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  • Goals
    1. Goal LU-1 Fiscally Sustainable Growth

      Growth and development that builds thriving communities, contributes to our Complete County, and is fiscally sustainable.

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    2. Goal LU-2 Land Use Mix and Compatibility

      An arrangement of land uses that balances the lifestyle of existing residents, the needs of future generations, opportunities for commercial and industrial development, and the value of the natural environment.

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    3. Goal LU-3 Annexations and Sphere Development

      Annexations and development in spheres of influence that improve the provision of public services to incorporated and unincorporated residents and businesses.

      GO TO GOAL
    4. Goal LU-4 Community Design

      Preservation and enhancement of unique community identities and their relationship with the natural environment

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    5. Goal LU-5 Military Mission

      The federal government maintains and invests in military facilities and operations in the county to further the mission of national defense, thereby generating employment opportunities for residents and commercial opportunities for businesses in the county.

      GO TO GOAL
    6. Goal LU-6 Amendments to the Policy Plan

      Growth and development in the unincorporated county in a manner that requires few and infrequent amendments to the Policy Plan

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    Policies
    1. Policy LU-1.1 Growth

      We support growth and development that is fiscally sustainable for the County. We accommodate growth in the unincorporated county when it benefits existing communities, provides a regional housing option for rural lifestyles, or supports the regional economy.

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    2. Policy LU-1.2 Infill development

      We prefer new development to take place on existing vacant and underutilized lots where public services and infrastructure are available.

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    3. Policy LU-1.3 Fiscal sustainability

      When determining fiscal impacts, we consider initial capital investments, long-term operations and maintenance, desired levels of service for public facilities and services, capital reserves for replacement, and impacts to existing uses in incorporated and unincorporated areas.

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    4. Policy LU-1.4 Funding and financing mechanisms

      We require the establishment of community facility districts, lighting and landscaping maintenance districts, and other types of funding and financing mechanisms for new development when the County determines that it may be necessary to maintain fiscal sustainability. We prefer the expansion of existing districts to the establishment of new districts.

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    5. Policy LU-1.5 Development impact fees

      We require payment of development impact fees to ensure that all new development pays its fair share of public infrastructure.

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    6. Policy LU-1.6 Tax sharing

      We may utilize tax sharing as a tool to extend public facilities and services from adjacent municipalities into unincorporated areas as an alternative to the County’s direct provision of public facilities and services when it is fiscally sustainable for the County.

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    7. Policy LU-2.1 Compatibility with existing uses

      We require that new development is located, scaled, buffered, and designed to minimize negative impacts on existing conforming uses and adjacent neighborhoods. We also require that new residential developments are located, scaled, buffered, and designed so as to not hinder the viability and continuity of existing conforming nonresidential development.

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    8. Policy LU-2.2 Compatibility with planned uses

      We require that new residential development is located, scaled, buffered, and designed to minimize negative impacts both on and from adjacent areas designated for nonresidential land uses.

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    9. Policy LU-2.3 Compatibility with natural environment

      We require that new development is located, scaled, buffered, and designed for compatibility with the surrounding natural environment and biodiversity.

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    10. Policy LU-2.4 Land Use Map consistency

      We consider proposed development that is consistent with the Land Use Map (i.e., it does not require a change in Land Use Category), to be generally compatible and consistent with surrounding land uses and a community’s identity. Additional site, building, and landscape design treatment, per other policies in the Policy Plan and development standards in the Development Code, may be required to maximize compatibility with surrounding land uses and community identity.

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    11. Policy LU-2.5 Hillside preservation

      We require that new development in sloping hillside areas preserve the natural character of the surrounding environment and does not further exacerbate natural hazards or erosion.

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    12. Policy LU-2.6 Coordination with adjacent entities

      We require that new and amended development projects notify and coordinate with adjacent local, state, and federal entities to maximize land use compatibility, inform future planning and implementation, and realize mutually beneficial outcomes.

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    13. Policy LU-2.7 Countywide jobs-housing balance

      We prioritize growth that furthers a countywide balance of jobs and housing to reduce vehicle miles traveled, increase job opportunities and household income, and improve quality of life. We also strive for growth that furthers a balance of jobs and housing in the North Desert region and the Valley region.

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    14. Policy LU-2.9 Suburban lifestyles in the Valley region

      We intend that new residential development in the unincorporated Valley region offer a suburban lifestyle that is similar to that of adjacent cities.

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    15. Policy LU-2.10 Unincorporated commercial development

      We intend that new commercial development in the unincorporated areas serve unincorporated residential areas, tourists, and/or freeway travelers. We encourage new commercial development to be concentrated to enhance pedestrian circulation and reduce vehicular congestion and vehicle miles traveled, with new development directed into existing centralized areas when possible.

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    16. Policy LU-2.12 Office and industrial development in the Valley region

      We encourage office and industrial uses in the unincorporated Valley region in order to promote a countywide jobs-housing balance.

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    17. Policy LU-2.13 Short-term private home rentals

      We enforce appropriate operation standards, maintenance standards, and permitting procedures for the establishment and maintenance of short-term private home rentals in the unincorporated areas.

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    18. Policy LU-2.14 Contiguous land administration

      We support the consolidation of disconnected land areas under public ownership or administration to increase financial and environmental value, streamline the management of land and resources, and establish more complete and effective transition areas or buffers. Such consolidation may include transfer of title of property among public entities and the purchase or swapping of private property voluntarily sold when the consolidation is fiscally neutral or beneficial to the County.

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    19. Policy LU-3.1 Annexation of unincorporated areas

      We support the annexation of unincorporated areas when it will result in a more effective and efficient provision of public services and a net fiscal benefit to the County.

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    20. Policy LU-3.2 Annexations with planned incompatible land uses

      We oppose annexations when future planned land uses for the proposed annexation area would be incompatible with the remaining adjacent unincorporated lands.

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    21. Policy LU-3.3 City/town standards in SOIs

      Upon negotiation with individual jurisdictions, we may require new development in unincorporated municipal sphere of influence areas to apply the improvement standards for roads and sidewalks of the incorporated jurisdiction.

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    22. Policy LU-3.4 Development project annexations

      When a property owner proposes annexation to facilitate new development adjacent to an unincorporated residential area, we prefer that the annexation includes the adjacent residential area.

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    23. Policy LU-4.1 Context-sensitive design in the Mountain/Desert regions

      We require new development to employ site and building design techniques and use building materials that reflect the natural mountain or desert environment and preserve scenic resources.

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    24. Policy LU-4.2 Fire-adapted communities

      We require new development in high or very high fire hazard severity zones to apply fire-resistant design techniques, including fuel modification areas, fire resistant landscaping, and fire-resistant building materials.

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    25. Policy LU-4.3 Native or drought-tolerant landscaping

      We require new development, when outside of high and very high fire hazard severity zones, to install and maintain drought-tolerant landscaping and encourage the use of native species.

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    26. Policy LU-4.5 Community identity

      We require that new development be consistent with and reinforce the physical and historical character and identity of our unincorporated communities, as described in Table LU-3 and in the values section of Community Action Guides. In addition, we consider the aspirations section of Community Action Guides in our review of new development.

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    27. Policy LU-4.6 Adaptive reuse

      We encourage the rehabilitation, adaptive reuse, and revitalization of existing structures to preserve and celebrate the unique sense of place, identity, and history of our communities.

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    28. Policy LU-4.7 Dark skies

      We minimize light pollution and glare to preserve views of the night sky, particularly in the Mountain and Desert regions where dark skies are fundamentally connected to community identities and local economies. We also promote the preservation of dark skies to assist the military in testing, training, and operations.

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    29. Policy LU-4.8 Public gathering spaces

      We require the development of safe and attractive public gathering spaces that facilitate social interaction, community events, and physical activity in master planned communities, large residential developments, and large commercial developments.

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    30. Policy LU-4.9 CPTED

      We require public gathering spaces to use CPTED (crime prevention through environmental design) principles and ensure sufficient access for public safety services.

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    31. Policy LU-4.10 Entry monumentation, signage, and public art

      We encourage the installation of durable signage, entry monumentation, and/or works of public art in commercial areas of unincorporated Community Planning Areas as a means of reinforcing a community’s character, culture, heritage, or other unique features.

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    32. Policy LU-5.1 Military land use compatibility

      We coordinate with military stakeholders to ensure compatible land uses in areas where military operations on or off installations could affect public health and safety, or where civilian activities could have an impact on current or future military operations. We will coordinate with military stakeholders to resolve existing land use conflicts and protect public safety in the Military Influence Overlay.

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    33. Policy LU-5.2 Military Influence Overlay

      We require conditional use permits for projects within the Military Influence Overlay that could penetrate the defined floor elevation of the military airspace, or that could encroach upon military operations. We consider how development of roads and infrastructure within the Military Influence Overlay will promote growth that might lead to incompatible land use.

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    34. Policy LU-5.3 Open space for military activity and buffering

      We engage with military installations to preserve open space areas to facilitate military training and operations and to buffer civilian areas from military activity.

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    35. Policy LU-5.4 Ranged activities and projects

      We require activities and projects that can exert impacts beyond project boundaries, such as renewable energy facilities, wireless communication systems, and unmanned aircraft systems, to coordinate with military installations in preliminary planning and throughout the project’s construction stages and long-term operation.

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    36. Policy LU-5.5 Transportation and infrastructure

      We consider military needs for operations and training when planning and improving local and regional transportation and infrastructure systems.

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    37. Policy LU-5.6 Military partnerships

      We maintain effective partnerships among military and community stakeholders and pursue joint projects that provide long-term mutual benefits for the military, County, and general public.

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    38. Policy LU-5.7 Economic development opportunities with the military

      We leverage our relationship and increased coordination with the military to expand employment and commercial opportunities with military agencies.

      GO TO POLICY
    39. Policy LU-6.3 Commercial amendments

      We will only approve Land Use Plan amendments that would introduce new commercial areas in the context of a comprehensive Land Use Plan amendment. We may waive this requirement when the proposed amended area abuts an existing or designated commercial area and the amount of land available for new commercial uses falls below 15 percent of the total commercially-designated land in the area.

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    40. Policy LU-6.4 Industrial amendments near schools and parks

      We approve Land Use Plan amendments for new industrial development only if they are at least one-half mile from an existing or planned public primary or secondary school or public park. We may waive this requirement for obsolete school or park sites or for industrial amendments submitted through a specific plan.

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    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps LU-1(A-E) Land Use Map (PDF | WEB)
    2. Policy Maps LU-2 General Boundaries (PDF | WEB)
    3. Policy Maps LU-3 Military Influence Overlay (PDF | WEB)
    4. Policy Tables Tables LU-1 to LU-3 (PDF only)
  • Goals
    1. Goal H-1 Housing Production and Supply

      A broad range of housing types in sufficient quantity, location, and affordability levels that meet the lifestyle needs of current and future residents, including those with special needs.

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    2. Goal H-2 Governmental Development Regulations

      An efficient administrative process that recognizes the need for efficient and timely review of residential projects while also ensuring and valuing the need for quality design, environmental review, and planning.

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    3. Goal H-3 Housing and Neighborhood Quality

      Neighborhoods that protect the health, safety, and welfare of the community, and enhance public and private efforts in maintaining, reinvesting in, and upgrading the existing housing stock.

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    4. Goal H-4 AFFORDABLE HOUSING ASSISTANCE

      The development, maintenance, modernization, and preservation of affordable housing; and the provision of assistance, where feasible, for residents to rent or purchase adequate housing in San Bernardino County.

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    5. Goal H-5 Implementation and Monitoring

      A planning and monitoring system whereby housing, employment, environmental, and other program data are integrated in a cohesive manner to implement the County’s housing vision.

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    6. Goal V/H-1 Valley Region

      A diversity of housing and neighborhood improvement and preservation strategies that address the needs of residents living in county islands and spheres of influence

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    Policies
    1. Policy H-1.1 Appropriate range of housing

      We encourage the production and location of a range of housing types, densities, and affordability levels in a manner that recognizes the unique characteristics, issues, and opportunities for each community.

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    2. Policy H-1.2 Concurrent infrastructure

      We support the integrated planning and provision of appropriate infrastructure (including water, sewer, and roadways) concurrent with and as a condition of residential development to create more livable communities.

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    3. Policy H-1.3 Quality multiple-family standards

      We enforce multiple-family residential development standards, amenity requirements, and other regulations to ensure the development of quality rental and homeownership opportunities for residents.

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    4. Policy H-1.4 RHNA transfers with annexation

      We work with the Southern California Association of Governments, Local Agency Formation Commission, and cities to develop agreements for the transfer of the regional housing need allocation as a precondition for annexations.

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    5. Policy H-1.5 Life-cycle costs

      We encourage energy-conservation techniques and upgrades in both the construction and rehabilitation of residential units that will reduce the life-cycle costs of housing.

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    6. Policy H-2.1 Development Code review

      We review the Development Code regularly for possible revisions that might unduly constrain the production or rehabilitation of residential development.

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    7. Policy H-2.2 Small lot sizes

      We continue to utilize Planned Development density bonus and density transfer provisions as described in the County Development Code to allow the development of lot sizes less than that normally required by residential land use districts.

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    8. Policy H-2.3 Flexible standards

      We allow flexibility in the application of residential and mixed-use development standards to gain benefits such as exceptional design quality, economic advantages, sustainability, or other benefits that would not otherwise be realized.

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    9. Policy H-2.4 Incentives

      We maintain incentives that can be offered when projects provide benefits to the community such as exceptional design quality, economic advantages, environmental sustainability, or other benefits that would not otherwise be realized.

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    10. Policy H-2.5 Certain and transparent process

      We maintain a residential development review process that provides certainty and transparency for project stakeholders and the public, yet allows for the appropriate review to facilitate quality housing development.

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    11. Policy H-2.6 Critical infrastructure

      We ensure that the efficient provision of critical infrastructure accompanies residential development and the building of complete communities, and ensure that the costs are fairly apportioned to the development community.

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    12. Policy H-3.1 Public Services, amenities, and safety

      We support the provision of adequate and fiscally sustainable public services, infrastructure, open space, non-motorized transportation routes, and public safety for neighborhoods in the unincorporated area.

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    13. Policy H-3.2 Code enforcement

      We support the timely removal of neighborhood blight through graffiti abatement, abandoned or inoperative automobile removal, trash and debris removal, housing repair, and other code enforcement efforts.

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    14. Policy H-3.3 Housing maintenance

      We enforce all applicable state and county health, safety, building, and zoning laws directed at housing and property maintenance to maintain healthful, sound, and attractive residential properties.

