is completed. It is important for the community to celebrate as actions are fulfilled.

          The Action Plans are Not Set in Stone

          The Action Plans are to be used to guide community actions and are not “set in stone”. Champions and Action Leaders are suggestions, but your community has a better idea of the best Champion for individual actions. The Action process is a general set of tasks that can be modified by the Champion, Action Leaders and/or Action Teams to best fit your community. The community should feel free to make changes and find alternatives for completing actions.

          The Community Development Toolkit

          San Bernardino County Land Use Services is in the process of creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Community’s plan.



        • Material in this section will be added as it is completed with community input. Click on each item for more information and a link to download the material.

          Draft Bear Valley Communities Action Guide

          • Introduction
          • Our Community
          • Our Aspirations
          • Our Action Plans
          • Maps & Links

          • Introduction

            Big Bear Discovery Center

            In 2016, the communities embarked on a new community planning process. Three public workshops, open to any community resident, or business, or property owner, addressed strengths and weaknesses of the communities, the communities’ values, and what the communities aspire to be in the future. Participants brainstormed areas of focus and actions to help the communities move forward to achieve their aspirations.

            In October 2017, the initial results were released for public review as a draft community plan. In response to public comments, the plans were renamed Community Action Guides. This name change along with a first set of revisions that resulted from public review were incorporated into the Draft Community Action Guide, released for public review in August 2018. The 2019 Draft Community Action Guide reflects changes made in response to public comments on the 2018 Draft.

            The results are presented as the Draft Communities Action Guide through this webpage, including the additional tabs above.

            The final format of the Communities Action Guide will be web-based. The PDF version of the Draft Communities Action Guide (linked below) is provided as a courtesy for simplifying public review, but may not be available once the online version of the plan is finalized.

            2019 Revised Draft Communities Action Guide

            2018 Revised Draft Communities Action Guide

            2017 Public Review Draft

            2007 Community Plan Policy Matrix

            This community has an existing Community Plan, adopted in 2007, and intended to guide the future use, character, and independent identity of the community. As part of Countywide Plan, the County is consolidating goals and policies from both the overall 2007 General Plan and the 2007/2013 Community Plans into a single source of policy direction called the County Policy Plan. Consolidating policy into one document alleviates consistency issues and avoids redundancy between the General Plan and Community Plans. As a result, the policy direction is easier to navigate, understand, and implement.

            To enable residents to better understand how the County addressed the existing Community Plan goals and policies in the County Policy Plan and elsewhere, the County created a Policy Matrix that lists each goal and policy from the current Community Plan and where it will be addressed in the future. This matrix was originally released in August 2018, alongside the 2018 Draft Policy Plan and 2018 Revised Draft Community Action Guides. The May 2019 Policy Matrix has been updated to reflect changes released with the 2019 Draft Policy Plan and the 2019 Revised Draft Community Action Guide.

            Policy Matrix for your community’s 2007 Community Plan

            This document was revised after the September 2018 regional meetings based on community input. To see changes to the document since 2018, view the tracked changes version below, in which new text is underlined while deleted text is struck out.

            2019 Policy Matrix showing tracked changes since 2018


            • The Draft 2019 Communities Action Guide for Public Review

              You may use the feedback form on this page to submit your comments online — look to the left or scroll down to the bottom depending on your device.

              In addition, you may e-mail comments to CommunityPlans@lus.sbcounty.gov or submit written comments by mail to:

              County of San Bernardino
              Land Use Services Department
              385 N. Arrowhead Ave., 1st Floor
              San Bernardino, CA 92415-0187

              This Draft Communities Action Guide was created by the communities members who attended workshops, provided comments online or sent in written comments. It is written in the words of those participating in the public engagement process. Therefore, the communities’ action guide retains the voice and future image of the communities presented by the communities members participating in the public engagement process.

              The final format of the Communities Action Guide will be web-based. The PDF version of the Draft Communities Action Guide is provided as a courtesy for simplifying public review, but may not be available once the online version of the plan is finalized.

            • How to Use This Communities Action Guide

              Purpose and Approach

              Overall, the Communities Action Guides are a framework for communities to create the future character and independent identity, as identified in the workshops with communities values and aspirations, through completion of a communities action plan. As stated at the communities workshops, the new Communities Action Guides replace any existing 2007/2013 Community Plans, with a greater focus on community self-reliance, grass-roots action, and implementation. Goals, policies, land use, and infrastructure decisions are addressed in the Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan. The County Development Code will still regulate zoning and land development.

