Search Results

All content (like policies or maps) is tagged with one or more terms. Select a Topic or Geography to search the Policy Plan, Business Plan, and Community Action Guides for related content. You will be able to apply additional filters to further refine the search results.

Narrow results by applying additional filters

Topics

Geographies

Showing results for:

  • Policies
    1. Policy LU-4.2 Fire-adapted communities

      We require new development in high or very high fire hazard severity zones to apply fire-resistant design techniques, including fuel modification areas, fire resistant landscaping, and fire-resistant building materials.

      GO TO POLICY
    2. Policy LU-4.3 Native or drought-tolerant landscaping

      We require new development, when outside of high and very high fire hazard severity zones, to install and maintain drought-tolerant landscaping and encourage the use of native species.

      GO TO POLICY
    3. Policy LU-4.4 Natural topography in the Mountain region

      We require new development in the Mountain region to retain natural topography and minimize grading unless it is necessary to reduce exposure to natural hazards.

      GO TO POLICY
    4. Policy LU-5.1 Military land use compatibility

      We coordinate with military stakeholders to ensure compatible land uses in areas where military operations on or off installations could affect public health and safety, or where civilian activities could have an impact on current or future military operations. We will coordinate with military stakeholders to resolve existing land use conflicts and protect public safety in the Military Influence Overlay.

      GO TO POLICY
  • Policies
    1. Policy M/H-1.1 Site design

      We regulate the density, mass, and height of residential development in hillside areas in order to reduce fire hazards, prevent erosion, preserve natural viewsheds, and maintain the forest character of the Mountain Region.

      GO TO POLICY
  • Goals
    1. Goal IU-3 Stormwater Drainage

      A regional stormwater drainage backbone and local stormwater facilities in unincorporated areas that reduce the risk of flooding

      GO TO GOAL
    Policies
    1. Policy IU-1.10 Connected systems

      We encourage local water distribution systems to interconnect with regional and other local systems, where feasible, to assist in the transfer of water resources during droughts and emergencies.

      GO TO POLICY
    2. Policy IU-3.1 Regional flood control

      We maintain a regional flood control system and regularly evaluate the need for and implement upgrades based on changing land coverage and hydrologic conditions in order to manage and reduce flood risk. We require any public and private projects proposed anywhere in the county to address and mitigate any adverse impacts on the carrying capacity and stormwater velocity of regional stormwater drainage systems.

      GO TO POLICY
    3. Policy IU-3.3 Recreational use

      We prefer that stormwater facilities be designed and maintained to allow for regional open space and safe recreation use without compromising the ability to provide flood risk reduction.

      GO TO POLICY
    4. Policy IU-3.4 Natural floodways

      We retain existing natural floodways and watercourses on County-controlled floodways, including natural channel bottoms, unless hardening and channelization is the only feasible way to manage flood risk. On floodways not controlled by the County, we encourage the retention of natural floodways and watercourses. Our priority is to reduce flood risk, but we also strive to protect wildlife corridors, prevent loss of critical habitat, and improve the amount and quality of surface water and groundwater resources.

      GO TO POLICY
    5. Policy IU-3.5 Fair share requirements

      We require new development to pay its fair share of capital costs to maintain adequate capacity of the County’s regional flood control systems.

      GO TO POLICY
    6. Policy IU-5.5 Energy and fuel facilities

      We encourage the development and upgrade of energy and regional fuel facilities in areas that do not pose significant environmental or public health and safety hazards, and in a manner that is compatible with military operations and local community identity.

      GO TO POLICY
  • Goals
    1. Goal TM-1 Roadway Capacity

      Unincorporated areas served by roads with capacity that is adequate for residents, businesses, tourists, and emergency services

      GO TO GOAL
    Policies
    1. Policy TM-1.4 Unpaved roadways

      The County does not accept new unpaved roads into the County Maintained Road System, and we require all-weather treatment for all new unpaved roads.