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    15. Policy H-3.4 Housing rehabilitation and improvement

      We encourage the rehabilitation, repair, and improvement of single-family, multiple family housing, and mobile homes and, if needed, the demolition of substandard housing through available loan and grant programs.

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    16. Policy H-3.5 Inspection of subsidized housing

      We inspect or facilitate the inspection of assisted multifamily rental housing, contract shelters, voucher hotels, and other housing projects on a regular basis to ensure that properties are regularly repaired and maintained in good condition.

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    17. Policy Policy H-3.6 Neighborhood improvements

      We support comprehensive neighborhood efforts to address housing conditions, property maintenance, infrastructure repair, public safety, landscaping, and other issues affecting the livability of neighborhoods

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    18. Policy H-4.1 At-Risk units

      We preserve publicly assisted and multiple-family housing units that are at risk of converting from lower income affordability to market rents due to the completion of affordability covenants or funding contracts.

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    19. Policy H-4.2 Rental assistance

      We support the provision of rental assistance to qualified extremely low, very low, and low income households and special needs households served by the County Housing Authority, Department of Behavioral Health, and other County entities.

      GO TO POLICY
    20. Policy Policy H-4.3 Homeowner assistance

      We support the expansion of homeownership opportunities and preservation by offering financial assistance when available, working in collaboration with partners to increase funding, and supporting foreclosure prevention programs.

      GO TO POLICY
    21. Policy Policy H-4.4 Modernize and replace multiple-family projects

      We support the Housing Authority’s efforts to modernize and replace, where needed, existing multiple-family projects to provide safe, sound, and affordable housing options for qualified low income individuals and families.

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    22. Policy Policy H-4.5 Nonprofit partnerships

      We continue to form and strengthen partnerships with nonprofit organizations, public agencies, community-based organizations, and housing developers in order to increase housing opportunities for very low and low income and special needs households.

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    23. Policy Policy H-4.6 Housing discrimination

      We further fair housing opportunities by prohibiting discrimination in the housing market; providing education, support, and enforcement services to address discriminatory practices; and removing potential impediments to equal housing opportunity.

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    24. Policy H-5.1 Reporting activities

      We support the planning and reporting of housing activities throughout the County in a manner that can be readily integrated into the housing element and useful for the development and refinement of policy and programs. This effort will contain:

      • Annual housing element production totals
      • Grantee performance reports for the consolidated plan
      • Projects funded by the Department of Behavioral Health
      • Progress in the Homeless Service Continuum of Care efforts

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    25. Policy H-5.2 Local and regional infrastructure

      We support the integrated planning and provision of appropriate infrastructure (including water, sewer, stormwater, and roadways) to create more livable residential environments. This effort will contain:
      • Cooperation with the San Bernardino Local Agency Formation Commission and service providers in service planning
      • Coordination of capital improvement planning efforts with cities and through the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority
      • Review minimum improvement standards for rural areas in the update of the County development code
      • Coordination with the Southern California Association of Governments to include transportation improvements into the regional transportation plan

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    26. Policy V/H-1.1 Housing compatibility

      We encourage housing types and designs that are compatible with established land use patterns and the environment of the region, including single-family dwellings, mobile home parks/manufactured home land-leased communities, and apartments.

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    27. Policy V/H-1.2 Rehabilitation target areas

      We identify areas targeted for rehabilitation to enhance the housing inventory of the Valley Region. These areas may include but are not limited to: North Chino, West and South Fontana, South Montclair, Bloomington, Muscoy, and other, similar areas

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    28. Policy V/H-1.3 Preferred housing types

      Within the Valley Region, we favor the following types of development: urban infill, single family detached (specifically adjacent to the Foothill Freeway corridors), clustered development with single-family appearance, and single-family detached on large lots.

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    29. Policy V/H-1.4 Pre-annexation coordination

      For unincorporated islands that are planned for eventual annexation, we work with cities to encourage and approve residential projects that are consistent with the general plans and design guidelines for annexing cities.

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  • Goals
    1. Goal IU-1 Water Supply

      Water supply and infrastructure are sufficient for the needs of residents and businesses and are resilient to drought

      GO TO GOAL
    2. Goal IU-2 Wastewater Treatment and Disposal

      Residents and businesses in unincorporated areas have safe and sanitary systems for wastewater collection, treatment, and disposal

      GO TO GOAL
    3. Goal IU-3 Stormwater Drainage

      A regional stormwater drainage backbone and local stormwater facilities in unincorporated areas that reduce the risk of flooding

      GO TO GOAL
    4. Goal IU-4 Solid Waste

      Adequate regional landfill capacity that provides for the safe disposal of solid waste, and efficient waste diversion and collection for unincorporated areas.

      GO TO GOAL
    5. Goal IU-5 Power and Communications

      Unincorporated area residents and businesses have access to reliable power and communication systems

      GO TO GOAL
    Policies
    1. Policy IU-1.1 Water supply

      We require that new development be connected to a public water system or a County-approved well to ensure a clean and resilient supply of potable water, even during cases of prolonged drought.

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    2. Policy IU-1.2 Water for military installations

      We collaborate with military installations to avoid impacts on military training and operations from groundwater contamination and inadequate groundwater supply.

      GO TO POLICY
    3. Policy IU-1.3 Recycled water

      We promote the use of recycled water for landscaping, groundwater recharge, direct potable reuse, and other applicable uses in order to supplement groundwater supplies.

      GO TO POLICY
    4. Policy IU-1.5 Agricultural water use

      We encourage water-efficient irrigation and the use of non-potable and recycled water for agricultural uses.

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    5. Policy IU-1.6 User fees

      For water systems operated by County Special Districts, we establish user fees that cover operation and maintenance costs and set aside adequate reserves for capital upgrades and improvements.

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    6. Policy IU-1.7 Areas vital for groundwater recharge

      We allow new development on areas vital for groundwater recharge when stormwater management facilities are installed onsite and maintained to infiltrate predevelopment levels of stormwater into the ground.

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    7. Policy IU-1.8 Groundwater management coordination

      We collaborate with watermasters, groundwater sustainability agencies, water purveyors, and other government agencies to ensure groundwater basins are being sustainably managed. We discourage new development when it would create or aggravate groundwater overdraft conditions, land subsidence, or other “undesirable results” as defined in the California Water Code. We require safe yields for groundwater sources covered by the Desert Groundwater Management Ordinance.

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    8. Policy IU-1.9 Water conservation

      We encourage water conserving site design and the use of water conserving fixtures, and advocate for the adoption and implementation of water conservation strategies by water service agencies. For existing County-owned facilities, we incorporate design elements, building materials, fixtures, and landscaping that reduce water consumption, as funding is available.

      GO TO POLICY
    9. Policy IU-1.10 Connected systems

      We encourage local water distribution systems to interconnect with regional and other local systems, where feasible, to assist in the transfer of water resources during droughts and emergencies.

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    10. Policy IU-1.11 Water storage and conveyance

      We assist in development of additional water storage and conveyance facilities to create a resilient regional water supply system, when it is cost effective for County-owned water and stormwater systems.

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    11. Policy IU-2.1 Minimum parcel size

      We require new lots smaller than one-half acre to be served by a sewer system. We may require sewer service for larger lot sizes depending on local soil and groundwater conditions, and the County’s Local Area Management Program.

      GO TO POLICY
    12. Policy IU-2.2 User fees

      For wastewater systems operated by County Special Districts, we establish user fees that cover operation and maintenance costs and set aside adequate reserves for capital upgrades and improvements.

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    13. Policy IU-2.3 Shared wastewater facilities for recycled water

      We encourage an expansion of recycled water agreements between wastewater entities to share and/or create connections between wastewater systems to expand the use of recycled water.

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    14. Policy IU-3.1 Regional flood control

      We maintain a regional flood control system and regularly evaluate the need for and implement upgrades based on changing land coverage and hydrologic conditions in order to manage and reduce flood risk. We require any public and private projects proposed anywhere in the county to address and mitigate any adverse impacts on the carrying capacity and stormwater velocity of regional stormwater drainage systems.

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    15. Policy IU-3.2 Local flood control

      We require new development to install and maintain stormwater management facilities that maintain predevelopment hydrology and hydraulic conditions.

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    16. Policy IU-3.3 Recreational use

      We prefer that stormwater facilities be designed and maintained to allow for regional open space and safe recreation use without compromising the ability to provide flood risk reduction.

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    17. Policy IU-3.4 Natural floodways

      We retain existing natural floodways and watercourses on County-controlled floodways, including natural channel bottoms, unless hardening and channelization is the only feasible way to manage flood risk. On floodways not controlled by the County, we encourage the retention of natural floodways and watercourses. Our priority is to reduce flood risk, but we also strive to protect wildlife corridors, prevent loss of critical habitat, and improve the amount and quality of surface water and groundwater resources.

      GO TO POLICY
    18. Policy IU-3.5 Fair share requirements

      We require new development to pay its fair share of capital costs to maintain adequate capacity of the County’s regional flood control systems.

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    19. Policy IU-4.1 Landfill capacity

      We maintain a minimum ongoing landfill capacity of 15 years to serve unincorporated waste disposal needs.

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    20. Policy IU-4.2 Transfer stations

      We locate and operate transfer stations based on overall system efficiency.

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    21. Policy IU-4.3 Waste diversion

      We shall meet or exceed state waste diversion requirements, augment future landfill capacity, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions and use of natural resources through the reduction, reuse, or recycling of solid waste.

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    22. Policy IU-4.4 Landfill funding

      We require sufficient fees for use of County landfills to cover capital costs; ongoing operation, maintenance, and closure costs of existing landfills; and the costs and liabilities associated with closed landfills.

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    23. Policy IU-5.1 Electricity and natural gas service

      We partner with other public agencies and providers to improve the availability and stability of electricity and natural gas service in unincorporated communities.

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    24. Policy IU-5.2 Expanded high-speed internet and wireless communication

      We encourage the expansion of expand affordable, high-speed internet access in underserved and unserved unincorporated communities. We encourage the expansion of advanced mobile and fixed wireless communication technologies that improve service, coverage, and reliability throughout the county.

      GO TO POLICY
    25. Policy IU-5.3 Underground facilities

      We encourage new and relocated power and communication facilities to be located underground when feasible, particularly in the Mountain and Desert regions.

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    26. Policy IU-5.4 Electric transmission lines

      We support the maintenance of existing and development of new electric transmission lines along existing rights-of-way and easements to maintain the stability and capacity of the electric distribution system in southern California.

      GO TO POLICY
    27. Policy IU-5.5 Energy and fuel facilities

      We encourage the development and upgrade of energy and regional fuel facilities in areas that do not pose significant environmental or public health and safety hazards, and in a manner that is compatible with military operations and local community identity.

      GO TO POLICY
    28. Policy IU-5.6 Dig once approach

      We encourage infrastructure, telecommunication, and utility planning and projects to coordinate so that improvements are made concurrently or in such a manner that minimizes disruption to rights-of-way and reduces costs.

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    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps IU-1 Water Service Wholesale Provider (PDF | WEB)
    2. Policy Maps IU-2 Groundwater Basins (PDF | WEB)
    3. Policy Maps IU-3 Wastewater Treatment Facilities (PDF | WEB)
    4. Policy Maps IU-4 Regional Flood Control Facilities (PDF | WEB)
    5. Policy Maps IU-5 Waste Disposal & Landfills (PDF | WEB)
    6. Policy Maps IU-6 Natural Gas Service (PDF | WEB)
    7. Policy Maps IU-7 Electric Utility Service (PDF | WEB)
  • Goals
    1. Goal TM-1 Roadway Capacity

      Unincorporated areas served by roads with capacity that is adequate for residents, businesses, tourists, and emergency services

      GO TO GOAL
    2. Goal TM-2 Road Design Standards

      Roads designed and built to standards in the unincorporated areas that reflect the rural, suburban, and urban context as well as the regional (valley, mountain, and desert) context

      GO TO GOAL
    3. Goal TM-3 Vehicle Miles Traveled

      A pattern of development and transportation system that minimizes vehicle miles traveled

      GO TO GOAL
    4. Goal TM-4 Complete Streets, Transit, and Active Transportation

      On- and off-street improvements that provide functional alternatives to private car usage and promote active transportation in mobility focus areas

      GO TO GOAL
    5. Goal TM-5 Goods Movement

      A road, rail, and air transportation system that supports the logistics industry and minimizes congestion in unincorporated areas.

      GO TO GOAL
    6. TM-6 Airports

      A network of local and regional airports that meet regional and local aviation needs.

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    Policies
    1. Policy TM-1.1 Roadway level of service (LOS)

      We require our roadways to be built to achieve the following minimum level of service standards during peak commute periods (typically 7:00-9:00 AM and 4:00-6:00 PM on a weekday):
      • LOS D in the Valley Region
      • LOS D in the Mountain Region
      • LOS C in the North and East Desert Regions

      GO TO POLICY
    2. Policy TM-1.2 Interjurisdictional roadway consistency

      We promote consistent cross-sections along roads traversing incorporated and unincorporated areas.

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    3. Policy TM-1.3 Freeways and highways

      We coordinate with Caltrans and regional transportation agencies and support the use of state, federal, and other agency funds to improve freeways and highways.

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    4. Policy TM-1.4 Unpaved roadways

      The County does not accept new unpaved roads into the County Maintained Road System, and we require all-weather treatment for all new unpaved roads.

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    5. Policy TM-1.5 Upgrading unpaved roads

      We support the paving of unpaved roads when funding is contributed through a local area funding and financing mechanism.

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    6. Policy TM-1.6 Paved roads

      For any new development for which paved roads are required, we require the developer to construct the roads and we require the establishment of a special funding and financing mechanism to pay for roadway operation, maintenance, and set-aside reserves.

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    7. Policy TM-1.7 Fair share contributions

      We require new development to pay its fair share contribution toward off-site transportation improvements.

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    8. Policy TM-1.8 Emergency access

      When considering new roadway improvement proposals for the CIP or RTP, we consider the provision of adequate emergency access routes along with capacity expansion in unincorporated areas. Among access route improvements, we prioritize those that contribute some funding through a local area funding and financing mechanism.

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    9. Policy TM-1.9 New transportation options

      We support the use of transportation network companies, autonomous vehicles, micro transit, and other emerging transportation options that reduce congestion, minimize land area needed for roadways, create more pedestrian- and bicycle-friendly streets, reduce VMT, or reduce dependence on privately-owned vehicles.

