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  • Goals
    1. Goal LU-1 Fiscally Sustainable Growth

      Growth and development that builds thriving communities, contributes to our Complete County, and is fiscally sustainable.

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    2. Goal LU-2 Land Use Mix and Compatibility

      An arrangement of land uses that balances the lifestyle of existing residents, the needs of future generations, opportunities for commercial and industrial development, and the value of the natural environment.

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    3. Goal LU-3 Annexations and Sphere Development

      Annexations and development in spheres of influence that improve the provision of public services to incorporated and unincorporated residents and businesses.

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    4. Goal LU-4 Community Design

      Preservation and enhancement of unique community identities and their relationship with the natural environment

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    5. Goal LU-5 Military Mission

      The federal government maintains and invests in military facilities and operations in the county to further the mission of national defense, thereby generating employment opportunities for residents and commercial opportunities for businesses in the county.

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    6. Goal LU-6 Amendments to the Policy Plan

      Growth and development in the unincorporated county in a manner that requires few and infrequent amendments to the Policy Plan

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    Policies
    1. Policy LU-1.1 Growth

      We support growth and development that is fiscally sustainable for the County. We accommodate growth in the unincorporated county when it benefits existing communities, provides a regional housing option for rural lifestyles, or supports the regional economy.

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    2. Policy LU-1.2 Infill development

      We prefer new development to take place on existing vacant and underutilized lots where public services and infrastructure are available.

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    3. Policy LU-1.3 Fiscal sustainability

      When determining fiscal impacts, we consider initial capital investments, long-term operations and maintenance, desired levels of service for public facilities and services, capital reserves for replacement, and impacts to existing uses in incorporated and unincorporated areas.

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    4. Policy LU-1.4 Funding and financing mechanisms

      We require the establishment of community facility districts, lighting and landscaping maintenance districts, and other types of funding and financing mechanisms for new development when the County determines that it may be necessary to maintain fiscal sustainability. We prefer the expansion of existing districts to the establishment of new districts.

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    5. Policy LU-1.5 Development impact fees

      We require payment of development impact fees to ensure that all new development pays its fair share of public infrastructure.

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    6. Policy LU-1.6 Tax sharing

      We may utilize tax sharing as a tool to extend public facilities and services from adjacent municipalities into unincorporated areas as an alternative to the County’s direct provision of public facilities and services when it is fiscally sustainable for the County.

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    7. Policy LU-2.1 Compatibility with existing uses

      We require that new development is located, scaled, buffered, and designed to minimize negative impacts on existing conforming uses and adjacent neighborhoods. We also require that new residential developments are located, scaled, buffered, and designed so as to not hinder the viability and continuity of existing conforming nonresidential development.

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    8. Policy LU-2.2 Compatibility with planned uses

      We require that new residential development is located, scaled, buffered, and designed to minimize negative impacts both on and from adjacent areas designated for nonresidential land uses.

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    9. Policy LU-2.3 Compatibility with natural environment

      We require that new development is located, scaled, buffered, and designed for compatibility with the surrounding natural environment and biodiversity.

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    10. Policy LU-2.4 Land Use Map consistency

      We consider proposed development that is consistent with the Land Use Map (i.e., it does not require a change in Land Use Category), to be generally compatible and consistent with surrounding land uses and a community’s identity. Additional site, building, and landscape design treatment, per other policies in the Policy Plan and development standards in the Development Code, may be required to maximize compatibility with surrounding land uses and community identity.

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    11. Policy LU-2.5 Hillside preservation

      We require that new development in sloping hillside areas preserve the natural character of the surrounding environment and does not further exacerbate natural hazards or erosion.

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    12. Policy LU-2.6 Coordination with adjacent entities

      We require that new and amended development projects notify and coordinate with adjacent local, state, and federal entities to maximize land use compatibility, inform future planning and implementation, and realize mutually beneficial outcomes.

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    13. Policy LU-2.7 Countywide jobs-housing balance

      We prioritize growth that furthers a countywide balance of jobs and housing to reduce vehicle miles traveled, increase job opportunities and household income, and improve quality of life. We also strive for growth that furthers a balance of jobs and housing in the North Desert region and the Valley region.