      GO TO POLICY
    2. Policy TM-1.8 Emergency access

      When considering new roadway improvement proposals for the CIP or RTP, we consider the provision of adequate emergency access routes along with capacity expansion in unincorporated areas. Among access route improvements, we prioritize those that contribute some funding through a local area funding and financing mechanism.

      GO TO POLICY
  • Goals
    1. Goal PP-3 Fire and Emergency Medical

      Reduced risk of death, injury, property damage, and economic loss due to fires and other natural disasters, accidents, and medical incidents through prompt and capable emergency response.

      GO TO GOAL
    Policies
    1. Policy PP-4.1 Emergency management plans

      A reduced risk of and impact from injury, loss of life, property damage, and economic and social disruption resulting from emergencies, natural disasters, and potential changes in climate.

      GO TO POLICY
    2. Policy PP-4.2 Critical and essential facility operation

      We ensure that critical and essential County facilities remain operational during emergencies.

      GO TO POLICY
    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps PP-2 Evacuation Routes (PDF | WEB)
  • Policies
    1. Policy NR-3.2 Residential clustering

      We allow residential development to cluster housing units in order to reduce the consumption of undeveloped land, maximize the amount of open space, preserve natural resources, conform to natural topography/grade, and/or reduce exposure of structures to natural hazards.

      GO TO POLICY
    2. Policy NR-7.1 Protection of agricultural land

      We protect economically viable and productive agricultural lands from the adverse effects of urban encroachment, particularly increased erosion and sedimentation, trespass, and non-agricultural land development.

      GO TO POLICY
  • Policies
    1. Policy RE-4.3

      Require construction and operation of all renewable energy facilities to minimize negative effects and optimize benefits to unincorporated communities.

      • RE 4.3.1: Define measures required to minimize ground disturbance, soil erosion, flooding, and blowing of sand and dust, with appropriate enforcement mechanisms in the Development Code.
      • RE 4.3.2: Require operators to track and report energy production and other benefits cited in a project proposal, in addition to tracking efforts to avoid and minimize negative impacts.
      • RE 4.3.3: Give preference to the utilization of existing infrastructure to minimize the need for additional transmission development.
      • RE 4.3.4: Establish inspection protocols and programs to ensure that RE facilities are constructed, operated, and eventually decommissioned consistent with the requirements of the San Bernardino County Code, and in a manner that will not be detrimental to the public health, safety, or welfare.
      GO TO POLICY
  • Goals
    1. Goal HZ-1 Natural Environmental Hazards

      Minimized risk of injury, loss of life, property damage, and economic and social disruption caused by natural environmental hazards and adaptation to potential changes in climate

      GO TO GOAL
    2. Goal HZ-2 Human-Generated Hazards

      People and the natural environment protected from exposure to hazardous materials, excessive noise, and other human-generated hazards

      GO TO GOAL
    3. Goal HZ-3 Environmental Justice

      For unincorporated environmental justice focus areas, equitable levels of protection from environmental and health hazards; expanded opportunities for physical activity and meaningful civic engagement; and access to healthy food, public facilities, safe and sanitary housing.

      GO TO GOAL
    Policies
    1. Policy HZ-1.1 New subdivisions in environmental hazard areas

      We require all lots and parcels created through new subdivisions to have sufficient buildable area outside of the following environmental hazard areas:

      • Flood: 100-year flood zone, dam/basin inundation area
      • Geologic: Alquist Priolo earthquake fault zone; County-identified fault zone; rockfall/debris-flow hazard area, existing and County-identified landslide area
      GO TO POLICY
    2. Policy HZ-1.2 New development in environmental hazard areas

      We require all new development to be located outside of the environmental hazard areas listed below. For any lot or parcel that does not have sufficient buildable area outside of such hazard areas, we require adequate mitigation, including designs that allow occupants to shelter in place and to have sufficient time to evacuate during times of extreme weather and natural disasters.