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    10. Policy TM-2.1 Context sensitive approach

      We maintain and periodically update required roadway cross sections that prioritize multi-modal systems inside mobility focus areas (based on community context), and vehicular capacity on roadways outside of mobility focus areas (based on regional context).

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    11. Policy TM-2.2 Roadway improvements

      We require roadway improvements that reinforce the character of the area, such as curbs and gutters, sidewalks, landscaping, street lighting, and pedestrian and bicycle facilities. We require fewer improvements in rural areas and more improvements in urbanized areas, consistent with the Development Code. Additional standards may be required in municipal spheres of influence.

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    12. Policy TM-2.3 Concurrent improvements

      We require new development to mitigate project transportation impacts no later than prior to occupancy of the development to ensure transportation improvements are delivered concurrent with future development.

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    13. Policy TM-2.4 Atypical intersection controls

      We allow the use of atypical intersection concepts such as roundabouts when they improve traffic flow and safety compared to conventional intersection controls.

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    14. Policy TM-2.5 Context-based features

      When making road improvements, we provide feasible, context-based transportation features such as:
      • Chain installation and inspection areas in the Mountain Region
      • Slow-vehicle turnouts on roadways with steep grades
      • Limited on-street parking areas to serve snow-plow or emergency services
      • Passing lanes in rural areas
      • Vista areas along scenic routes

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    15. Policy TM-2.6 Access control

      We promote shared/central access points for direct access to roads in unincorporated areas to minimize vehicle conflict points and improve safety, especially access points for commercial uses on adjacent properties.

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    16. Policy TM-3.1 VMT reduction

      We promote new development that will reduce household and employment VMT relative to existing conditions.

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    17. Policy TM-3.2 Trip reduction strategies

      We support the implementation of transportation demand management techniques, mixed use strategies, and the placement of development in proximity to job and activity centers to reduce the number and length of vehicular trips.

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    18. Policy TM-3.3 First mile/last mile connectivity

      We support strategies that strengthen first/last mile connectivity to enhance the viability and expand the utility of public transit in unincorporated areas and countywide.

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    19. Policy TM-4.1 Complete streets network

      We maintain a network of complete streets within mobility focus areas that provide for the mobility of all users of all ages and all abilities, while reflecting the local context.

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    20. Policy TM-4.2 Complete streets improvements

      We evaluate the feasibility of installing elements of complete street improvements when planning roadway improvements in mobility focus areas, and we require new development to contribute to complete street improvements in mobility focus areas. In evaluating complete street improvements, we prioritize those in mobility focus areas that are within unincorporated environmental justice focus areas.

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    21. Policy TM-4.3 Funding

      We partner with SBCTA, Caltrans, and local agencies to fund active transportation systems in the county. We encourage unincorporated communities to apply for funding and cooperate with them in their funding applications for active transportation improvements that are identified in a non-motorized transportation plan that is accepted or adopted by the County.

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    22. Policy TM-4.4 Transit access for residents in unincorporated areas

      We support and work with local transit agencies to generate a public transportation system, with fixed routes and on-demand service, that provide residents of unincorporated areas with access to jobs, public services, shopping, and entertainment throughout the county.

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    23. Policy TM-4.5 Transit access to job centers and tourist destinations

      We support and work with local transit agencies to generate public transportation systems that provide access to job centers and reduce congestion in tourist destinations in unincorporated areas.

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    24. Policy TM-4.6 Transit access to public service, health, and wellness

      In unincorporated areas where public transit is available, we prefer new public and behavioral health facilities, other public facilities and services, education facilities, grocery stores, and pharmacies to be located within one-half mile of a public transit stop. We encourage and plan to locate new County health and wellness facilities within one-half mile of a public transit stop in incorporated jurisdictions. We encourage public K-12 education and court facilities to be located within one-half mile of public transit.

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    25. Policy TM-4.7 Regional bicycle network

      We work with SBCTA and other local agencies to develop and maintain a regional backbone bicycle network.

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    26. Policy TM-4.8 Local bicycle and pedestrian networks

      We support local bike and pedestrian facilities that serve unincorporated areas, connect to facilities in adjacent incorporated areas, and connect to regional trails. We prioritize bicycle and pedestrian network improvements that provide safe and continuous pedestrian and bicycle access to mobility focus areas, schools, parks, and major transit stops.

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    27. Policy TM-4.9 Bike and pedestrian safety

      We promote pedestrian and bicyclist safety by providing separated pedestrian and bike crossings when we construct or improve bridges over highways, freeways, rail facilities, and flood control areas. We monitor pedestrian and bicycle traffic accidents and promote safety improvements in unincorporated high-accident areas.

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    28. Policy TM-4.10 Shared parking

      We support the use of shared parking facilities that provide safe and convenient pedestrian connectivity between adjacent uses.

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    29. Policy TM-4.11 Parking areas

      We require publicly accessible parking areas to ensure that pedestrians and bicyclists can safely access the site and onsite businesses from the public right-of-way.

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    30. Policy TM-5.1 Efficient and sustainable goods movement network

      We advocate for the maintenance of a goods movement system in southern California that is efficient and sustainable and that prioritizes public health through the use of zero‐emission equipment and infrastructure.

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    31. Policy TM-5.2 Intermodal facility

      We support the development of an intermodal facility in connection with the Southern California Logistics Airport.

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    32. Policy TM-5.3 High Desert Corridor

      We support the development of the High Desert Corridor to improve the regional goods movement network and foster economic development in the North Desert region.

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    33. Policy TM-5.4 Grade separations

      We support grade separations to reduce conflicts between rail facilities and roadways, subject to available funding.

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    34. Policy TM-5.5 Countywide truck routes

      We support SBCTA’s establishment of regional truck routes that efficiently distribute regional truck traffic while minimizing impacts on residents. We support funding through the RTP to build adequate truck route infrastructure.

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    35. Policy TM-5.6 Unincorporated truck routes

      We establish local truck routes in unincorporated areas to efficiently funnel truck traffic to freeways while minimizing impacts on residents. We establish routes where trucks are prohibited in unincorporated environmental justice focus areas and to avoid overlaps or conflicts with safe routes to schools.

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    36. Policy TM-5.7 Trucking-intensive businesses

      We require trucking-intensive businesses to pay their fair share of costs to build and maintain adequate roads.

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    37. Policy TM-6.1 Local airports

      We maintain County airports and coordinate with other local airports to provide general aviation services to residents and businesses throughout the county.

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    38. Policy TM-6.2 Economic potential

      We seek to maximize the economic development potential of County airports.

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    39. Policy TM-6.3 Regional airports

      We advocate for expanded passenger and cargo service at regional airports.

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    40. Policy TM-6.4 Airport land use compatibility

      We require proposed development in unincorporated areas to be consistent with applicable airport master plans, airport safety review areas, and military air installation compatible use zones. We may support proposed development in the influence area of County airports only when they are consistent with applicable airport master plans.

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    41. Policy TM-6.5 Coordination on airport planning

      We collaborate with FAA, military installations, Caltrans Division of Aeronautics, airport owners, neighboring jurisdictions, and other stakeholders in the preparation, update, and maintenance of airport-related plans.

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    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps TM-1(A-E) Roadway Network (PDF | WEB)
    2. Policy Maps TM-2 Transit Network (PDF | WEB)
    3. Policy Maps TM-3 Mobility Focus Areas (PDF | WEB)
    4. Policy Maps TM-4 SBCTA Bicycle Plan (PDF | WEB)
    5. Policy Maps TM-5 Goods Movement (PDF | WEB)
    6. Policy Maps TM-6 Airports (PDF | WEB)
  • Goals
    1. Goal PP-1 Law Enforcement

      Effective crime prevention and law enforcement that leads to a real and perceived sense of public safety for residents, visitors, and businesses.

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    2. Goal PP-2 Law & Justice

      An equitable justice system for violations of law in the county, adequate care and effective rehabilitation for inmates in the County’s custody, and the holistic rehabilitation and aided reentry and transition of parolees, probationers, and others living in the county engaged by the criminal justice system.

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    3. Goal PP-3 Fire and Emergency Medical

      Reduced risk of death, injury, property damage, and economic loss due to fires and other natural disasters, accidents, and medical incidents through prompt and capable emergency response.

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    4. Goal PP-3 Fire and Emergency Medical

      Reduced risk of death, injury, property damage, and economic loss due to fires and other natural disasters, accidents, and medical incidents through prompt and capable emergency response.

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    5. Goal PP-4 Emergency Preparedness and Recovery

      A reduced risk of and impact from injury, loss of life, property damage, and economic and social disruption resulting from emergencies, natural disasters, and potential changes in climate.

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    Policies
    1. Policy PP-1.1 Law enforcement services

      The Sheriff’s Department provides law enforcement services for unincorporated areas and distributes resources geographically while balancing levels of service and financial resources with continuously changing needs for personal and property protection.

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    2. Policy PP-1.2 Contract law enforcement

      When requested, the Sheriff’s Department provide law enforcement services to incorporated jurisdictions by contract at the full cost of services as determined by the County, without direct subsidy by the County.

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    3. Policy PP-1.3 Holistic approach to crime prevention

      We recognize that the roots of crime are found throughout a spectrum of psychological, social, economic, and environmental issues, and we coordinate proactive planning and activities among the Sheriff’s Department and county and non-county agencies and organizations to intervene and effectively prevent crime.

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    4. Policy PP-1.4 Crime prevention resource allocation

      The Sheriff’s Department uses crime data analysis, professional expertise, and community input to allocate patrols and other crime prevention resources.

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    5. Policy PP-1.5 Community-based crime prevention

      The Sheriff’s Department provides a range of outreach, education, and training programs for community-based and school-based crime prevention.

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    6. Policy PP-1.6 Agency partnerships

      The Sheriff’s Department partners with other local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies and private security providers to enhance law enforcement service.

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    7. Policy PP-1.7 Community partnerships

      The Sheriff’s Department establishes and maintains partnerships to help identify public safety needs, strengthen community confidence, and improve service to our communities.

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    8. Policy PP-1.8 Public awareness

      The Sheriff’s Department engages the media and our communities to improve the public’s perception and awareness of personal and property protection and safety.

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    9. Policy PP-1.9 Periodic needs assessment

      The Sheriff’s Department periodically assesses their facility, equipment, and staffing needs and use the assessment to allocate funding resources in the annual budget and capital improvement program.

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    10. Policy PP-1.10 Qualified workforce

      The Sheriff’s Department attracts and retains a qualified workforce of law enforcement and support personnel, reflective of the people they serve, and invest in training and ongoing education.

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    11. Policy PP-2.1 Equity

      We, in conjunction with the Sheriff’s Department, monitor and improve our law and justice functions, including for those accused of violating state and local law, victims, and witnesses, to ensure that individuals and corporations are treated equitably.

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    12. Policy PP-2.2 Capacity

      We advocate for and support sufficient capacity in the justice system, including the criminal and civil courts, District Attorney’s office, and Public Defender’s office, to effectively and efficiently adjudicate violations of law committed in the county.

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    13. Policy PP-2.3 Information sharing

      We continually improve the sharing of non-privileged information from the time of arrest through trial, among the Sheriff’s Department and city police departments, courts, District Attorney’s office, Public Defender’s office, and Probation Department.

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    14. Policy PP-2.4 Housing and care of inmates

      We provide adequate care and effective rehabilitation for those incarcerated in County jails or housed in County juvenile detention facilities, consistent with state and federal law, and we advocate for adequate state funding.

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    15. Policy PP-2.5 Support for victims and witnesses

      In conjunction with the District Attorney’s office, we provide supportive services for victims of and witnesses to crime through a holistic approach considering physical, psychological, and basic needs.

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    16. Policy PP-2.6 Recidivism

      To prevent recidivism, we provide holistic rehabilitation to those incarcerated and engaged in the reentry process, and provide coordinated services through the departments and agencies associated with law and justice, human services, economic development, and housing, as well as other agencies and nongovernmental organizations.

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    17. Policy PP-3.1 Fire and emergency medical services

      We maintain a sufficient number and distribution of fire stations, up-to-date equipment, and fully-trained staff to respond effectively to emergencies.

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    18. Policy PP-3.2 Fire District

      We support the expansion of the Fire District to serve additional incorporated jurisdictions, and the use of special funding and financing mechanisms to augment Fire District revenues to improve service and coverage.

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    19. Policy PP-3.3 Search and rescue

      We maintain up-to-date equipment and fully-trained staff to provide urban search and rescue and swift water rescue emergency response.

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    20. Policy PP-3.4 Fire prevention services

      We proactively mitigate or reduce the negative effects of fire, hazardous materials release, and structural collapse by implementing the California Fire Code, adopted with County amendments.

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    21. Policy PP-3.5 Firefighting water supply and facilities

      We coordinate with water providers to maintain adequate water supply, pressure, and facilities to protect people and property from urban fires and wildfires.

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    22. Policy PP-3.6 Concurrent protection services

      We require that fire department facilities, equipment, and staffing required to serve new development are operating prior to, or in conjunction with new development.

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    23. Policy PP-3.7 Fire safe design

      We require new development in the Fire Safety Overlay to comply with additional site design, building, and access standards to provide enhanced resistance to fire hazards.

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    24. Policy PP-3.8 Fire-adapted communities

      We inform and prepare our residents and businesses to collaboratively plan and take action to more safely coexist with the risk of wildfires.

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    25. Policy PP-3.9 Street and premise signage

      We require adequate street signage and premise identification be provided and maintained to ensure emergency services can quickly and efficiently respond.

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    26. Policy PP-3.10 Community outreach

      We engage with local schools, community groups, and businesses to increase awareness of fire risk, prevention, and evacuation.

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    27. Policy PP-3.11 Post-burn risk

      In areas burned by wildfire, we require new and reconstructed development to adhere to current development standards, and may require additional study to evaluate increased flooding, debris flow, and mudslide risks.

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    28. Policy PP-3.12 Fire protection and emergency medical resource allocation

      We use fire and emergency services data analysis and professional expertise to allocate resources, reduce fire risks, and improve emergency response.

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    29. Policy PP-3.13 Periodic needs assessment

      We periodically assess our facility, equipment, and staffing needs and use the assessment to allocate funding resources in the annual budget and capital improvement program.

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    30. Policy PP-3.14 Qualified workforce

      We attract and retain a qualified workforce of fire fighters, emergency medical technicians, and support personnel, and invest in training and ongoing education.

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    31. Policy PP-4.1 Emergency management plans

      A reduced risk of and impact from injury, loss of life, property damage, and economic and social disruption resulting from emergencies, natural disasters, and potential changes in climate.