              The Communities Action Guide is strategic in nature and provides clear Focus Statements and Action Statements identified by the communities that led to creation of an Action Plan that can be implemented at the grass-roots level within each of the communities. Some actions may require assistance by a County department, but the communities will take the lead in moving the action forward, identifying funding or scheduling meetings or requesting information from specific County departments.

              A detailed implementation plan and training module will be set up by the County to guide communities in identifying Champions, setting up Action Teams, contacting County departments and answering questions. In addition, the County’s role will be clarified. This information will be included on the website for easy reference by communities.

              Plan Organization

              The Communities Action Guide is organized into three main sections, the communities’ Values, communities’ Aspirations, and Action Plans.

              VALUES – Those shared assets, principles, standards, mores and in the judgement of the communities, what is important to the lives of its residents and businesses. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

              Communities Values are listed under the Our Community tab.

              ASPIRATIONS– A written narrative illustrating the communities’ desired look and function once the Communities Action Guide is fully implemented. This is a long-term view of 10 to 20 years. It is written as if the communities’ desired changes have already occurred. (Identified in Workshop #1 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #2)

              Communities Aspirations are listed under the Our Aspirations tab.

              ACTION PLANS– The action plans consist of:

              • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Communities’ aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
              • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
              • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

              The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the guide are not prioritized. It is up to the communities to select the three to five priority Action Statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related Action Plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement. The Champions and Action Teams should review the Action Statement, Benchmark, and Action Steps. They may even hold a public meeting to get additional input before starting implementation of a specific Action Statement. Changes may be made as new input is received.

              Action Plans are listed under the Our Action Plans tab.

              The Action Guide as a Living Document

              The Communities Action Guides and the Countywide Plan are designed to be web-based and therefore will be easily updated. The Communities Action Guide is intended to be championed and implemented by the Communities. The Focus Statements and Action Statement within the guide were created through public engagement workshops by community participants.

              The guide is meant as a way to organize activities and provide overall direction to move the Communitiesorward. The plan should never be considered to be written in stone, but should be malleable as the needs of the Communities continue to change. Focus Statements and Action Statements should be changed and amended as Action Statements are completed or new priorities take their place.

              The Communities should consider reviewing its guide annually to celebrate what was accomplished and make changes to the guide, as necessary, to ensure it is a relevant work plan. Communities should report back to the County as they complete actions to ensure their online guide is updated with success stories included on their website and to ensure their Action Plans are updated reflecting completed actions. As communities complete their Action Plans, the County will determine when to revisit the communities to expand or modify their Action Plans.

            • Relationship to the Countywide Vision and Countywide Plan

              Relationship to Countywide Vision

              The Community Action Guide’s values and goals are specific to each community. However, they are consistent with, build on, and contribute to the Countywide Vision.

              Relationship to Countywide Plan

              In 2010, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors set out to establish a vision for the future of the county as a whole, and subsequently adopted a Countywide Vision in 2011 after two years of input from the communities and the county’s 24 cities and towns. Following the adoption of the Countywide Vision, which calls for the creation of a “complete county”, the Board adopted the County paradigm and job statements in 2012.

              In 2015, the County of San Bernardino launched an effort to go further than any county or city has ever gone with a general plan by creating a web-based comprehensive “complete county” plan. General plans are almost always strictly rule books for guiding development and growth. The County’s General Plan, last updated in 2007, will go well beyond a traditional general plan to become a comprehensive Countywide Plan that complements and informs the Countywide Vision by taking into account all services—not just land-use planning—provided by County Government, and the unique values and priorities of each unincorporated community.

              The Countywide Plan serves as a guide for County decision-making, financial planning, and communications. Its web-based format provides a wealth of easily accessible data on how the County operates, and allow independent research using County data and information.

              The Countywide Plan includes:

              • A County Policy Plan, which serves in part as the County’s General Plan for the unincorporated areas and also provides guidance for regional county services. The Policy Plan establishes goals and policies for the entire county as well as specific sub regions and communities.
              • A County Business Plan, which contains governance policies and operational metrics that outline the County’s approach to providing municipal and regional services.
              • A Regional Issues Forum, which is an online resource for sharing information and resources related to issues confronting the entire county.
              • A Community Planning Continuum of 35 Community Action Guides, which articulates what is important to each Community; sets out an Action Plan based on community input, and for the most part, would be implemented by the community; and provides a Community Profile. Links will also be provided for maps, goals, and policies in the Countywide Plan.