      • Flood: 100-year flood zone, dam/basin inundation area
      • Geologic: Alquist Priolo earthquake fault zone; County-identified fault zone; rockfall/debris-flow hazard area, medium or high liquefaction area (low to high and localized), existing and County-identified landslide area, moderate to high landslide susceptibility area)
      • Fire: high or very high fire hazard severity zone
      GO TO POLICY
    3. Policy HZ-1.3 Floodplain mapping

      We require any new lots or subdivisions partially in, and any new development partially or entirely in 100-year flood zones or 100-year flood awareness areas to provide detail floodplain mapping for 100- and 200-year storm events as part of the development approval process.

      GO TO POLICY
    4. Policy HZ-1.4 500-year flood zone

      We may collaborate with property owners in the Valley region to establish funding and financing mechanisms to mitigate flood hazards in identified 500-year flood zones.

      GO TO POLICY
    5. Policy HZ-1.5 Existing properties in environmental hazard areas

      We encourage owners of existing properties in hazard areas to add design features that allow occupants to shelter in place and to have sufficient time to evacuate during times of extreme weather and natural disasters.

      GO TO POLICY
    6. Policy HZ-1.6 Critical and essential facility location

      We require new critical and essential facilities to be located outside of hazard areas, whenever feasible.

      GO TO POLICY
    7. Policy HZ-1.7 Underground utilities

      We require that underground utilities be designed to withstand seismic forces, accommodate ground settlement, and hardened to fire risk.

      GO TO POLICY
    8. Policy HZ-1.8 Wind erosion hazards

      We require new development in medium-high or high wind erosion hazard areas to minimize the effects of wind-blown soil through building and site design features such as fencing, surface treatment or pavement, attenuation or wind barriers, architectural features, building materials, and drought resistant landscaping.

      GO TO POLICY
    9. Policy HZ-1.9 Hazard areas maintained as open space

      We minimize risk associated with flood, geologic, and fire hazard zones or areas by encouraging such areas to be preserved and maintained as open space.

      GO TO POLICY
    10. Policy HZ-1.10 Energy independence

      We encourage new residential development to include rooftop solar energy systems and battery storage systems that can provide backup electrical service during temporary power outages.

      GO TO POLICY
    11. Policy HZ-1.11 Energy efficiency retrofits

      We encourage owners of existing residential and commercial properties to retrofit the walls, doors, windows, ceilings, roofs, ductwork, and other elements of their building envelopes, in order to improve energy efficiency and better protect occupants from extreme temperatures.

      GO TO POLICY
    12. Policy Policy HZ-1.12 Local hazard mitigation plan implementation

      We require adherence to the goals, objectives and actions in the Multi-jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan and subsequent amendments to reduce and mitigate damages from hazards in the county.

      GO TO POLICY
    13. Policy Policy HZ-1.13 Fire protection planning

      We require that all new development in County-designated Fire Safety Overlay and/or CAL FIRE-designated Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zones meet the requirements of the California Fire Code and the California Building Code as amended by the County Fire Protection District, including Title 14 of the California Code of Regulations fire safety requirements for any new development within State Responsibility Areas, as well as provide and maintain a Fire Protection Plan or Defensible Space/Fuel Modification Plan and other pre-planning measures in accordance with the County Code of Ordinances.

      GO TO POLICY
    14. Policy Policy HZ-1.14 Long-term fire hazard reduction and abatement

      We require proactive vegetation management/hazard abatement to reduce fire hazards on existing private properties, along roadsides of evacuation routes out of wildfire prone areas, and other private/public land where applicable, and we require new development to enter into a long-term maintenance agreement for vegetation management in defensible space, fuel modification, and roadside fuel reduction in the Fire Safety Overlay and/or Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zones.