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    32. Policy PP-4.2 Critical and essential facility operation

      We ensure that critical and essential County facilities remain operational during emergencies.

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    33. Policy PP-4.3 Automatic and mutual aid

      We participate in agreements for automatic and mutual aid with other local, state, federal, and nongovernmental emergency service providers to improve protection services and emergency response throughout the county.

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    34. Policy PP-4.4 Emergency shelters and routes

      We identify and publicize emergency shelters and sign and control evacuation routes for use during emergencies.

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    35. Policy PP-4.5 Vulnerable populations

      We coordinate with and encourage the use of community-based networks to aid vulnerable populations prepare for emergencies and provide assistance with evacuation and recovery.

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    36. Policy PP-4.6 Recovery

      We reestablish and expedite County services to assist affected residents and businesses in the short- and long-term recovery from emergencies and natural disasters.

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    37. Policy PP-4.7 Public outreach and education

      We engage with the community to increase awareness of and preparedness for emergencies and natural disasters.

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    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps PP1(A-C) Critical Facilities (PDF | WEB)
    2. Policy Maps PP-2 Evacuation Routes (PDF | WEB)
    3. Policy Maps PP-3 Sheriff Operations (PDF | WEB)
  • Goals
    1. GOAL NR-1 AIR QUALITY

      Air quality that promotes health and wellness of residents in San Bernardino County through improvements in locally-generated emissions

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    2. Goal NR-2 Water Quality

      Clean and safe water for human consumption and the natural environment

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    3. Goal NR-3 Open Space, Parks, and Recreation

      A system of well-planned and maintained parks, trails, and open space that provides recreation opportunities for residents, attracts visitors from across the region and around the country, and preserves the natural environment.

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    4. Goal NR-4 Scenic Resources

      Scenic resources that highlight the natural environment and reinforce the identity of local communities and the county

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    5. Goal NR-5 Biological Resources

      An interconnected landscape of open spaces and habitat areas that promotes biodiversity and healthy ecosystems, both for their intrinsic value and for the value placed on them by residents and visitors.

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    6. Goal NR-6 Mineral Resources

      Mineral resource zones that allow extraction industries to continue supporting the regional and national economy while minimizing negative impacts on the public and natural environment

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    7. Goal NR-7 Agriculture and Soils

      The ability of property owners, farmers, and ranchers to conduct sustainable and economically viable agricultural operations

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    Policies
    1. Policy NR-1.1 Land use

      We promote compact and transit-oriented development countywide and regulate the types and locations of development in unincorporated areas to minimize vehicle miles traveled and greenhouse gas emissions.

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    2. Policy NR-1.2 Indoor air quality

      We promote the improvement of indoor air quality through the California Building and Energy Codes and through the provision of public health programs and services.

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    3. Policy NR-1.3 Coordination on air pollution

      We collaborate with air quality management districts and other local agencies to monitor and reduce major pollutants affecting the county at the emission source.

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    4. Policy NR-1.4 Military coordination on air quality

      We collaborate with the military to avoid or minimize impacts on military training and operations from air pollution and haze.

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    5. Policy NR-1.5 Sensitive land uses

      We consider recommendations from the California Air Resources Board on the siting of new sensitive land uses and exposure to specific source categories.

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    6. Policy NR-1.6 Fugitive dust emissions

      We coordinate with air quality management districts on requirements for dust control plans, revegetation, and soil compaction to prevent fugitive dust emissions.

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    7. Policy NR-1.7 Greenhouse gas reduction targets

      We strive to meet the 2040 and 2050 greenhouse gas emission reduction targets in accordance with state law.

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    8. Policy NR-1.8 Construction and operations

      We invest in County facilities and fleet vehicles to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions. We encourage County contractors and other builders and developers to use low-emission construction vehicles and equipment to improve air quality and reduce emissions.

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    9. Policy NR-1.9 Building design and upgrades

      We use the CALGreen Code to meet energy efficiency standards for new buildings and encourage the upgrading of existing buildings to incorporate design elements, building materials, and fixtures that improve environmental sustainability and reduce emissions.

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    10. Policy NR-2.1 Coordination on water quality

      We collaborate with the state, regional water quality control boards, watermasters, water purveyors, and government agencies at all levels to ensure a safe supply of drinking water and a healthy environment.

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    11. Policy NR-2.2 Water management plans

      We support the development, update, and implementation of ground and surface water quality management plans emphasizing the protection of water quality from point and non-point source pollution.

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    12. Policy NR-2.3 Military oordination on water quality

      We collaborate with the military to avoid or minimize impacts on military training and operations from groundwater contamination and inadequate groundwater supply.

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    13. Policy NR-2.4 Wastewater discharge

      We apply federal and state water quality standards for wastewater discharge requirements in the review of development proposals that relate to type, location, and size of the proposed project in order to safeguard public health and shared water resources.

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    14. Policy NR-2.5 Stormwater discharge

      We ensure compliance with the County’s Municipal Stormwater NPDES (National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) Permit by requiring new development and significant redevelopment to protect the quality of water and drainage systems through site design, source controls, stormwater treatment, runoff reduction measures, best management practices, low impact development strategies, and technological advances. For existing development, we monitor businesses and coordinate with municipalities.

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    15. Policy NR-2.6 Agricultural waste and biosolids

      We coordinate with regional water quality control boards and other responsible agencies to regulate and control animal waste and biosolids in order to protect groundwater and the natural environment.

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    16. Policy NR-3.1 Open space preservation

      We regulate land use and coordinate with public and nongovernmental agencies to preserve open space areas that protect natural resources, function as a buffer against natural hazards or between land uses, serve as a recreation or tourist destination, or are central to the identity of an unincorporated community.

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    17. Policy NR-3.2 Residential clustering

      We allow residential development to cluster housing units in order to reduce the consumption of undeveloped land, maximize the amount of open space, preserve natural resources, conform to natural topography/grade, and/or reduce exposure of structures to natural hazards.

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    18. Policy NR-3.3 Management of designated areas

      We coordinate with public and nongovernmental agencies to sustainably manage and conserve land within or adjacent to locally-, state-, or federally-designated open space or resource conservation areas.

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    19. Policy NR-3.4 Land exchange

      We coordinate with state and federal agencies to exchange publicly owned lands in order to provide additional areas for open space, recreation, and resource protection. We also request the right of first refusal on publicly owned lands made available for purchase to the public.

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    20. Policy NR-3.5 Private conservation efforts

      We support nongovernmental organizations and private entities who purchase, own, maintain, and expand areas for conservation and preservation. We also support the voluntary transition of privately held lands within a larger boundary designated by the state or federal government for open space and resource conservation to public ownership.

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    21. Policy NR-3.6 Regional park land

      We coordinate with other jurisdictions and agencies to provide regional park land. We prioritize the maintenance and improvement of existing County parks and trails over their expansion or creation of new facilities.

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    22. Policy NR-3.7 Regional park revenue

      We generate revenues from County-owned parks and facilities to offset the costs of operation and maintenance. We may also coordinate with local jurisdictions and leverage other resources to support the maintenance and improvement of park and trail facilities.

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    23. Policy NR-3.8 Regional trail system

      We coordinate with incorporated jurisdictions, state and federal agencies, and other regional and not-for-profit entities to maintain and improve a regional trail system. We prioritize the maintenance and improvement of the Santa Ana River Trail, followed by the creation of trails in unincorporated areas that connect to existing trails in incorporated areas and to state- and federally-maintained trails.

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    24. Policy NR-3.9 Local parks, trails, and recreation

      We support the provision of local and community parks, trails, and recreational programs and facilities in unincorporated areas when a locally-approved funding and financing mechanism is established to pay for acquisition, construction, maintenance, and operations. We encourage unincorporated communities to apply for funding and cooperate with them in their funding applications for local trails that are identified in a non-motorized transportation plan that is accepted or adopted by the County. We also encourage, where feasible, local trails to be separated from vehicular traffic to improve the safety of trail users.

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    25. Policy NR-3.10 Joint use facilities

      We promote the creation of joint use facilities for local parks and recreation programs through coordination with the County Flood Control District, local school districts, utilities, and other public agencies.

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    26. Policy NR-3.11 Off-highway vehicle areas

      In areas under the County’s land use authority, we require new or expansion of existing commercial off-highway vehicle (OHV) areas to be situated and buffered to minimize effects on nearby residential uses, military activity, and environmentally sensitive areas.

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    27. Policy NR-3.12 Rights-of-way and easements

      We consider reserving portions of rights-of-way and easements found to be unnecessary for the ultimate buildout of roadways or flood control facilities for use as local pedestrian, bicycle, and/or equestrian trails.

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    28. Policy NR-4.1 Preservation of scenic resources

      We consider the location and scale of development to preserve regionally significant scenic vistas and natural features, including prominent hillsides, ridgelines, dominant landforms, and reservoirs.

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    29. Policy NR-4.2 Coordination with agencies

      We coordinate with adjacent federal, state, local, and tribal agencies to protect scenic resources that extend beyond the County’s land use authority and are important to countywide residents, businesses, and tourists.

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    30. Policy NR-4.3 Off-site signage

      We prohibit new off-site signage and encourage the removal of existing off-site signage along or within view of County Scenic Routes and State Scenic Highways.

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    31. Policy NR-5.1 Coordinated habitat planning

      We participate in landscape-scale habitat conservation planning and coordinate with existing or proposed habitat conservation and natural resource management plans for private and public lands to increase certainty for both the conservation of species, habitats, wildlife corridors, and other important biological resources and functions; and for land development and infrastructure permitting.

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    32. Policy NR-5.2 Capacity for resource protection and management

      We coordinate with public and nongovernmental agencies to seek funding and other resources to protect, restore, and maintain open space, habitat, and wildlife corridors for threatened, endangered, and other sensitive species.

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    33. Policy NR-5.3 Multiple-resource benefits

      We prioritize conservation actions that demonstrate multiple resource preservation benefits, such as biology, climate change adaptation and resiliency, hydrology, cultural, scenic, and community character.

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    34. Policy NR-5.4 Off-base recovery efforts

      We coordinate with military installations to facilitate off-base recovery of threatened and endangered species and landscape-scale conservation.

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    35. Policy NR-5.5 Mitigation and future responsibilities

      We require that new development satisfy habitat conservation responsibilities without shifting conservation responsibilities onto military property.

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    36. Policy NR-5.6 Mitigation banking

      We support the proactive assemblage of lands to protect biological resources and facilitate development through private or public mitigation banking. We require public and private conservation lands or mitigation banks to ensure that easement and fee title agreements provide funding methods sufficient to manage the land in perpetuity.

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    37. Policy NR-5.7 Development review, entitlement, and mitigation

      We comply with state and federal regulations regarding protected species of animals and vegetation through the development review, entitlement, and environmental clearance processes.

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    38. Policy NR-5.8 Invasive species

      We require the use of non-invasive plant species with new development and encourage the management of existing invasive plant species that degrade ecological function.

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    39. Policy NR-6.1 Mineral resource areas

      We prioritize the conservation of land area with mineral resources by prohibiting or discouraging development of land that would substantially preclude the future development of mining facilities in areas classified as Mineral Resource Zone (MRZ) 2a, 2b, or 3a.

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    40. Policy NR-6.2 Mining operations and reclamation

      We require and monitor mineral extraction activities to ensure that the operation and reclamation of mined lands is consistent with the State Surface Mining and Reclamation Act of 1975 (SMARA).

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    41. Policy NR-6.3 Conservation of construction aggregate

      We encourage the continued operation of existing mining facilities and streamline the permitting of new mining facilities (consistent with the Policy Plan and other local, state, and federal regulations) to establish aggregate resources that are sufficient to satisfy 50 years of county demand.

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    42. Policy NR-7.1 Protection of agricultural land

      We protect economically viable and productive agricultural lands from the adverse effects of urban encroachment, particularly increased erosion and sedimentation, trespass, and non-agricultural land development.

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    43. Policy NR-7.2 Preservation of important farmlands

      We require project applicants seeking to develop 20 or more acres of farmland (classified as prime, of statewide importance, or unique farmland) to non-agricultural uses to prepare an agricultural resource evaluation prior to project approval. The evaluation shall use generally accepted methodologies to identify the potentially significant impact of the loss of agricultural land as well as the economic viability and sustainability of future agricultural use of the property, including long-term sustainability and economic viability of water resources. If the conversion is deemed significant, the County shall require mitigation at a 1:1 ratio of converted to preserved acreage through conservation easements, payment of its valuation equivalent if a fee mitigation program is established, or inclusion in a regional agricultural preservation program.

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    44. Policy NR-7.3 Conservation and preservation incentives

      We support programs and policies that provide tax and economic incentives to conserve existing productive agricultural lands or preserve farmland classified as prime, of statewide importance, unique, or of local importance. We support land owners in establishing new and maintaining existing California Land Conservation (Williamson Act) contracts.

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    45. Policy NR-7.4 Economic diversity of farm operations

      We encourage farm operations to strengthen their economic viability through diversifying potential sources of farm income and activity, including value added products, agricultural tourism, roadside stands, organic farming, and farmers markets.

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    46. Policy NR-7.6 Sustainable grazing practices

      We require all grazing on open rangelands to be compatible with the conservation of threatened and endangered species.

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    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps NR-1 Air Districts & Basins (PDF | WEB)
    2. Policy Maps NR-2 Parks and Open Space Resources (PDF | WEB)
    3. Policy Maps NR-3 Scenic Routes & Highways (PDF | WEB)
    4. Policy Maps NR-4 Mineral Resources Zones (PDF | WEB)
    5. Policy Maps NR-5 Agricultural Resources (PDF | WEB)
  • Goals
    1. Goal RE-1 Energy Conservation and Efficiency

      The County will pursue energy efficiency tools and conservation practices that optimize the benefits of renewable energy

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    2. Goal RE-2 Renewable Energy Systems

      The County will be home to diverse and innovative renewable energy systems that provide reliable and affordable energy to our unique Valley, Mountain, and Desert regions

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    3. Goal RE-3 Community-Oriented Renewable Energy

      Community-oriented renewable energy facilities will be prioritized to complement local values and support a high quality of life in unincorporated communities

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    4. Goal RE-4 Environmental Compatibility

      The County will establish a new era of sustainable energy production and consumption in the context of sound resource conservation and renewable energy development practices that reduce greenhouse gases and dependency on fossil fuels

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    5. Goal RE-5 Siting

      Renewable energy facilities will be located in areas that meet County standards, local values, community needs and environmental and cultural resource protection priorities

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    6. Goal RE-6 County Government Systems

      County regulatory systems will ensure that renewable energy facilities are designed, sited, developed, operated and decommissioned in ways compatible with our communities, natural environment, and applicable environmental and cultural resource protection laws

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    Policies
    1. Policy RE-1.1

      Continue implementing the energy conservation and efficiency measures identified in the County of San Bernardino Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Plan.