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    14. Policy LU-2.8 Rural lifestyle in the Mountain/Desert regions

      We intend that new residential development in the unincorporated Mountain and Desert regions offer a lower intensity lifestyle that complements the suburban and urban densities in incorporated cities and towns to provide a range of lifestyle options. Master planned communities in unincorporated Mountain/Desert regions may provide a broader range of lifestyles and densities.

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    15. Policy LU-2.9 Suburban lifestyles in the Valley region

      We intend that new residential development in the unincorporated Valley region offer a suburban lifestyle that is similar to that of adjacent cities.

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    16. Policy LU-2.10 Unincorporated commercial development

      We intend that new commercial development in the unincorporated areas serve unincorporated residential areas, tourists, and/or freeway travelers. We encourage new commercial development to be concentrated to enhance pedestrian circulation and reduce vehicular congestion and vehicle miles traveled, with new development directed into existing centralized areas when possible.

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    17. Policy LU-2.11 Office and industrial development in the Mountain/Desert regions

      We allow new office and industrial uses in unincorporated Mountain/Desert regions in order to meet the service, employment, and support needs of the unincorporated areas.

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    18. Policy LU-2.12 Office and industrial development in the Valley region

      We encourage office and industrial uses in the unincorporated Valley region in order to promote a countywide jobs-housing balance.

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    19. Policy LU-2.13 Short-term private home rentals

      We enforce appropriate operation standards, maintenance standards, and permitting procedures for the establishment and maintenance of short-term private home rentals in the unincorporated areas.

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    20. Policy LU-2.14 Contiguous land administration

      We support the consolidation of disconnected land areas under public ownership or administration to increase financial and environmental value, streamline the management of land and resources, and establish more complete and effective transition areas or buffers. Such consolidation may include transfer of title of property among public entities and the purchase or swapping of private property voluntarily sold when the consolidation is fiscally neutral or beneficial to the County.

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    21. Policy LU-3.1 Annexation of unincorporated areas

      We support the annexation of unincorporated areas when it will result in a more effective and efficient provision of public services and a net fiscal benefit to the County.

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    22. Policy LU-3.2 Annexations with planned incompatible land uses

      We oppose annexations when future planned land uses for the proposed annexation area would be incompatible with the remaining adjacent unincorporated lands.

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    23. Policy LU-3.3 City/town standards in SOIs

      Upon negotiation with individual jurisdictions, we may require new development in unincorporated municipal sphere of influence areas to apply the improvement standards for roads and sidewalks of the incorporated jurisdiction.

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    24. Policy LU-3.4 Development project annexations

      When a property owner proposes annexation to facilitate new development adjacent to an unincorporated residential area, we prefer that the annexation includes the adjacent residential area.

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    25. Policy LU-4.1 Context-sensitive design in the Mountain/Desert regions

      We require new development to employ site and building design techniques and use building materials that reflect the natural mountain or desert environment and preserve scenic resources.

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    26. Policy LU-4.2 Fire-adapted communities

      We require new development in high or very high fire hazard severity zones to apply fire-resistant design techniques, including fuel modification areas, fire resistant landscaping, and fire-resistant building materials.

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    27. Policy LU-4.3 Native or drought-tolerant landscaping

      We require new development, when outside of high and very high fire hazard severity zones, to install and maintain drought-tolerant landscaping and encourage the use of native species.

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    28. Policy LU-4.4 Natural topography in the Mountain region

      We require new development in the Mountain region to retain natural topography and minimize grading unless it is necessary to reduce exposure to natural hazards.

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    29. Policy LU-4.5 Community identity

      We require that new development be consistent with and reinforce the physical and historical character and identity of our unincorporated communities, as described in Table LU-3 and in the values section of Community Action Guides. In addition, we consider the aspirations section of Community Action Guides in our review of new development.

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    30. Policy LU-4.6 Adaptive reuse

      We encourage the rehabilitation, adaptive reuse, and revitalization of existing structures to preserve and celebrate the unique sense of place, identity, and history of our communities.