      GO TO POLICY
    15. Policy Policy HZ-1.15 Evacuation route adequacy

      We coordinate with CAL FIRE, California’s Office of Emergency Services, and other local fire districts to identify strategies that ensure the maintenance and reliability of evacuation routes potentially compromised by wildfire, including emergency evacuation and supply transportation routes.

      GO TO POLICY
    16. Policy HZ-2.1 Hazardous waste facilities

      We regulate and buffer hazardous waste facilities to protect public health and avoid impacts on the natural environment.

      GO TO POLICY
    17. Policy HZ-2.2 Database of hazardous materials

      We maintain up-to-date databases of the storage, use, and production of hazardous materials, based on federally- and state-required disclosure and notification, to appropriately respond to potential emergencies.

      GO TO POLICY
    18. Policy HZ-2.3 Safer alternatives

      We minimize the use of hazardous materials by choosing and by encouraging others to use non-toxic alternatives that do not pose a threat to the environment.

      GO TO POLICY
    19. Policy HZ-2.4 Truck routes for hazardous materials

      We designate truck routes for the transportation of hazardous materials through unincorporated areas and prohibit routes that pass through residential neighborhoods to the maximum extent feasible.

      GO TO POLICY
    20. Policy HZ-2.5 Community education

      We engage with residents and businesses to promote safe practices related to the use, storage, transportation, and disposal of hazardous materials.

      GO TO POLICY
    21. Policy HZ-2.6 Coordination with transportation authorities

      We collaborate with airport owners, FAA, Caltrans, SBCTA, SCAG, neighboring jurisdictions, and other transportation providers in the preparation and maintenance of, and updates to transportation-related plans and projects to minimize noise impacts and provide appropriate mitigation measures.

      GO TO POLICY
    22. Policy HZ-2.7 Truck delivery areas

      We encourage truck delivery areas to be located away from residential properties and require associated noise impacts to be mitigated.

      GO TO POLICY
    23. Policy HZ-2.8 Proximity to noise generating uses

      We limit or restrict new noise sensitive land uses in proximity to existing conforming noise generating uses and planned industrial areas.

      GO TO POLICY
    24. Policy HZ-2.9 Control sound at the source

      We prioritize noise mitigation measures that control sound at the source before buffers, soundwalls, and other perimeter measures.

      GO TO POLICY
    25. Policy HZ-2.10 Agricultural operations

      We require new development adjacent to existing conforming agricultural operations to provide adequate buffers to reduce the exposure of new development to operational noise, odor, and the storage or application of pesticides or other hazardous materials.

      GO TO POLICY
    26. Policy HZ-2.11 Legacy abandoned mine lands

      We inventory legacy abandoned mines and require private property owners to eliminate hazardous conditions that could threaten human life and environmental contamination. We pursue funding to address legacy abandoned mines on County-owned property.

      GO TO POLICY
    27. Policy HZ-3.1 Health Risk Assessment

      We require projects processed by the County to provide a health risk assessment when a project could potentially increase the incremental cancer risk by 10 in 1 million or more in unincorporated environmental justice focus areas, and we require such assessments to evaluate impacts of truck traffic from the project to freeways. We establish appropriate mitigation prior to the approval of new construction, rehabilitation, or expansion permits.

      GO TO POLICY
    28. Policy HZ-3.2 Studying and monitoring

      We coordinate with state and regional regulatory entities to monitor pollution exposure, publicize pollution data, and identify solutions in unincorporated environmental justice focus areas. We work with state and regional regulatory entities to pursue grant funding to study cumulative health risks affecting such areas.

      GO TO POLICY
    29. Policy HZ-3.3 Community Emissions Reduction Plans

      We assist the air quality management districts in establishing community emissions reduction plans for unincorporated environmental justice focus areas and implement, as feasible, those parts of the plans, that are within the jurisdiction and authority of the County, with particular emphasis in addressing the types of pollution identified in the Hazard Element tables.