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    2. Policy RE-1.2

      Optimize energy efficiency in the built environment

      • RE 1.2.1: Support low- to no-cost retrofits to improve energy efficiency of existing homes through grant and loan programs.
      • RE 1.2.2: Encourage property owners to participate in a PACE program for access to energy efficiency retrofit financing.
      • RE 1.2.3: Encourage utilities to expand free to low-cost audit and retrofit programs in the built environments.
      • RE 1.2.4: Work with utilities (Southern California Edison (SCE), Southern California Gas Company (SCG), etc.) to identify retrofit opportunities with short payback periods, such as variable-speed pool pumps, building air sealing, and attic insulation, for County use in conducting focused energy efficiency outreach.
      • RE 1.2.5: Collaborate with community partners to promote the benefits of energy efficiency to County residents, businesses, and industries.
      • RE 1.2.6: Encourage new development to comply with the optional energy efficiency measures of the CALGreen Code.
      • RE 1.2.7: Encourage passive solar design in subdivision and design review processes.
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    3. Policy RE-1.3

      Promote the local economic benefits of energy efficiency retrofits.

      • RE 1.3.1: Support workforce development and certification for green trades.
      • RE 1.3.2: Provide networking opportunities to connect local contractors with energy efficiency retrofit programs such as the PACE program and Energy Upgrade California.
      • RE 1.3.3: Encourage energy efficiency retrofit projects as components of adaptive re-use of historic structures.
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    4. Policy RE-1.4

      Encourage residents and businesses to conserve energy.

      • RE 1.4.1: Collaborate with utilities to support and learn from annual energy benchmarking reports that large energy users are conducting pursuant to AB 1103.
      • RE 1.4.2: Collaborate with the CEC, utilities, and local partners to launch online energy tracking competitions.
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    5. Policy RE-2.1

      Support solar energy generation, solar water heating, wind energy and bioenergy systems that are consistent with the orientation, siting and environmental compatibility policies of the General Plan

      • RE 2.1.1: Utilize renewable energy development standards in the Development Code to minimize impacts on surrounding properties.
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    6. Policy RE-2.2

      Promote use of energy storage technologies that are appropriate for the character of the proposed location.

      • RE 2.2.1: Encourage onsite energy storage with RE generation facilities, consistent with County Development Code requirements.
      • RE 2.2.2: Encourage and allow energy storage facilities as an accessory component of RE generation facilities.
      • RE 2.2.3: Establish thresholds for conditions under which energy storage facilities are a primary use and subject to separate permit processes.
      • RE 2.2.4: Periodically review and encourage appropriate technology types for energy storage facilities.
      • RE 2.2.5: Support state policies and efforts by utility companies to plan for and develop energy storage technologies through legislative advocacy and coordination with utility companies.
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    7. Policy RE-2.3

      Encourage the use of feasible emerging and experimental renewable energy technologies that are compatible with County regulatory standards.

      • RE 2.3.1: Monitor emerging renewable energy technologies and amend County development standards as needed to accommodate suitable new technology types.
      • RE 2.3.2: Monitor improvements in existing renewable energy technologies, and consider allowing additional types of renewable energy facilities as they become compatible with County regulatory standards.
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    8. Policy RE-2.4

      Identify and prioritize programs that support cost-effective and universal access to renewable energy.

      • RE 2.4.1: Expand outreach and education efforts through the County’s online Community Development Toolkit on programs such as the availability of federal and state tax credits,
      • participation in the a PACE program, and other mechanisms to reduce the cost of renewable energy facilities for onsite use on new and existing buildings.
      • RE 2.4.2: Educate developers about the County’s RE goals and policies, and encourage the inclusion of renewable energy facilities for onsite use in new developments.
      • RE 2.4.3: Engage with residential developers to discuss and identify opportunities and incentives to expand onsite renewable energy facilities consistent with the goals and policies of this Element.
      • RE 2.4.4: Encourage installation of renewable energy systems on rental properties, multi-family buildings, and buildings with multiple commercial tenants by working with property developers and owners, using tools such as green leases, split incentive programs, and the California Solar Initiative’s MASH program.
      • RE 2.4.5: Encourage the pursuit of community choice aggregation programs in collaboration with other interested jurisdictions in the region.
      • RE 2.4.6: Proactively coordinate RE programs with other jurisdictions in the County to promote countywide collaboration and consistency.
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    9. Policy RE-2.5

      Support renewable energy systems that accelerate zero net energy (ZNE) through innovative design, construction, and operations of residences, businesses, and institutions that are grid-neutral and independent of centralized energy infrastructure.

      • RE 2.5.1: Allow and encourage construction of new buildings designed to ZNE standards consistent with state programs.
      • RE 2.5.2: Incorporate ZNE into outreach and educational strategies about renewable energy and energy efficiency.
      • RE 2.5.3: Allow and encourage construction of new buildings or developments in remote locations with stand-alone energy systems not connected to the grid.
      • RE 2.5.4: Encourage energy independence and resiliency, including zero net energy and stand-alone systems not connected to the grid, in County economic development presentations and outreach efforts.
      • RE 2.5.5: Collaborate with incorporated cities and other jurisdictions to create region-specific ZNE programs and Community Development toolkit tools tailored to the climates and characteristics of each region to provide consistency and leverage resources.
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    10. Policy RE-2.6

      Encourage energy efficiency through appropriate renewable energy systems.

      • RE 2.6.1: Pursue and consider development incentives such as density bonuses and streamlined permitting for projects that install accessory renewable energy facilities.
      • RE 2.6.2: Allow developers of nonresidential properties to reduce required on-site parking spaces below minimum standards when space equivalent to the parking space reduction is devoted to renewable energy generation and storage facilities designed to serve onsite energy needs.
      • RE 2.6.3: Encourage solar energy generation on rooftops and on covered parking as the first priority for on-site energy generation.
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    11. Policy RE-3.1

      Prioritize, facilitate, and encourage onsite accessory RE generation to serve the unincorporated county, with a primary focus on rooftop and parking lot solar energy generation.

      • RE 3.1.1: Permit rooftop, parking lot, and similar accessory RE generation facilities that primarily serve on-site energy needs in all zoning districts, including micro-grid systems, with minimal regulation and permitting requirements.
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    12. Policy RE-3.2

      Encourage community-oriented renewable energy (CORE) generation that primarily serves local uses in the county.

      • RE 3.2.1: Specific standards shall be established and maintained for community-oriented RE generation facilities appropriate to the Valley, Desert, and Mountain regions.
      • RE 3.2.2: Encourage through the regulatory system the establishment of local and regional organizations to pursue community-oriented RE production and storage.
      • RE 3.2.3: CORE facilities shall be designed primarily to meet the needs of the local users, with an adequate overage margin to meet peak demands and defray the cost of the systems.
      • RE 3.2.3: Encourage utilities and developers to establish community-shared solar programs that allow residents and businesses to purchase shares of the output of RE generation facilities to offset their electricity bills.
      • RE 3.2.4: Provide information and educational opportunities in the Countywide Plan Community Development Tool Kit for local organizations pursuing the acquisition of Community-Oriented Renewable Energy (CORE).
      • RE 3.2.5: Encourage utilization of micro-grid technologies to support the principle of “local production primarily for local consumption,” to enhance local energy security and to improve local costs of living and commerce.
      • RE 3.2.6: Apply minimal discretion in the permit approval process for CORE facilities.
      • RE 3.2.7: Encourage infrastructure, net metering and regulatory systems that support CORE facilities.
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    13. Policy RE-3.3

      Promote an adaptive distributed energy infrastructure that sustains local communities and improves resiliency to grid failures and increasing energy prices.

      • RE 3.3.1: Support research, planning and investment in accessory and community-oriented energy generation, distribution, and storage infrastructure by adapting regulatory tools to respond to rapidly evolving RE technologies.
      • RE 3.3.2: Encourage new institutional campuses and large residential/commercial developments to include micro-grids with onsite renewable energy generation and energy storage systems.
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    14. Policy RE-3.4

      Require renewable energy facilities developed in spheres of influence of incorporated cities to be compatible and consistent with standards of the sphere cities.

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    15. Policy RE-3.5

      Incorporate resident, business owner, and stakeholder input into the development and implementation of County policies for renewable energy.

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    16. Policy RE-3.6

      Encourage renewable energy facilities to meet community goals, including supporting community health, wellness, and recreational needs.

      • RE 3.6.1: Include opportunities to incorporate public art and encourage design features that provide screening in renewable energy facilities on public spaces, nonresidential facilities, and multi-family buildings.
      • RE 3.6.2: Encourage the use of renewable energy facilities as shade structures in parks and community centers, and over parking lots and parking structures.
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    17. Policy RE-3.7

      Continue to foster local economic benefits of renewable energy facilities through community involvement.

      • RE 3.7.1: Require CORE project development applications to be sponsored or co-sponsored by local users who will be the primary consumers of the energy generated by the projects.
      • RE 3.7.2: Encourage RE generation facility developers to give preference to San Bernardino County residents in hiring for construction, operation, and decommissioning of the facility.
      • RE 3.7.3: Encourage local community colleges, vocational schools, and workforce training centers to offer programs on renewable energy installation and maintenance.
      • RE 3.7.4: Encourage innovation zones for manufacturers to locate and operate in the unincorporated county to research, construct, test, and distribute renewable energy technologies
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    18. Policy RE-4.1

      Apply standards to the design, siting, and operation of all renewable energy facilities that protect the environment, including sensitive biological resources, air quality, water supply and quality, cultural, archaeological, paleontological and scenic resources.

      • RE 4 .1.1: Consult with Native American tribes in the identification, evaluation, and treatment of cultural resources and in the preparation and implementation of measures required to identify, evaluate, protect, and manage cultural resources.
      • RE 4.1.2: RE development applications shall be subject to thorough environmental review, including consideration of water consumption, before being permitted.
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    19. Policy RE-4.2

      Ensure that renewable energy facilities do not disrupt, degrade, or alter the local hydrology and hydrogeology.

      • RE 4.2.1: Require a groundwater impact assessment that evaluates the short and long-term impacts to groundwater usage.
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    20. Policy RE-4.3

      Require construction and operation of all renewable energy facilities to minimize negative effects and optimize benefits to unincorporated communities.

      • RE 4.3.1: Define measures required to minimize ground disturbance, soil erosion, flooding, and blowing of sand and dust, with appropriate enforcement mechanisms in the Development Code.
      • RE 4.3.2: Require operators to track and report energy production and other benefits cited in a project proposal, in addition to tracking efforts to avoid and minimize negative impacts.
      • RE 4.3.3: Give preference to the utilization of existing infrastructure to minimize the need for additional transmission development.
      • RE 4.3.4: Establish inspection protocols and programs to ensure that RE facilities are constructed, operated, and eventually decommissioned consistent with the requirements of the San Bernardino County Code, and in a manner that will not be detrimental to the public health, safety, or welfare.
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    21. Policy RE-4.4

      Encourage siting, construction and screening of RE generation facilities to avoid, minimize or mitigate significant changes to the visual environment including minimizing light and glare.

      • RE 4.4.1: Reduce visual impacts through a combination of minimized reflective surfaces, context sensitive color treatments, nature-oriented geometry, minimized vegetation clearing under and around arrays, conservation of pre-existing native plants, replanting of native plants as appropriate, maintenance of natural landscapes around the edges of facility complexes, and lighting design to minimize night-sky impacts, including attraction of and impact to nocturnal migratory birds
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    22. Policy RE-4.5

      Require RE generation facility developers to provide and implement a decommissioning plan that provides for reclamation of the site to a condition at least as good as that which existed before the lands were disturbed or another appropriate end use that is stable (i.e. with interim vegetative cover), prevents nuisance, and is readily adaptable for alternative land uses. Decommissioning plans shall:

      • RE 4.5.1: Include a cost estimate of the decommissioning and site restoration work for the purpose of providing a bond to guarantee completion of decommissioning.
      • RE 4.5.2: Provide for an inspection after all decommissioning and site restoration work to ensure that the work has been completed to the standards required by the County, prior to release of the decommissioning bond.
      • RE 4.5.3: Require any structures created during construction to be decommissioned and all material recycled to the greatest extent possible.
      • RE 4.5.4: Require all material recovered during decommissioning and site restoration work of a renewable energy facility, including the renewable energy technology itself, to be reused or recycled to the greatest extent possible.
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    23. Policy RE-4.6

      Require all recyclable electronic and/or toxic materials to be recycled in accordance with the requirements of the Basel Convention or comparable standard.

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    24. Policy RE-4.7

      RE project site selection and site design shall be guided by the following priorities relative to habitat conservation and mitigation:

      1. Avoid sensitive habitat, including wildlife corridors, during site selection and project design.
      2. Where necessary and feasible, conduct mitigation on-site.
      3. When on-site habitat mitigation is not possible or adequate, establish mitigation off-site in an area designated for habitat conservation.
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    25. Policy RE-4.8

      Encourage mitigation for RE generation facility projects to locate habitat conservation offsets on public lands where suitable habitat is available.

      • RE 4.8.1: Collaborate with appropriate state and federal agencies to facilitate mitigation/habitat conservation activities on public lands
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    26. Policy RE-4.9

      Encourage RE facility developers to design projects in ways that provide sanctuary (i.e., a safe place to nest, breed and/or feed) for native bees, butterflies and birds where feasible and appropriate, according to expert recommendations.

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    27. Policy RE-4.10

      Prohibit utility-oriented RE project development on sites that would create adverse impacts on the quality of life or economic development opportunities in existing unincorporated communities.

      • RE 4.10.1: Prohibit development of utility-oriented RE projects in the Rural Living land use districts throughout the County.
      • RE 4.10.2: Prohibit development of utility-oriented RE projects within the boundaries of existing community plans, which at the time of adoption of this Element are the Bloomington, Muscoy, Bear Valley, Crest Forest, Hilltop, Lake Arrowhead, Lytle Creek, Oak Glen, Homestead Valley, Joshua Tree, Lucerne Valley, Morongo Valley, Oak Hills and Phelan/Pinon Hills Community Plans.
      • RE 4.10.3: Establish exclusion areas in the Development Code regulations for renewable energy development, beginning with the prohibitions in Policies 4.10.1 and 4.10.2 and provide for additional exclusion areas, such as new community plan areas, to be designated by amendment to the Development Code.
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    28. Policy RE-5.1

      Encourage the siting of RE generation facilities on disturbed or degraded sites in proximity to necessary transmission infrastructure.