            • Where Did the Goals, Policies, and Land Use Map for My Community’s Plan Go?

              The existing Community Plan content was used in the development of the Communities Action Guide and Policy Plan of the Countywide Plan. Goals and policies from the existing community plan, as well as proposed land use changes discussed during the communities workshops, were considered for inclusion in the County Policy Plan and Land Use Map, components of the Countywide Plan. The Land Use Map will be adopted as part of the County Policy Plan. The content of the Communities Action Guide focuses on those actions identified by the communities that the community members are willing to take to make desired changes to their communities. The County Policy Plan and the Community Action Guides will be web-based, with adoption of the Countywide Plan in 2019.

              To enable residents to better understand how the County addressed the existing Community Plan goals and policies in the County Policy Plan and elsewhere, the County created a Policy Matrix that lists each goal and policy from the current Community Plan and where it will be addressed in the future:

              • Policy Plan: the location for updated goals and policies that apply to unincorporated areas
              • Implementation Plan: the location for actions to be undertaken by the County to implement the Countywide Plan (to be released in 2019)
              • Community Action Guide: the location for actions to be undertaken by community members, in coordination with the County
              • Development Code: detailed standards or regulations that are already addressed in the Development Code or can be considered in the upcoming Development Code update
              • Other: those issues, goals, policies, or actions that have already been accomplished, are outdated, or are no longer a community priority

              Click here to download a Policy Matrix for your community’s 2007 Community Plan

              Click here to visit the webpage for the County Policy Plan

            • What is the Community Development Toolkit?

              The County of San Bernardino Land Use Services Department is creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Communities Action Guide.





          • Our Community

              Bear Valley Horses

            • Who We Are

              Bear Valley is made up of several small mountaintop communities where residents enjoy a slow, relaxed, unhurried pace of living in the tranquil setting of the San Bernardino National Forest. Bear Valley residents value the pristine beauty of its environment, supportive and neighborly bonds, and quiet, uncrowded neighborhoods built upon a well-established tourist economy. Stakeholders in Bear Valley strive to enhance the built environment, preserve natural resources, expand recreational opportunities, promote health, safety, and well-being, diversify and balance the economy, and expand their input on local matters.

              Strengths and Opportunities

              Community workshops were conducted in each community as part of the engagement process. In addition, input was gathered through the Countywide Plan website. As part of the process, participants defined the strengths of and opportunities for their community. The word cloud below was created using the input provided during the Strengths, Opportunities, Values and Aspirations exercises and served as part of the base information utilized to develop the Focus and Action Statements of the Community Action Guide. The word cloud quickly informed participants of key issues and focus areas that could be addressed in the guide. The more a word or phrase was articulated, the larger the word appears in the cloud. The full results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats gathered as a part of the engagement process is found in the Community Profile.

              Bear Valley Word Cloud

            • Community Values

              The Values are those shared assets, principles, standards, mores, and in the judgement of the community, what is important in the lives of its residents and businesses. A community’s values are an important consideration in shaping its aspirations, focus and actions.

               

              Small-Town Mountain Lifestyle

              Bear Valley residents value the beauty and tranquility of living in a small mountaintop environment where connections to community and nature are both strong and family-oriented.


              Slower Pace of Life

              Bear Valley residents value a slow pace of life in quiet, uncrowded crime-free neighborhoods, and respect for privacy.


              Quality Environment

              Bear Valley residents value clean air, dark skies, breathtaking views, natural habitats, and well-managed recreational resources.


              Supportive, Neighborly Bonds

              Bear Valley residents value supporting those in need and investing in community well-being by donating time and financial resources to local organizations.


              Established, Evolving Economy

              Bear Valley residents value recognition as a historic tourist destination with a well-established local economy offering a reasonable cost of living and opportunities for future economic growth.

            • Community Profile

              The community profile is a summary of the social, cultural, economic, and historic dimensions of Bear Valley. It presents data collected through secondary sources to inform future actions. The profile, together with future studies and information gathered from residents highlights essential facets and “tell the story” of the Bear Valley Communities.