      GO TO POLICY
    30. Policy HZ-3.4 Residential Improvements

      In directing discretionary housing improvements investments in unincorporated communities, we encourage and prioritize investments that also address environmental conditions identified in the Hazard Element tables. We utilize code enforcement activities to enhance structural safety and property maintenance in environmental justice focus areas.

      GO TO POLICY
    31. Policy HZ-3.5 Hazardous waste facilities

      We do not permit new hazardous waste facilities to be developed in unincorporated environmental justice focus areas.

      GO TO POLICY
    32. Policy HZ-3.6 Contaminated water and soils

      We advocate for and coordinate with local and regional agencies in efforts to remediate or treat contaminated surface water, groundwater, or soils in or affecting unincorporated environmental justice focus areas. We pursue grant funding and establish partnerships to implement the County’s Site Remediation Program in unincorporated environmental justice focus areas, with particular emphasis in addressing the types of contamination identified in the Hazard Element tables.

      GO TO POLICY
    33. Policy HZ-3.7 Well Water Testing

      In unincorporated environmental justice focus areas that are not served by public water systems, we periodically test well water for contamination, identify potential funding sources, and, where feasible, provide technical assistance to implement necessary improvements, with particular emphasis in addressing the types of contamination identified in the Hazard Element tables.

      GO TO POLICY
    34. Policy HZ-3.9 Public improvements and services

      In directing discretionary investments in County provided public facilities, infrastructure, and services in unincorporated communities, we prioritize investments that also address environmental conditions identified in the Hazard Element tables.

      GO TO POLICY
    35. Policy HZ- 3.10 Multi use facilities

      We emphasize coordination efforts for joint use of public and private recreation facilities serving unincorporated environmental justice focus areas. We encourage that newly constructed or substantially remodeled public facilities serving unincorporated environmental justice focus areas be assessed and designed for features and spaces that improve the community’s access to physical activity and/or healthy food options, as feasible and appropriate to the needs of the community.

      GO TO POLICY
    36. Policy HZ-3.11 Public Health

      We utilize County Department of Public Health experience, expertise, and staffing resources to expand and improve outreach, community engagement, analysis, and implementation efforts in unincorporated environmental justice focus areas, with particular emphasis in addressing the types of health concerns identified in the Hazard Element tables.

      GO TO POLICY
    37. Policy HZ-3.14 Community desired improvements

      We assist unincorporated environmental justice focus areas to identify ways in which they might establish special funding and financing mechanisms to provide community‐desired public facilities and services, recreational facilities, sidewalks and bike trails, and access to fresh and healthy food.

      GO TO POLICY
    38. Policy HZ- 3.16 Notification

      We notify the public through the County website, mail, and other means when applications are accepted for conditional use permits, changes in zoning, and Policy Plan amendments in or adjacent to environmental justice focus areas. We prepare public notices in the predominant language(s) spoken in the communities containing environmental justice focus areas.

      GO TO POLICY
    39. Policy HZ-3.17 Community stakeholders

      We identify and coordinate with key community stakeholders through advisory committees or other methods to increase public awareness and obtain timely community input concerning potential funding opportunities, conditional use permits, changes in zoning, and amendments to the Policy Plan in or adjacent to environmental justice focus areas.

      GO TO POLICY
    40. Policy HZ-3.18 Application requirements

      In order for a Planning Project Application (excluding Minor Use Permits) to be deemed complete, we require applicants to indicate whether the project is within, adjacent to, or nearby an unincorporated environmental justice focus area and, if so, to:

      • document to the County’s satisfaction how an applicant will address environmental justice concerns potentially created by the project; and
      • present a plan to conduct at least two public meetings for nearby residents, businesses, and property owners to obtain public input for applications involving a change in zoning or the Policy Plan. The County will require additional public outreach if the proposed project changes substantively in use, scale, or intensity from the proposed project presented at previous public outreach meeting(s).
      GO TO POLICY
    41. Policy HZ-3.19 Community education

      We make educational materials available to the public in unincorporated environmental justice focus areas so that they clearly understand the potential for adverse pollution, noise, odor, vibration, and lighting and glare, and the effects of toxic materials to promote civil engagement. We require that such educational materials be developed in accordance with Plain Language Guidelines. We require that this information be made available in public spaces such as libraries and community centers, as well as on County websites and other appropriate means.