      • RE 5.1.1: Community-oriented RE generation facility sites may be less disturbed or degraded, but should contribute direct benefits to the communities they are intended to serve.
      • RE 5.1.2: Siting of community-oriented and utility-oriented RE generation facilities will conform to applicable standards set forth in the Development Code.
      • RE 5.1.3: Encourage new subdivision applications to set aside an area of land capable of supporting neighborhood-oriented renewable energy generation.
      • RE 5.1.4: Encourage micro-grids supported by energy storage and innovative technologies for incorporation into neighborhood- and community-scale renewable energy projects.
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    29. Policy RE-5.2

      Utility- oriented RE generation projects on private land in the unincorporated County will be limited to the site-type below, in addition to meeting criteria established herein and in the Development Code:

      i. Private lands adjacent to the federal Development Focus Areas supported by the Board of Supervisors that meet siting criteria and development standards
      ii. Waste Disposal Sites
      iii. Mining Sites (operating and reclaimed)
      iv. Fallow, degraded and unviable agricultural lands
      v. Airports (existing and abandoned or adaptively re-used)
      vi. Brownfields
      vii. California Department of Toxic Substance Control Cleanup Program Sites
      viii. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Sites
      ix. Sites within or adjacent to electric transmission and utility distribution corridors
      x. Existing energy generation sites
      xi. Industrial zones proven to not conflict with economic development needs
      xii. Other sites proven by a detailed suitability analysis to reflect the significantly disturbed nature or conditions of those listed above

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    30. Policy RE-5.3

      Collaborate with utilities and RE generation facility developers to encourage collocation of transmission and intertie facilities.

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    31. Policy RE-5.4

      Utility-oriented RE generation facilities will be required to meet a higher standard of evaluation for appropriate site selection due to its size and distance from population centers.

      • RE 5.4.1: Establish a two-step application process for utility-oriented RE generation that evaluates site selection early in the planning process.
      • RE 5.4.2: Encourage utility-oriented RE generation to occur in the five DRECP Development Focus Areas (DFAs) that were supported by the Board of Supervisors on February 17, 2016, Resolution No. 2016-20 and on adjacent private lands.
      • RE 5.4.3: Direct utility-oriented RE generation facilities that may require transmission upgrades to seek sites within existing transmission corridors.
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    32. Policy RE-5.5

      Coordinate with the Department of Defense on the siting of RE generation facilities in a manner that will not significantly impact military operations in the unincorporated county.

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    33. Policy RE-5.6

      Consult Native American tribes early in the site selection process, with joint evaluation of a Phase 1 Cultural Resources Analysis prior to approval of a site for utility-oriented RE generation.

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    34. Policy RE-5.7

      Support renewable energy projects that are compatible with protection of the scenic and recreational assets that define San Bernardino County for its residents and make it a destination for tourists.

      • RE 5.7.1: Site RE generation facilities in a manner that will avoid, minimize or substantially mitigate adverse impacts to sensitive habitats, cultural resources, surrounding land uses, and scenic viewsheds
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    35. Policy RE-5.8

      Discourage conversion of productive or viable prime agricultural lands to RE generation facilities.

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    36. Policy RE-5.9

      Collaborate with utilities, the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to plan for RE generation facilities to be located on public lands, apart from existing unincorporated communities.

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    37. Policy RE-6.1

      Ensure consistency, clarity, and timeliness in the development permitting process for RE generation facilities.

      • RE 6.1.1: Expedite the permitting process for accessory and community-oriented RE generation facilities
      • RE 6.1.2: Provide public information to facilitate installation of accessory RE generation systems, including rooftop solar PV, solar water heaters, and accessory wind energy systems.
      • RE 6.1.3: Establish Development Code standards for ground-mounted accessory RE generation facilities in residential areas and Rural Living land use designations to address issues of aesthetics, safety, flood risks, wind, and dust.
      • RE 6.1.4: Establish procedures and standards in the Development Code for new RE project applications that clearly identify the environmental review process, design standards, and permit requirements.
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    38. Policy RE-6.2

      Establish mechanisms by which the County can restore and maintain the nexus between costs and benefits in RE development.

      • RE 6.2.1: Work with the federal and state governments that may approve renewable energy projects on public lands, to seek appropriate revenue mechanisms to cover the cost of services provided by the County.
      • RE 6.2.2: Maintain a fee system that adequately covers the County’s costs of providing necessary public services to renewable energy generation facility developers during permitting, development, operations and decommissioning.
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    39. Policy RE-6.3

      Share information and communicate the costs and benefits of investing in energy efficiency retrofits, energy conservation behaviors, and renewable energy systems.

      • RE 6.3.1: Update the County’s renewable energy web portal to include information to publicize successes of community-oriented renewable energy (CORE) projects, sharing lessons learned, and encouraging duplication.
      • RE 6.3.2: Participate in regional collaborative efforts such as the Countywide Vision working groups to identify, vet, and implement energy programs that are feasible at the regional scale but may not be feasible for one jurisdiction to implement independently, such as energy partnerships with utilities or regional education programs.
      • RE 6.3.3: Promote opportunities for low-cost property financing for energy efficiency and onsite accessory RE generation through efforts, such as the PACE program, at County events and during the review of building permits and applications for building expansion or renovation.
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    40. Policy RE-6.4

      Support the governor’s initiative to obtain 50% of the energy consumed in the state through RE generation sources by 2040.

      • RE 6.4.1: Continue to implement policies and strategies for energy conservation by the County in the Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Plan, including capture and use of landfill gas, installation of renewable energy systems and use of alternative fuels.
      • RE 6.4.2: Consider options for entering into an energy services contract or power purchase agreement for expanding the renewable energy that serves County facilities while reducing the County’s overall utility costs.
      • RE 6.4.3: Consider utilizing public/private partnerships to install onsite solar energy on County government facilities, sharing costs and benefits.
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    41. Policy RE-6.5

      Encourage pilot projects to demonstrate energy efficiency retrofit investments and renewable energy opportunities.

      • RE 6.5.1: Where feasible, install renewable energy projects on County facilities that provide visible, public examples of the County’s commitment to cost-effective renewable energy.
      • RE 6.5.2: Consider utilizing County lands or facilities for research and development or university exploration of new renewable energy technologies that seek to minimize adverse effects to the environment.
      • RE 6.5.3: Encourage development of a highly visible private property pilot project for the small-scale use of distributed renewable energy, such as projects at local tourist-serving uses.
      • RE 6.5.4: Identify opportunities to create revenue for the County by leasing the rights to renewable energy resources on County property for distributed energy storage or distributed generation through power purchase agreements or similar arrangements.
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    42. Policy RE-6.6

      Investigate new RE generation incentive programs, such as Community Choice Aggregation, for their appropriateness to our communities.

      • RE 6.6.1: Promote incentives available to County residents and businesses for solar photovoltaic, solar water heating, wind energy, and bioenergy installations. Incentives may be offered by the County, federal agencies, other local and regional agencies, or private partners.
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    43. Policy RE-6.7

      Induce high volume energy users to develop onsite RE generation systems through streamlining of permit requirements.

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  • Goals
    1. Goal CR-1 Tribal Cultural Resources

      Tribal cultural resources that are preserved and celebrated out of respect for Native American beliefs and traditions

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    2. Goal CR-2 Historic and Paleontological Resources

      Historic resources (buildings, structures, or archaeological resources) and paleontological resources that are protected and preserved for their cultural importance to local communities as well as their research and educational potential.

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    Policies
    1. Policy CR-1.1 Tribal notification and coordination

      We notify and coordinate with tribal representatives in accordance with state and federal laws to strengthen our working relationship with area tribes, avoid inadvertent discoveries of Native American archaeological sites and burials, assist with the treatment and disposition of inadvertent discoveries, and explore options of avoidance of cultural resources early in the planning process.

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    2. Policy CR-1.2 Tribal planning

      We will collaborate with local tribes on countywide planning efforts and, as permitted or required, planning efforts initiated by local tribes.

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    3. Policy CR-1.3 Mitigation and avoidance

      We consult with local tribes to establish appropriate project-specific mitigation measures and resource-specific treatment of potential cultural resources. We require project applicants to design projects to avoid known tribal cultural resources, whenever possible. If avoidance is not possible, we require appropriate mitigation to minimize project impacts on tribal cultural resources.

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    4. Policy CR-1.4 Resource monitoring

      We encourage active participation by local tribes as monitors in surveys, testing, excavation, and grading phases of development projects with potential impacts on tribal resources.

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    5. Policy CR-2.1 National and state historic resources

      We encourage the preservation of archaeological sites and structures of state or national significance in accordance with the Secretary of Interior’s standards.

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    6. Policy CR-2.2 Local historic resources

      We encourage property owners to maintain the historic integrity of resources on their property by (listed in order of preference): preservation, adaptive reuse, or memorialization.

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    7. Policy CR-2.3 Paleontological and archaeological resources

      We strive to protect paleontological and archaeological resources from loss or destruction by requiring that new development include appropriate mitigation to preserve the quality and integrity of these resources. We require new development to avoid paleontological and archeological resources whenever possible. If avoidance is not possible, we require the salvage and preservation of paleontological and archeological resources.

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    8. Policy CR-2.4 Partnerships

      We encourage partnerships to champion and financially support the preservation and restoration of historic sites, structures, and districts.

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    9. Policy CR-2.5 Public awareness and education

      We increase public awareness and conduct education efforts about the unique historic, natural, tribal, and cultural resources in San Bernardino County through the County Museum and in collaboration with other entities.

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  • Goals
    1. Goal ED-1 Unincorporated Land and Facilities

      Increased business investment in land and facilities and job growth in key unincorporated areas.

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    2. Goal ED-2 Labor Force

      A skilled and educated labor force that helps businesses compete in the regional and global economy

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    3. Goal ED-3 Countywide Business and Employment Growth

      Growth of new businesses, improved profitability of existing businesses, and an increased number and quality of jobs in the county.

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    Policies
    1. Policy ED-1.1 Marketing focus areas

      In unincorporated areas, we actively market sites for business park and industrial development in employment focus areas, and we actively market sites for retail and commercial businesses in commercial focus areas.

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    2. Policy ED-1.2 Infrastructure improvements

      We support and facilitate the establishment of special funding and financing mechanisms for road, water, sewer, and drainage infrastructure improvements in order to generate private investment in employment and commercial focus areas.

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    3. Policy ED-1.3 Site aggregation

      We may assist in aggregating smaller lots and parcels to create more marketable and developable sites in employment focus areas.

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    4. Policy ED-1.4 Planned business park and industrial areas

      We prefer master planned approaches through specific and area plans for business park and industrial development and redevelopment. We facilitate master planned approaches in order to discourage incremental general plan amendments that introduce or expand business park or industrial development.

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    5. Policy ED-1.5 Mineral resources

      We support the extraction of mineral resources in unincorporated areas and the establishment and operation of supporting businesses throughout the county.

      GO TO POLICY
    6. Policy ED-1.6 Industrial redevelopment

      We facilitate and promote redevelopment in the industrial redevelopment focus areas to provide land and facilities for non-mining industrial development.

      GO TO POLICY
    7. Policy ED-2.1 Education pathways

      We collaborate with school systems and civic organizations to support countywide education pathways (P-14) to prepare students for jobs in high-skill, high-wage careers and/or to prepare for college.

      GO TO POLICY
    8. Policy ED-2.2 English proficiency

      We support local and countywide programs that improve adult proficiency in the English language.

      GO TO POLICY
    9. Policy ED-2.3 Industry-driven workforce training

      We support countywide education and workforce training programs with a demonstrated ability to expand skills and improve employment opportunities, and we also promote innovative approaches that address the diversity of education, job skills, geography, and socioeconomics of the countywide labor force.

      GO TO POLICY
    10. Policy ED-2.4 Business engagement

      We engage with businesses throughout the county to identify current and future skill and education needs. We assist businesses with recruitment, hiring, on-the-job training, and short-term training needs.

      GO TO POLICY
    11. Policy ED-2.5 Individual assistance

      We provide job search and application assistance to residents countywide, and we provide training and education assistance to eligible individuals.

      GO TO POLICY
    12. Policy ED-3.2 Business assistance

      We collaborate with economic development service providers to offer training and other assistance to existing businesses and business startups countywide.

      GO TO POLICY
    13. Policy ED-3.3 Site selection assistance

      We coordinate with agencies, incorporated cities and towns, and service providers to assist existing and prospective businesses in identifying and selecting sites and facilities countywide. We also assist businesses with permitting, licensing, incentives, and other regulatory requirements.

      GO TO POLICY
    14. Policy ED-3.4 Site and facilities inventory

      We collaborate with real estate brokers, developers, municipalities, and building owners to maintain a countywide inventory of available sites and facilities for businesses.

      GO TO POLICY
    15. Policy ED-3.5 Countywide marketing

      We regularly analyze economic and market conditions and trends to identify target economic sectors and actively market sites and facilities countywide to prospective businesses.

      GO TO POLICY
    16. Policy ED-3.6 Countywide tourism

      We coordinate with a variety of partners to promote San Bernardino County as a regional, national, and international tourist destination and collaborate with tourism industry businesses to improve visitor experience.

      GO TO POLICY
    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps ED-1 Commercial, Employment, and Industrial Redevelopment Focus Areas (PDF | WEB)
  • Goals
    1. Goal HW-1 Health and Social Wellness

      Supportive public facilities and services that assist and guide individuals to achieve and sustain self-sufficiency, social stability, and excellent physical and behavioral health and wellness.

      GO TO GOAL
    2. Goal HW-2 Education

      A common culture that values education and lifelong learning and a populace with the education to participate and compete in the global economy.

      GO TO GOAL
    3. Goal HW-3 Community Development

      Assets that contribute to a complete county and healthy neighborhoods and communities

      GO TO GOAL
    Policies
    1. Policy HW-1.1 Coordinated holistic approach

      We invest in a holistic approach to individual health and wellness to improve the continuum of care, providing coordinated services through departments and agencies associated with human services, economic development, law and justice, and housing, as well as other agencies and nongovernmental organizations.

      GO TO POLICY
    2. Policy HW-1.2 Cultural humility and inclusion

      We guide the development and delivery of appropriate health care, health services, and social assistance by recognizing and continuously learning about the diverse values, cultures, languages, and behaviors found throughout the county, especially for those that are underserved or isolated.