              2019 Draft Communities Profile (No changes made)

              2018 Revised Draft Communities Profile

              2017 Public Review Draft Communities Profile




          • Our Aspirations

            Bear Valley Workshop #3

            The Aspirations Statement is a written narrative illustrating the community’s desired look and function once the Community Focus Statements and Action Statements are fully implemented. This is a long term view of 10 to 20 years. The Aspirations Statement serves as a foundation for developing Community Focus Statements and Action Statements.


            • 1. Improved Built Environment

              As a four-seasons resort destination, our communities attract business-supporting tourists throughout the year. Community members prioritized improvements to our built environment, including updated and well-maintained building facades, road maintenance, street improvements, and addressing accessibility concerns throughout the communities. These improvements have helped to enhance our commercial areas and decrease traffic and safety issues during peak tourism months.


            • 2. Clean, Safe, and Healthy Future

              Residents created a number of programs to address health and safety within the communities. Through regular community cleanup events, volunteers work to keep the pristine mountain area free of debris that takes away from the beauty of the environment and community. As a result of increased engagement with the San Bernardino County Human Services Department, increased services are available for people of all ages to promote mental and behavioral well-being. The San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department also established an annual class with community members that teaches residents how to safely and properly protect themselves and their neighbors through the implementation of a neighborhood watch program, which empowers residents to proactively address code violations, vacation home rental problems, and other potential nuisances.


            • 3. Balanced Economy

              The Bear Valley communities have a vibrant and balanced economy that includes tourism, health and wellness, environmental sciences, recreation, forestry, and activities and employment for people of all ages. Residents created community groups that work with the County of San Bernardino to market all aspects of the area, boost the local workforce in all industries, and bring investment into the area.


            • 4. Preservation of Natural Beauty

              The Bear Valley communities are unique in terms of their location in Southern California. Residents work to create educational materials for new community members and visitors, including a “welcome packet” that gives recommendations for how to live and play within a mountain environment without having a negative impact on the area.


            • 5. Recreational Opportunities

              The mountain environment offers plenty of opportunities for outdoor activities throughout the year. During the winter, residents and visitors enjoy alpine and cross-country skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, snow play, and biking. During the other three seasons, residents and visitors enjoy hiking, biking, camping, horseback riding, off-road touring, golfing, fishing, and watersports. Local interest groups collaborate with the County of San Bernardino and the US Forest Service to increase signage on trails and in outdoor spaces, which help to increase safety and enjoyment when using these areas.


            • 6. Expanded Input in Local Matters

              Our communities take pride in our ability to ensure personal freedom and integrity and local strength in decision-making. Through the creation of a local committee of community leaders who are responsible for working with the County of San Bernardino and other outside agencies the voice of the communities is heard in all matters impacting the area. Opportunities for making the communities’ voice heard is available through an increased number of community meetings and the preparation of formal recommendations for consideration by the County.




          • Our Action Plans

            Action Plans

            2019 Revised Draft Action Plans

            2018 Revised Draft Action Plans

            2017 Public Review Draft Action Plans

            The Action Plans consist of:

                  • Focus Statements, which provide general direction towards realizing the Community’s aspirations and help organize the plan. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                  • Action Statements, which are measurable statements providing critical information on the program, initiative or project to complete. (Identified in Workshop #2 and reviewed and finalized in Workshop #3)
                  • Action Plan Matrices, which provide general sets of action steps necessary to implement each action statement, identify those that would initiate and champion the action statement, provide a general timeline for implementation and identify resources for additional assistance. (Created to support and guide the Community’s identified Focus and Action Statements)

            Focus Statements and Action Statements

            Each Focus Statement is listed below. The Action Statements display under the corresponding Focus Statement. Expanded discussions of each Action Statement are included in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

            The Focus Statements and Action Statements of the plan are not written with a prioritization. It is up to the community to select the priority action statements that they wish to begin implementing. The related action plans for each Action Statement provide guidance on the actions and timeline that may be necessary to implement the Action Statement.

            Focus Statements


            • A. Improve the quality of our built environment to enhance community health, safety, neighborhood character, and the image of our business corridors

              Action Statements

              A1. Work with San Bernardino County Code Enforcement to develop educational materials to inform residents and property owners about County Codes, with a particular emphasis on inoperable vehicles, unpermitted construction, property maintenance, and other community concerns as they may change from time to time, and encourage local residents to report persistent problems to Code Enforcement.