      GO TO POLICY
    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps HZ-1 Earthquake Fault Zones (PDF | WEB)
    2. Policy Maps HZ-2 Liquefaction & Landslides (PDF | WEB)
    3. Policy Maps HZ-3 Dam & Basin Hazards (PDF | WEB)
    4. Policy Maps HZ-4 Flood Hazards (PDF | WEB)
    5. Policy Maps HZ-5 Fire Hazard Severity Zones (PDF | WEB)
    6. Policy Maps HZ-6 Fire Responsibility Areas (PDF | WEB)
    7. Policy Maps HZ-7(A-C) Existing Noise Contour (PDF | WEB)
    8. Policy Maps HZ-8(A-C) Future Noise Contour (PDF only)
    9. Policy Maps HZ-9 Airport Safety & Planning (PDF | WEB)
    10. Policy Maps HZ-10 Environmental Justice & Legacy Communities (PDF | WEB)
    11. Policy Maps HZ-11 Wind Erosion Hazards (PDF | WEB)
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT F - Reduce incidence of health issues related to air quality by providing or expanding targeted programs—such as expansion of the breath-mobile, in-home health consultations, and air filters for sensitive receptors.
      Action Statement F.1

      6.1 Municipal Advisory Council assesses health conditions in Bloomington (with support of Department of Public Health and South Coast Air Quality Management District)

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement F.2

      6.2 Municipal Advisory Council conducts an air quality community workshop

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT C - Improve public and equestrian safety within Muscoy
      Action Statement C.3

      Partner with the San Bernardino County Sheriff Department, County Fire Department, local safety experts, and insurance companies to educate property owners on securing homes and businesses.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT E - Defend community safety including on roads in the forest
      Action Statement E.1

      Meet with City of Glendora, County of Los Angeles County, California Highway Patrol, and the United States Forest Service (USFS) to discuss conditions of Glendora Ridge Road and Glendora Mountain Road to consider how and when to close the roadways during adverse conditions or to permanently close the road for exclusive use by non-motorized pedestrian and bicycle users.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT C - Ensure communities are protected from natural disasters
      Action Statement C.1

      Follow Urban Wildlife Interface Protections.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Improve public safety; EMS, fire and sheriff.
      Action Statement B.2

      Install a distributed water supply in case of fire emergencies (10 – 12 tanks).

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.3

      Establish primary and back-up emergency communication systems.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.4

      Establish a local resident recruiting program for both the Citizens on Patrol and the Volunteer Fire Department.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.5

      Educate property owners to maintain a 100 foot clearance around homes in the community to reduce fire risk.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT D - Enhance public safety by improving communication and coordination with law enforcement.
      Action Statement D.4

      Partner with the Sheriff’s Department, Cal Fire, local safety experts, and insurance companies to educate property owners on securing homes and businesses.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Improve public health and safety in Homestead Valley
      Action Statement B.1

      Prepare a community flash flood protection plan, identifying the areas that are most vulnerable to flash floods and developing strategies to make the community more resilient to these events.*

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.4

      Advocate for the reactivation of Fire Station #43 in Johnson Valley and research state and federal grant funding opportunities along with local fundraising efforts and other strategies to assist with funding operation of the Fire Station.*

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
  • Policies
    1. Policy GV-4.8 Prop 172 Revenue Stabilization

      We set aside any Prop 172 revenue in excess of the lesser of eight percent or the average annualized rate of growth of actual revenues, to an ongoing Prop 172 revenue stabilization set-aside contingency.

      GO TO POLICY