      GO TO POLICY
    3. Policy HW-1.3 Monitoring health and social conditions

      We prioritize our resources to address the most pressing needs by continually engaging residents and monitoring health and social conditions, trends, and emerging needs across the county, while complying with federal and state mandates.

      GO TO POLICY
    4. Policy HW-1.4 Funding application coordination

      We coordinate the application for funding resources to maximize the long-term benefit of addressing multiple health and social issues, both within the County organization and between the County and other agencies and organizations.

      GO TO POLICY
    5. Policy HW-1.5 Partnerships and capacity building

      We leverage partnerships with other agencies and organizations to address health and wellness issues, and, as funding allows, assist in building the capacity of service providers and partner organizations to expand their service and effectiveness.

      GO TO POLICY
    6. Policy HW-1.6 Healthy behaviors

      We collaborate with other public agencies, not-for-profit organizations, and private service providers to offer education and training that enable individuals to make better health and wellness choices. We work to remove environmental and social barriers to healthy habits.

      GO TO POLICY
    7. Policy HW-1.7 Upstream issues

      We collaborate with partners to address upstream issues related to the social determinants of health and social stability (e.g., income, education, housing, neighborhood conditions, and job skills), and to reduce the occurrence of and costs associated with responding to acute and chronic conditions, while complying with federal, state, and local mandates.

      GO TO POLICY
    8. Policy HW-1.8 Assistance for veterans

      We invest in services to assist veterans and their families countywide connect with service providers and apply for benefits from federal, state, and local governmental agencies.

      GO TO POLICY
    9. Policy HW-1.9 Homelessness

      We address homelessness by coordinating a comprehensive countywide network of service delivery and by focusing on transitional and permanent supportive housing for the homeless, including the chronically homeless and near-homeless families and individuals.

      GO TO POLICY
    10. Policy HW-1.10 Safety net

      We use state and federal funding to provide a safety net of services that provides temporary, transitional, and ongoing assistance to protect those most vulnerable.

      GO TO POLICY
    11. Policy HW-1.11 Insurance and medical services

      We collaborate with other public agencies, non-profit organizations, and private health and wellness service providers to facilitate residents obtaining medical insurance, vaccines and preventative care, behavioral health, and treatments, through private service providers, County health and wellness facilities, and public programs.

      GO TO POLICY
    12. Policy HW-1.12 Equity

      We monitor and seek to achieve equitable access to County health and social services, with an emphasis on environmental justice focus areas countywide.

      GO TO POLICY
    13. Policy HW-1.13 Health care professional capacity

      We collaborate with other public agencies, non-profit organizations, and private health and wellness service providers to ensure that an adequate number of medical, behavioral, and dental health professionals serve residents countywide, with an emphasis on health care professional shortage areas.

      GO TO POLICY
    14. Policy HW-1.14 Arrowhead Regional Medical Center

      We provide quality general and specialty health care services, operate medical residency programs, conduct community outreach and wellness programs, and act as a safety-net hospital for the countywide under-insured and uninsured. We also leverage ARMC as an economic asset to stimulate the local economy and attract investment and professionals from outside the county.

      GO TO POLICY
    15. Policy HW-2.1 Lifelong learning

      We collaborate with educators, the business community, students and families, recreation departments and other public agencies, and civic and not-for-profit organizations to foster lifelong learning including early childhood literacy, cradle to career education, English as a second language, career development, and adult enrichment. We encourage approaches to learning that embrace diverse modes of learning for all.

      GO TO POLICY
    16. Policy HW-2.2 Land use compatibility for schools

      We prioritize the safety and security of public schools in unincorporated areas by minimizing incompatible land uses near instructional facilities. We encourage school districts to place new schools where existing and planned land uses are compatible.

      GO TO POLICY
    17. Policy HW-2.3 Superintendent support

      We support the Superintendent of Schools in fulfilling the obligations for school district support, advocacy, and student services.

      GO TO POLICY
    18. Policy HW-2.4 Health and enrichment programs

      We provide additional support for school districts for nutrition, physical activity, arts, and other enrichment programs, commensurate with the availability of grants and other funding resources.

      GO TO POLICY
    19. Policy HW-3.1 Healthy environments

      We collaborate with other public agencies, not-for-profit organizations, community groups, and private developers to improve the physical and built environment in which people live. We do so by improving such things as walkability, bicycle infrastructure, transit facilities, universal design, safe routes to school, indoor and outdoor air quality, gardens, green space and open space, and access to parks and recreation amenities.

      GO TO POLICY
    20. Policy HW-3.2 Building social capital

      In unincorporated communities, we support the provision of neighborhood and community gathering places for social activities, and the provision of meeting spaces and facilities for community organizations in order to build social capital, establish a sense of community, increase volunteerism, and expand civic engagement.

      GO TO POLICY
    21. Policy HW-3.3 Public libraries

      We operate public libraries in unincorporated areas and contract cities/towns to provide programs and facilities that ensure equitable access to information and digital technology, provide places and activities for people to connect with other people, promote literacy and reading for pleasure for children and adults, and foster a culture of creativity, innovation, and collaboration. We invest in the modernization and expansion of public library facilities as adequate funding is available.

      GO TO POLICY
    22. Policy HW-3.4 Public museums

      We operate County museums to preserve and depict the history, culture, and natural science of San Bernardino County. We invest in facilities and technology and collaborate with other institutions, organizations, and businesses in order to increase public exposure to museum holdings.

      GO TO POLICY
    23. Policy HW-3.5 Arts and culture

      We increase awareness of the benefits of the arts throughout the county by recognizing and promoting the arts, artists, performing arts, and cultural organizations as valuable resources for community identity, economic vitality, and tourism. We encourage private and not-for-profit support of artistic and cultural activities through mutual programs and public-private partnerships.

      GO TO POLICY
    24. Policy HW-3.6 Multi-use facilities and integrated development

      We encourage those who build and/or operate community assets to accommodate multiple functions and programs. We encourage the development of new residential, commercial, and institutional uses and public facilities that incorporate one or more community assets.

      GO TO POLICY
    25. Policy HW-3.7 Attracting local-serving businesses

      We actively work across County departments and agencies to attract businesses that provide desired goods and services in unincorporated communities, especially in environmental justice focus areas, including but not limited to food stores with fresh produce, health care, child care, pharmacies, and other retailers. We balance community desires with comprehensive assessments of market demand to guide our business attraction efforts.

      GO TO POLICY
    26. Policy HW-3.8 Attracting leisure and entertainment

      We advocate for the establishment and retention of leisure and entertainment businesses and venues, countywide, that contribute to the complete county concept.

      GO TO POLICY
    27. Policy HW-3.9 Community-driven improvements

      We provide resources and information to assist unincorporated communities with the implementation of Community Action Guides.

      GO TO POLICY
    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps HW-1 Educational Facilities (PDF | WEB)
    2. Policy Maps HW-2 Public Facilities (PDF | WEB)
  • Goals
    1. Goal HZ-1 Natural Environmental Hazards

      Minimized risk of injury, loss of life, property damage, and economic and social disruption caused by natural environmental hazards and adaptation to potential changes in climate

      GO TO GOAL
    2. Goal HZ-2 Human-Generated Hazards

      People and the natural environment protected from exposure to hazardous materials, excessive noise, and other human-generated hazards

      GO TO GOAL
    Policies
    1. Policy HZ-1.1 New subdivisions in environmental hazard areas

      We require all lots and parcels created through new subdivisions to have sufficient buildable area outside of the following environmental hazard areas:

      • Flood: 100-year flood zone, dam/basin inundation area
      • Geologic: Alquist Priolo earthquake fault zone; County-identified fault zone; rockfall/debris-flow hazard area, existing and County-identified landslide area
      GO TO POLICY
    2. Policy HZ-1.2 New development in environmental hazard areas

      We require all new development to be located outside of the environmental hazard areas listed below. For any lot or parcel that does not have sufficient buildable area outside of such hazard areas, we require adequate mitigation, including designs that allow occupants to shelter in place and to have sufficient time to evacuate during times of extreme weather and natural disasters.

      • Flood: 100-year flood zone, dam/basin inundation area
      • Geologic: Alquist Priolo earthquake fault zone; County-identified fault zone; rockfall/debris-flow hazard area, medium or high liquefaction area (low to high and localized), existing and County-identified landslide area, moderate to high landslide susceptibility area)
      • Fire: high or very high fire hazard severity zone
      GO TO POLICY
    3. Policy HZ-1.3 Floodplain mapping

      We require any new lots or subdivisions partially in, and any new development partially or entirely in 100-year flood zones or 100-year flood awareness areas to provide detail floodplain mapping for 100- and 200-year storm events as part of the development approval process.

      GO TO POLICY
    4. Policy HZ-1.4 500-year flood zone

      We may collaborate with property owners in the Valley region to establish funding and financing mechanisms to mitigate flood hazards in identified 500-year flood zones.

      GO TO POLICY
    5. Policy HZ-1.5 Existing properties in environmental hazard areas

      We encourage owners of existing properties in hazard areas to add design features that allow occupants to shelter in place and to have sufficient time to evacuate during times of extreme weather and natural disasters.

      GO TO POLICY
    6. Policy HZ-1.6 Critical and essential facility location

      We require new critical and essential facilities to be located outside of hazard areas, whenever feasible.

      GO TO POLICY
    7. Policy HZ-1.7 Underground utilities

      We require that underground utilities be designed to withstand seismic forces, accommodate ground settlement, and hardened to fire risk.

      GO TO POLICY
    8. Policy HZ-1.8 Wind erosion hazards

      We require new development in medium-high or high wind erosion hazard areas to minimize the effects of wind-blown soil through building and site design features such as fencing, surface treatment or pavement, attenuation or wind barriers, architectural features, building materials, and drought resistant landscaping.

      GO TO POLICY
    9. Policy HZ-1.9 Hazard areas maintained as open space

      We minimize risk associated with flood, geologic, and fire hazard zones or areas by encouraging such areas to be preserved and maintained as open space.

      GO TO POLICY
    10. Policy HZ-1.10 Energy independence

      We encourage new residential development to include rooftop solar energy systems and battery storage systems that can provide backup electrical service during temporary power outages.

      GO TO POLICY
    11. Policy HZ-1.11 Energy efficiency retrofits

      We encourage owners of existing residential and commercial properties to retrofit the walls, doors, windows, ceilings, roofs, ductwork, and other elements of their building envelopes, in order to improve energy efficiency and better protect occupants from extreme temperatures.

      GO TO POLICY
    12. Policy Policy HZ-1.12 Local hazard mitigation plan implementation

      We require adherence to the goals, objectives and actions in the Multi-jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan and subsequent amendments to reduce and mitigate damages from hazards in the county.

      GO TO POLICY
    13. Policy Policy HZ-1.13 Fire protection planning

      We require that all new development in County-designated Fire Safety Overlay and/or CAL FIRE-designated Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zones meet the requirements of the California Fire Code and the California Building Code as amended by the County Fire Protection District, including Title 14 of the California Code of Regulations fire safety requirements for any new development within State Responsibility Areas, as well as provide and maintain a Fire Protection Plan or Defensible Space/Fuel Modification Plan and other pre-planning measures in accordance with the County Code of Ordinances.

      GO TO POLICY
    14. Policy Policy HZ-1.14 Long-term fire hazard reduction and abatement

      We require proactive vegetation management/hazard abatement to reduce fire hazards on existing private properties, along roadsides of evacuation routes out of wildfire prone areas, and other private/public land where applicable, and we require new development to enter into a long-term maintenance agreement for vegetation management in defensible space, fuel modification, and roadside fuel reduction in the Fire Safety Overlay and/or Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zones.

      GO TO POLICY
    15. Policy Policy HZ-1.15 Evacuation route adequacy

      We coordinate with CAL FIRE, California’s Office of Emergency Services, and other local fire districts to identify strategies that ensure the maintenance and reliability of evacuation routes potentially compromised by wildfire, including emergency evacuation and supply transportation routes.

      GO TO POLICY
    16. Policy HZ-2.1 Hazardous waste facilities

      We regulate and buffer hazardous waste facilities to protect public health and avoid impacts on the natural environment.

      GO TO POLICY
    17. Policy HZ-2.2 Database of hazardous materials

      We maintain up-to-date databases of the storage, use, and production of hazardous materials, based on federally- and state-required disclosure and notification, to appropriately respond to potential emergencies.

      GO TO POLICY
    18. Policy HZ-2.3 Safer alternatives

      We minimize the use of hazardous materials by choosing and by encouraging others to use non-toxic alternatives that do not pose a threat to the environment.

      GO TO POLICY
    19. Policy HZ-2.4 Truck routes for hazardous materials

      We designate truck routes for the transportation of hazardous materials through unincorporated areas and prohibit routes that pass through residential neighborhoods to the maximum extent feasible.

      GO TO POLICY
    20. Policy HZ-2.5 Community education

      We engage with residents and businesses to promote safe practices related to the use, storage, transportation, and disposal of hazardous materials.

      GO TO POLICY
    21. Policy HZ-2.6 Coordination with transportation authorities

      We collaborate with airport owners, FAA, Caltrans, SBCTA, SCAG, neighboring jurisdictions, and other transportation providers in the preparation and maintenance of, and updates to transportation-related plans and projects to minimize noise impacts and provide appropriate mitigation measures.

      GO TO POLICY
    22. Policy HZ-2.7 Truck delivery areas

      We encourage truck delivery areas to be located away from residential properties and require associated noise impacts to be mitigated.

      GO TO POLICY
    23. Policy HZ-2.8 Proximity to noise generating uses

      We limit or restrict new noise sensitive land uses in proximity to existing conforming noise generating uses and planned industrial areas.

      GO TO POLICY
    24. Policy HZ-2.9 Control sound at the source

      We prioritize noise mitigation measures that control sound at the source before buffers, soundwalls, and other perimeter measures.

      GO TO POLICY
    25. Policy HZ-2.10 Agricultural operations

      We require new development adjacent to existing conforming agricultural operations to provide adequate buffers to reduce the exposure of new development to operational noise, odor, and the storage or application of pesticides or other hazardous materials.

      GO TO POLICY
    26. Policy HZ-2.11 Legacy abandoned mine lands

      We inventory legacy abandoned mines and require private property owners to eliminate hazardous conditions that could threaten human life and environmental contamination. We pursue funding to address legacy abandoned mines on County-owned property.