              A2. Establish a community cleanup program in collaboration with community service organizations, local schools, and Big Bear Disposal to assist with large item trash pickup at least two times per year.

              A3. Construct public restrooms in two locations accessible to people arriving to the east end of the Big Bear Valley. If permanent restrooms are infeasible due to maintenance costs, install portable restrooms during peak visitor seasons, including three-day holiday weekends.

              A4. Adopt development standards and public infrastructure in commercial areas appropriate for a rural mountain community.

              A5. Establish and implement a façade and sign improvement program for existing and future businesses.

              A6. Construct improved bus stops with permanent and accessible benches and shelters in order to improve comfort and safety for bus riders, in partnership with Mountain Transit and local organizations such as the Community Services District, community service organizations, and local businesses.

              A7. Promote cleanup and repurposing of underutilized properties along Big Bear Boulevard, in Fawnskin, and in other key locations as identified by program partners.

              A8. Create and maintain a healthy forest and forest fuels management program.


            • B. Reduce traffic congestion by improving transit services, roadways and recreational networks for pedestrians and bicyclists, and transit riders

              Action Statements

              B1. Advocate for improved transportation options and reduced automobile traffic through Big Bear City on State Route 18 and State Route 38, which become congested with tourist traffic during peak holiday weekends and seasons. Solutions should be integrated with valley-wide and regional strategies and may include transit improvements, shuttle services, streetscape improvements (including pedestrian and bicycle facilities), marketing, or transportation access guides implemented in coordination with Mountain Transit, the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority, the City of Big Bear Lake, the California Department of Transportation, the Big Bear Valley Tourism Business Improvement District, and/or other relevant organizations.

              B2. Advocate for implementation of the Big Bear Valley Pedestrian, Bicycle, and Equestrian Master Plan in collaboration with partners such as the City of Big Bear Lake, County of San Bernardino Public Works, the Big Bear Valley Trails Foundation, and the Southern California Mountains Foundation and under the leadership of the Big Bear Valley Trails Coordinator.


            • C. Build human capital and promote enterprise, with a focus on environmentally friendly businesses, to strengthen the local economy and provide opportunities for residents and families to be self-reliant

              Action Statements

              C1. Promote child and youth development, social and civic responsibility, and environmental stewardship by establishing a multigenerational community council with youth in leadership positions to advocate for and support activities that enrich our community and our environment.

              C2. Establish entrepreneurship, business training, and career development programs in partnership with local colleges and universities that empower locals to grow careers or businesses related to the Big Bear Valley economy such as outdoor recreation, high altitude training, health, wellness, and rehabilitation services, environmental science, and natural resource extraction and management.

              C3. Coordinate with County of San Bernardino Human Services Department to assess local needs, such as wellness checks for seniors, substance abuse counseling, and support for families with children, and deliver mobile services and/or open a new service delivery location in Big Bear City.

              C4. Collaborate with the local chambers and County EDA to establish a valley-wide economic development initiative that links emerging entrepreneurs with mentors and potential investors and fosters new business development.

              C5. Identify barriers to and implement solutions for building environmentally sensitive recreational businesses (including mountain biking, rock climbing, model plane and drone flying, and high-altitude field training) on publicly owned land.


            • D. Become a destination renowned for culture, environment, health, and well-being for people of all ages and abilities

              Action Statements

              D1. Construct road access to Big Bear Valley Historical Museum from Greenway Drive.

              D2. Establish a resource conservation program to designate open space resources, establish a dedicated funding source, and actively promote open space protection through land acquisition, conservation easements, mitigation monitoring, volunteer support, and other similar tools.

              D3. Promote family- and eco-friendly tourism that educates people about our natural surroundings, dark skies, and quiet nature.

              D4. Enhance existing and create new cultural attractions for diverse groups of people with programs like Shakespeare in the Forest, a vaquero/cowboy festival, mining tours, and similar events.


            • E. Strengthen the relationship between Big Bear Valley and the County of San Bernardino to increase the County’s understanding of the community

              Action Statements

              E1. Establish a Bear Valley Municipal Advisory Council as an avenue for accurate and transparent communications between local residents, Big Bear Valley leaders, and County officials.