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    31. Policy LU-4.7 Dark skies

      We minimize light pollution and glare to preserve views of the night sky, particularly in the Mountain and Desert regions where dark skies are fundamentally connected to community identities and local economies. We also promote the preservation of dark skies to assist the military in testing, training, and operations.

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    32. Policy LU-4.8 Public gathering spaces

      We require the development of safe and attractive public gathering spaces that facilitate social interaction, community events, and physical activity in master planned communities, large residential developments, and large commercial developments.

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    33. Policy LU-4.9 CPTED

      We require public gathering spaces to use CPTED (crime prevention through environmental design) principles and ensure sufficient access for public safety services.

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    34. Policy LU-4.10 Entry monumentation, signage, and public art

      We encourage the installation of durable signage, entry monumentation, and/or works of public art in commercial areas of unincorporated Community Planning Areas as a means of reinforcing a community’s character, culture, heritage, or other unique features.

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    35. Policy LU-4.11 Businesses in Joshua Tree

      We prohibit the establishment of franchise businesses in the commercial focus area/franchise-restricted in Joshua Tree to preserve the unique community character and its value as a year-round, world renowned tourist destination.

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    36. Policy LU-5.1 Military land use compatibility

      We coordinate with military stakeholders to ensure compatible land uses in areas where military operations on or off installations could affect public health and safety, or where civilian activities could have an impact on current or future military operations. We will coordinate with military stakeholders to resolve existing land use conflicts and protect public safety in the Military Influence Overlay.

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    37. Policy LU-5.2 Military Influence Overlay

      We require conditional use permits for projects within the Military Influence Overlay that could penetrate the defined floor elevation of the military airspace, or that could encroach upon military operations. We consider how development of roads and infrastructure within the Military Influence Overlay will promote growth that might lead to incompatible land use.

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    38. Policy LU-5.3 Open space for military activity and buffering

      We engage with military installations to preserve open space areas to facilitate military training and operations and to buffer civilian areas from military activity.

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    39. Policy LU-5.4 Ranged activities and projects

      We require activities and projects that can exert impacts beyond project boundaries, such as renewable energy facilities, wireless communication systems, and unmanned aircraft systems, to coordinate with military installations in preliminary planning and throughout the project’s construction stages and long-term operation.

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    40. Policy LU-5.5 Transportation and infrastructure

      We consider military needs for operations and training when planning and improving local and regional transportation and infrastructure systems.

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    41. Policy LU-5.6 Military partnerships

      We maintain effective partnerships among military and community stakeholders and pursue joint projects that provide long-term mutual benefits for the military, County, and general public.

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    42. Policy LU-5.7 Economic development opportunities with the military

      We leverage our relationship and increased coordination with the military to expand employment and commercial opportunities with military agencies.

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    43. Policy LU-6.1 Residential amendments that increase density in the Desert and Mountain regions

      We discourage policy plan amendments that would permit new development on lots smaller than 2.5 acres in the Desert regions and lots smaller than one-half acre in the Mountain region. We approve general plan amendments that would increase residential density only if:
      • The proposed change is determined to be compatible in accordance with policies
      LU-2.1, 2.2, 2.3, and 4.5.
      • Adequate infrastructure and services are available concurrently.
      • The increase in density would not degrade existing

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    44. Policy LU-6.2 Large residential development in the Desert and Mountain regions

      We require a specific plan or Planned Development process for proposed residential development in the:
      • North or East Desert regions: when the proposed development would include one or more lots that is 2.5 acres or smaller and the overall development would cover 40 or more acres.
      • Mountain region: when the proposed development would include one or more lots that is 1 acre or smaller and the overall development would cover 40 or more acres.

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    45. Policy LU-6.3 Commercial amendments

      We will only approve Land Use Plan amendments that would introduce new commercial areas in the context of a comprehensive Land Use Plan amendment. We may waive this requirement when the proposed amended area abuts an existing or designated commercial area and the amount of land available for new commercial uses falls below 15 percent of the total commercially-designated land in the area.