      GO TO POLICY
    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps HZ-1 Earthquake Fault Zones (PDF | WEB)
    2. Policy Maps HZ-2 Liquefaction & Landslides (PDF | WEB)
    3. Policy Maps HZ-3 Dam & Basin Hazards (PDF | WEB)
    4. Policy Maps HZ-4 Flood Hazards (PDF | WEB)
    5. Policy Maps HZ-5 Fire Hazard Severity Zones (PDF | WEB)
    6. Policy Maps HZ-6 Fire Responsibility Areas (PDF | WEB)
    7. Policy Maps HZ-7(A-C) Existing Noise Contour (PDF | WEB)
    8. Policy Maps HZ-8(A-C) Future Noise Contour (PDF only)
    9. Policy Maps HZ-9 Airport Safety & Planning (PDF | WEB)
    10. Policy Maps HZ-10 Environmental Justice & Legacy Communities (PDF | WEB)
    11. Policy Maps HZ-11 Wind Erosion Hazards (PDF | WEB)
  • Goals
    1. Goal GV-1 Decision Processes

      Decision making that implements the Countywide Plan in a clear and consistent manner

      GO TO GOAL
    Policies
    1. Policy Policy GV-1.1 Consistency with Policies and Priorities

      We require that staff recommendations to the Board of Supervisors be consistent with: the Countywide Plan; the Board’s priorities; other County strategic plans, master plans, and other long term planning documents; and the parts of the Countywide Vision that are within the authority and responsibility of the County.

      GO TO POLICY
    2. Policy Policy GV-1.2 Long-Term Benefit

      When considering and evaluating short term opportunities, we prioritize those that best move the County towards its long-term Countywide Plan goals and adds long-term value.

      GO TO POLICY
    3. Policy Policy GV-1.3 Policy Plan Amendments

      We will consider approving amendments to the Policy Plan only when the following conditions are met:

      A. The proposed change is and will be fiscally neutral or positive.

      B. The proposed change can be adequately served by public facilities and will not negatively impact existing level of service or the ability to provide future development with County services.

      C. Amendments that do not meet the conditions in A or B above may still be considered for approval if the amendment is needed to satisfy state or federal mandates (for example: state housing laws), or to enact new policy decisions consistent with the Countywide Vision.

      GO TO POLICY
    4. Policy Policy GV-1.4 Data Use for Decisions and Regulations

      We make decisions and adopt regulations based on the best data available. In order to determine the quality of data, we evaluate the legitimacy of the data source, accuracy, timeliness, resolution, and completeness.

      GO TO POLICY
    5. Policy Policy GV-1.4 Data use for decisions and regulations

      We make decisions and adopt regulations based on the best data available. In order to determine the quality of data, we evaluate the legitimacy of the data source, accuracy, timeliness, resolution, and completeness.

      GO TO POLICY
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Reduce the rate of crime in Bloomington relative to defined comparison communities
      Action Statement A.1

      1.1 Conduct a public safety community workshop.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement A.2

      1.2 Develop public safety community consensus and strategy.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Eliminate zoning and code violations, reduce non-conformities, and ensure compliance with use permit conditions to protect the investments made by residents, property owners, and business owners.
      Action Statement B.1

      2.1 Conduct a code enforcement community workshop

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.2

      2.2 Develop code enforcement community consensus and strategy

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    3. FOCUS STATEMENT C - Facilitate the provision of sewer infrastructure and sewage treatment capacity to accommodate additional residential and business development in areas of Bloomington planned for more intense development.
      Action Statement C.1

      3.1 Evaluate potential sewer infrastructure needs

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement C.2

      3.2 Develop sewer improvement community consensus and strategy

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    4. FOCUS STATEMENT D - Evaluate the feasibility and potential effectiveness of establishing truck routes to lessen traffic congestion and to reduce damage to roadways, and, if feasible, adopt designated truck routes, establish a program to upgrade truck route roadways, and prohibit truck traffic on non-truck route roads.
      Action Statement D.1

      4.1 Define the challenge and intended outcomes of a truck route plan

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement D.2

      4.2 Prepare a truck route plan

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement D.3

      4.3 Develop truck route community consensus and strategy

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement D.4

      4.4 Establish final truck routes with collaboration and approval by Department of Public Works, County Board of Supervisors, and California Highway Patrol

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement D.5

      4.5 Plan and Construct Improvements (Department of Public Works)

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    5. FOCUS STATEMENT E - Generate revenue to offset impacts of new development in Bloomington by establishing new development impact fees and financing districts, and also restricting the use of that revenue to improvements in Bloomington
      Action Statement E.1

      5.1 Present a summary of development impact fee and financing districts

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement E.2

      5.2 Community Development and Housing Department conducts nexus studies and drafts ordinance

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement E.3

      5.3 Prepare and adopt a development impact fee ordinance

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement E.4

      5.4 Conduct a financing districts community workshop

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    6. FOCUS STATEMENT F - Reduce incidence of health issues related to air quality by providing or expanding targeted programs—such as expansion of the breath-mobile, in-home health consultations, and air filters for sensitive receptors.
      Action Statement F.1

      6.1 Municipal Advisory Council assesses health conditions in Bloomington (with support of Department of Public Health and South Coast Air Quality Management District)

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement F.2

      6.2 Municipal Advisory Council conducts an air quality community workshop

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
  • Goals
    1. Goal GV-1 Decision Processes

      Decision making that implements the Countywide Plan in a clear and consistent manner

      GO TO GOAL
    2. Goal GV-2 Staff Resources

      County staff that have the education and skills necessary to provide responsive and effective service to the County’s residents, businesses, and visitors

      GO TO GOAL
    3. Goal GV-3 Implementation and Partnerships

      Continuous progress toward achievement of the Policy Plan Goals and Countywide Vision through sustained initiatives and leadership by the County, in partnership with other agencies and organizations.

      GO TO GOAL
    4. Goal GV-4 Budgeting and Fiscal Sustainability

      An easily understood, transparent, and accountable finance system that implements the Countywide Plan, safeguards the County’s assets, and maintains the public’s trust and confidence.

      GO TO GOAL
    5. Goal GV-5 Training and Feedback

      A system and process that facilitates updates to the Countywide Plan and the Board’s priorities, by tracking progress toward Policy Plan Goals and measuring the effectiveness of implementation objectives.

      GO TO GOAL
    6. Goal GV-6 Communication and Participation

      Informed and connected leaders, staff, and public through transparent, frequent, and effective communication.

      GO TO GOAL
    Policies
    1. Policy GV-1.1 Consistency With Policies and Priorities

      We require that staff recommendations to the Board of Supervisors be consistent with: the Countywide Plan; the Board’s priorities; other County strategic plans, master plans, and other long term planning documents; and the parts of the Countywide Vision that are within the authority and responsibility of the County.

      GO TO POLICY
    2. Policy GV-1.2 Long-Term Benefit

      When considering and evaluating short term opportunities, we prioritize those that best move the County towards its long-term Countywide Plan goals and adds long-term value.

      GO TO POLICY
    3. Policy GV-1.3 Policy Plan Amendments

      We will consider approving amendments to the Policy Plan only when the following conditions are met:

      A. The proposed change is and will be fiscally neutral or positive.

      B. The proposed change can be adequately served by public facilities and will not negatively impact existing level of service or the ability to provide future development with County services.

      C. Amendments that do not meet the conditions in A or B above may still be considered for approval if the amendment is needed to satisfy state or federal mandates (for example: state housing laws), or to enact new policy decisions consistent with the Countywide Vision.

      GO TO POLICY
    4. Policy GV-1.4 Data Use for Decisions and Regulations

      We make decisions and adopt regulations based on the best data available. In order to determine the quality of data, we evaluate the legitimacy of the data source, accuracy, timeliness, resolution, and completeness.

      GO TO POLICY
    5. Policy GV-2.1 Staff Development

      We invest in the training and development of County staff to ensure the provision of quality services and support their career development, consistent with the availability of resources.

      GO TO POLICY
    6. Policy GV-2.2 Recruiting

      We seek to strike a balance between promoting from within, in order to maintain institutional knowledge and employee morale, and the need to seek external sources, who may bring in new perspectives and skills.

      GO TO POLICY
    7. Policy GV-3.1 Board of Supervisors Priorities

      We set priorities and direct timely actions for implementing the Countywide Plan through periodic adoption of Board of Supervisors priorities.

      GO TO POLICY
    8. Policy GV-3.2 Related Planning

      We implement the Countywide Plan through strategic plans, master plans, and/or other long-term plans adopted and maintained by County agencies, departments, and divisions, consistent with the Policy Plan.

      GO TO POLICY
    9. Policy GV-3.3 Tools

      We create and maintain systems, procedures and technology that leverage County resources and state and federal funding to implement the Countywide Plan.

      GO TO POLICY
    10. Policy GV-3.4 Private Sector

      We recognize the importance of private sector and nongovernmental organizations in helping implement the Countywide Plan, and we structure regulations and procedures to facilitate their role in implementation.

      GO TO POLICY
    11. Policy GV-3.5 Interagency Cooperation

      We collaborate with initiatives and programs of other agencies such as local, county, regional, state and federal governments and non-profit agencies to implement the Countywide Plan.

      GO TO POLICY
    12. Policy GV-3.6 Data Maintenance

      We regularly update County-maintained datasets as resources permit, and we encourage other agencies and organizations to regularly update their data that the County uses for decision making.

      GO TO POLICY
    13. Policy GV-4.1 Balanced Budget

      We adopt an annual budget that is balanced inclusive of carry-over fund balances and reserves. We only use one-time funds for ongoing operational cost as part of a larger plan to balance ongoing revenues and expenses over a multi-year period.

      GO TO POLICY
    14. Policy GV-4.2 Fiscal Impact Disclosure

      We require requests for Board of Supervisors action to disclose the full fiscal impacts, including direct and indirect costs, to ensure that all decisions are fiscally sustainable. Proposals for projects or programs requesting County support or funding must also disclose whether County support or funding is required to maintain the project or continue the program in the future.

      GO TO POLICY
    15. Policy GV-4.3 Assessment of Risk

      We require a thorough exploration and analysis of the short and long term risks associated with recommendations for Board actions on County commitments.

      GO TO POLICY
    16. Policy GV-4.4 Resource Allocation

      We consider the complete comparative context of all County needs and responsibilities when making resource allocation decisions.

      GO TO POLICY
    17. Policy GV-4.5 District Considerations

      We allocate resources, while acting as a body of the whole, for their highest and best use within the County. Each Supervisor is responsible for communicating the needs and opportunities within their District to the body, so that they can be given appropriate consideration by the entire Board in this process.

      GO TO POLICY
    18. Policy GV-4.6 Budget Forecasts

      We forecast revenues for the annual budget based on historical trends analysis of federal, state, and local economic projections, and an assessment of economic, demographic, business cycle, and other factors. We conservatively estimate and budget revenue sources that tend to be volatile and most sensitive to changes in the economy. We specify the assumptions underlying our forecast and adjust such assumptions based on actual performance.

      GO TO POLICY
    19. Policy GV-4.7 Property Tax Revenue Stabilization

      We appropriate anticipated property tax revenue growth, in excess of the lesser of eight percent or the average annualized rate of growth of actual revenues, to an ongoing revenue stabilization set-aside contingency.

      GO TO POLICY
    20. Policy GV-4.8 Prop 172 Revenue Stabilization

      We set aside any Prop 172 revenue in excess of the lesser of eight percent or the average annualized rate of growth of actual revenues, to an ongoing Prop 172 revenue stabilization set-aside contingency.

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    21. Policy GV-4.9 Program Efficiency

      We prioritize efficiency and economy in the provision of County services, and we measure and evaluate performance to encourage productivity improvements.

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    22. Policy GV-4.10 Grant Funding

      We proactively pursue grant funding from federal, state, and local agencies and private foundations, but in deciding which opportunities to pursue, we consider the current and future implications of accepting or declining grants, including the amount of local matching funds required, the extent and nature of in-kind services required, duration, the obligation of the County to continue the service after the grant ends, and related operating expenditures.

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    23. Policy GV-4.11 Cost Recovery

      We annually review and update the full direct- and indirect-costs of providing County services, and we establish and annually update fees or charges to recover the full cost of County services.

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    24. Policy GV-4.12 Maintenance and Replacement Costs

      We shall incorporate maintenance and replacement costs in the pricing of new programs and facilities as well as recording such deferred costs as debits against revenues.

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    25. Policy GV-4.13 Retirement System Funding Reserve

      For savings resulting from negative Unfunded Accrued Actuarial Liability contribution rates, we prioritize setting aside these savings in reserve for reduction of any existing pension obligation bonds or in reserve against future rate increases.

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    26. Policy GV-4.14 Risk Management

      We maintain an 80 percent confidence level in all risk management self-insurance funds as determined by a yearly actuarial study.

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    27. Policy GV-4.15 Funding Municipal Services

      We seek to reduce and ultimately eliminate the ongoing subsidization of municipal services in unincorporated areas.

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    28. Policy GV-5.1 Data-Influenced Decisions

      We maintain a tracking and feedback system to provide meaningful data and useful information to influence public decisions.

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    29. Policy GV-5.2 Awareness

      We monitor external forces impacting San Bernardino County to build on their positive impacts and to ameliorate their negative impacts.

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    30. Policy GV-5.3 Proactive Approach

      We shall seek to influence external factors impacting San Bernardino County sooner rather than later.

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    31. Policy GV-6.1 Quality and Accessibility

      We require a professional standard of quality and accessibility, across mediums, to communicate information with the accuracy, validity, and honesty that befits this County.

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    32. Policy GV-6.2 Internal Coordination

      We require coordination of communication activities and products across the County organization so that coherent and consistent information is delivered.

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    33. Policy GV-6.3 Regular Communication

      We foster an organizational culture that communicates regularly and proactively with customers, employees, and stakeholders.

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    34. Policy GV-6.5 Broad and Diverse Participation

      We engage all segments of the community in County planning efforts and local decision making and facilitate robust participation by: A. Providing materials and information to enable those interested in public processes to have informed and effective participation;
      B. Using convenient and accessible locations and facilities for public meetings;
      C. Providing other means of participation, such as written comments or online surveys, as an alternative to attending public meetings; and
      D. Encouraging broad and diverse membership on County committees and commissions, seeking to provide voice to the underrepresented.

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    35. Policy GV-6.6 Social Capital

      We cultivate broad support for public decisions by encouraging voting and civic engagement, promoting the development and use of gathering places, and facilitating volunteerism in the public sphere. In unincorporated areas, we also coordinate such actions through Community Action Guides.

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