            Action Plan Matrices

            The Action Plan Matrix for each Action Statement listed above can be found in the compiled Action Plans, linked at the top of this page.

            How to Implement the Action Plans

            The Action Plans provide a general organization of the action steps necessary to implement each Action Statement. The Community may want to meet to identify the top three to five priority Action Statements to work on first. Some of these may be those actions that the community believes could be completed quickly and easily. Completion of one Action Statement will provide the community and local groups with the motivation to move forward with another Action Statement.

            Once an Action Statement is selected for implementation, the community identifies a Champion for that Action Statement to initiate activities, identify those responsible for carrying out action steps, identify and secure resources that will be required, and develop a timeline. The champion is not responsible for completing the action, but serves to facilitate and guide the Action Team. While suggested action steps are included in the guide, each community should develop more specific assignments based upon available community resources such as volunteers (e.g., individuals, businesses, property owners, etc.), community groups (e.g., chamber of commerce, non-profits, etc.) and organizations (e.g., scouts, community service districts, churches, schools, etc.). This step of planning for implementation is an important first step necessary to help ensure successful implementation.

            Potential resources are identified for each Action Statement. These may be guides on implementation, case studies of how other communities have implemented similar projects, sources of potential external funding, and organizations and agencies that can provide guidance and advice.

            A more detailed Implementation Plan will also be developed. The Implementation Plan will include information about how to inform the County about changes to your Community Action Guide. In addition, the County will want to know when work starts on an Action Statement and when each Action Statement is completed. It is important for the community to celebrate as actions are fulfilled.

            The Action Plans are Not Set in Stone

            The Action Plans are to be used to guide community actions and are not “set in stone”. Champions and Action Leaders are suggestions, but your community has a better idea of the best Champion for individual actions. The Action process is a general set of tasks that can be modified by the Champion, Action Leaders and/or Action Teams to best fit your community. The community should feel free to make changes and find alternatives for completing actions.

            The Community Development Toolkit

            San Bernardino County Land Use Services is in the process of creating an online Community Development Toolkit to expand the action topics and guidance on implementation as well as ideas for future amendments or additions to the Communities’ Action Guide.



          • Material in this section will be added as it is completed with community input. Click on each item for more information and a link to download the material.

            *RESCHEDULED* WRIGHTWOOD COMMUNITY WORKSHOP 2

            The second community workshop in the planning process for the Hilltop Community Plan has been rescheduled to:

            Date: February 22, 2017
            Time: 6:00 PM to 8:30 PM
            Location: Wrightwood Community Building, 1275 State Hwy 2 Wrightwood, CA 92397

            Highlights of this event will include:

            • See input generated from the first workshop
            • Discuss and rank Community goals
            • Discuss and rank objectives for priority goals
            • Discuss and rank specific actions that are necessary to achieve the goals and objectives

            Click here for more information about the event and the Wrightwood Community Plan.

            Click here to download a flyer for the dates, times, and locations of community workshops in the Wrightwood Community.

            *CANCELLED* Wrightwood CP | 01/23/17 Workshop #2

            Due to the Winter Weather Advisory and  hazardous driving conditions, we will be cancelling the second workshop for the Wrightwood community scheduled on Monday, January 23, 2017. The workshop will be rescheduled for a later date and more information will be provided as it becomes available. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. Please stay tuned to www.countywideplan.com/cp for updates and feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

            New Surveys for Framework & Foundation Community Plan Workshops!

            The County recently conducted public workshops in 15 communities as part of an effort to establish and update Framework & Foundation Community Plans.  During these workshops, we asked attendees to tell us about their community — both as they see it today and how they see it in the future.  The survey links below are for those who were unable to attend these workshops, or for those who attended but had additional thoughts and ideas.

            Click here to take Survey #1 for Workshop 1 in Oaks Hills, Baker, Wrightwood, El Mirage, Oro Grande, Newberry Springs, Daggett, and Yermo.

            Click here to take Survey #2 for Workshop 2 in Mt Baldy, Morongo Valley, Homestead Valley, Angelus Oaks, San Antonio Heights, Pioneertown, and Lytle Creek.

            Responses to these surveys will be considered alongside the input we received for each community during the workshops.  Have other questions or don’t see your community listed above?  Click here to see if your community is addressed by a Community Plan.

            These surveys will remain open until Thursday, January 27th, 2017.