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    46. Policy LU-6.4 Industrial amendments near schools and parks

      We approve Land Use Plan amendments for new industrial development only if they are at least one-half mile from an existing or planned public primary or secondary school or public park. We may waive this requirement for obsolete school or park sites or for industrial amendments submitted through a specific plan.

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    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps LU-1(A-E) Land Use Map (PDF | WEB)
    2. Policy Maps LU-2 General Boundaries (PDF | WEB)
    3. Policy Maps LU-3 Military Influence Overlay (PDF | WEB)
    4. Policy Tables Tables LU-1 to LU-3 (PDF only)
  • Goals
    1. Goal H-3 Housing and Neighborhood Quality

      Neighborhoods that protect the health, safety, and welfare of the community, and enhance public and private efforts in maintaining, reinvesting in, and upgrading the existing housing stock.

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    2. Goal V/H-1 Valley Region

      A diversity of housing and neighborhood improvement and preservation strategies that address the needs of residents living in county islands and spheres of influence

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    3. Goal M/H-1 Mountain Region

      A diversity of housing products that respects and complements the topography, character, and lifestyle of the Mountain Region

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    4. Goal D/H-1 Desert Region

      Residential land use patterns that enhance and preserve the rural character valued by the residents of the Desert Region.

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    Policies
    1. Policy H-1.1 Appropriate range of housing

      We encourage the production and location of a range of housing types, densities, and affordability levels in a manner that recognizes the unique characteristics, issues, and opportunities for each community.

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    2. Policy H-1.2 Concurrent infrastructure

      We support the integrated planning and provision of appropriate infrastructure (including water, sewer, and roadways) concurrent with and as a condition of residential development to create more livable communities.

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    3. Policy H-1.3 Quality multiple-family standards

      We enforce multiple-family residential development standards, amenity requirements, and other regulations to ensure the development of quality rental and homeownership opportunities for residents.

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    4. Policy H-1.5 Life-cycle costs

      We encourage energy-conservation techniques and upgrades in both the construction and rehabilitation of residential units that will reduce the life-cycle costs of housing.

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    5. Policy H-2.1 Development Code review

      We review the Development Code regularly for possible revisions that might unduly constrain the production or rehabilitation of residential development.

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    6. Policy H-2.2 Small lot sizes

      We continue to utilize Planned Development density bonus and density transfer provisions as described in the County Development Code to allow the development of lot sizes less than that normally required by residential land use districts.

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    7. Policy H-2.3 Flexible standards

      We allow flexibility in the application of residential and mixed-use development standards to gain benefits such as exceptional design quality, economic advantages, sustainability, or other benefits that would not otherwise be realized.

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    8. Policy H-2.4 Incentives

      We maintain incentives that can be offered when projects provide benefits to the community such as exceptional design quality, economic advantages, environmental sustainability, or other benefits that would not otherwise be realized.

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    9. Policy H-2.5 Certain and transparent process

      We maintain a residential development review process that provides certainty and transparency for project stakeholders and the public, yet allows for the appropriate review to facilitate quality housing development.

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    10. Policy H-2.6 Critical infrastructure

      We ensure that the efficient provision of critical infrastructure accompanies residential development and the building of complete communities, and ensure that the costs are fairly apportioned to the development community.

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    11. Policy H-3.1 Public Services, amenities, and safety

      We support the provision of adequate and fiscally sustainable public services, infrastructure, open space, non-motorized transportation routes, and public safety for neighborhoods in the unincorporated area.

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    12. Policy H-3.2 Code enforcement

      We support the timely removal of neighborhood blight through graffiti abatement, abandoned or inoperative automobile removal, trash and debris removal, housing repair, and other code enforcement efforts.

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    13. Policy H-3.3 Housing maintenance

      We enforce all applicable state and county health, safety, building, and zoning laws directed at housing and property maintenance to maintain healthful, sound, and attractive residential properties.

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    14. Policy H-3.4 Housing rehabilitation and improvement

      We encourage the rehabilitation, repair, and improvement of single-family, multiple family housing, and mobile homes and, if needed, the demolition of substandard housing through available loan and grant programs.

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    15. Policy H-3.5 Inspection of subsidized housing

      We inspect or facilitate the inspection of assisted multifamily rental housing, contract shelters, voucher hotels, and other housing projects on a regular basis to ensure that properties are regularly repaired and maintained in good condition.

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    16. Policy Policy H-3.6 Neighborhood improvements

      We support comprehensive neighborhood efforts to address housing conditions, property maintenance, infrastructure repair, public safety, landscaping, and other issues affecting the livability of neighborhoods

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    17. Policy V/H-1.1 Housing compatibility

      We encourage housing types and designs that are compatible with established land use patterns and the environment of the region, including single-family dwellings, mobile home parks/manufactured home land-leased communities, and apartments.

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    18. Policy V/H-1.3 Preferred housing types

      Within the Valley Region, we favor the following types of development: urban infill, single family detached (specifically adjacent to the Foothill Freeway corridors), clustered development with single-family appearance, and single-family detached on large lots.

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    19. Policy V/H-1.4 Pre-annexation coordination

      For unincorporated islands that are planned for eventual annexation, we work with cities to encourage and approve residential projects that are consistent with the general plans and design guidelines for annexing cities.

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    20. Policy M/H-1.1 Site design

      We regulate the density, mass, and height of residential development in hillside areas in order to reduce fire hazards, prevent erosion, preserve natural viewsheds, and maintain the forest character of the Mountain Region.

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    21. Policy Policy M/H-1.2 Building design

      We require architecture and outside facades of residential development that are in keeping with the mountain character; use natural woods, wood composite materials, and masonry as much as practicable.

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    22. Policy M/H-1.3 Single family building size

      We ensure that development standards for single family homes result in building sizes that are limited to size and scale that are compatible with existing development and the character of the Mountain Region.

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    23. Policy M/H-1.4 Protection of scenic qualities

      We use the planned development permit or other discretionary reviews to regulate the density and configuration of residential development along the shores of all mountain lakes or on slopes to protect their scenic qualities.

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    24. Policy M/H-1.5 Grouping or clustering

      We encourage the grouping or clustering of residential buildings where this will maximize the opportunity to preserve significant natural resources, natural beauty, or open space within the density limits of the underlying zone.

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    25. Policy D/H-1.1 Rural living pattern

      We encourage lower density residential development in the Desert Region by retaining Rural Living (RL) zoning in Community Planning Areas that are outside of city spheres of influence and removed from more urbanized community core areas.

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    26. Policy D/H-1.2 Rural-scale infrastructure

      We discourage urban-scale infrastructure improvements (e.g., such as curbs, gutters, and street lighting) for different communities in the Desert Region in cases where public health, safety, and welfare are not endangered.

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    27. Policy D/H-1.3 Waterwise landscaping

      Where multiple-family apartment projects are required to have landscaping, we encourage water-conserving, drought-tolerant, or native landscaping that is capable of surviving a desert climate.

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  • Policies
    1. Policy IU-1.1 Water supply

      We require that new development be connected to a public water system or a County-approved well to ensure a clean and resilient supply of potable water, even during cases of prolonged drought.

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    2. Policy IU-1.6 User fees

      For water systems operated by County Special Districts, we establish user fees that cover operation and maintenance costs and set aside adequate reserves for capital upgrades and improvements.

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    3. Policy IU-1.8 Groundwater management coordination

      We collaborate with watermasters, groundwater sustainability agencies, water purveyors, and other government agencies to ensure groundwater basins are being sustainably managed. We discourage new development when it would create or aggravate groundwater overdraft conditions, land subsidence, or other “undesirable results” as defined in the California Water Code. We require safe yields for groundwater sources covered by the Desert Groundwater Management Ordinance.

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    4. Policy IU-2.1 Minimum parcel size

      We require new lots smaller than one-half acre to be served by a sewer system. We may require sewer service for larger lot sizes depending on local soil and groundwater conditions, and the County’s Local Area Management Program.

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    5. Policy IU-2.2 User fees

      For wastewater systems operated by County Special Districts, we establish user fees that cover operation and maintenance costs and set aside adequate reserves for capital upgrades and improvements.

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    6. Policy IU-3.1 Regional flood control

      We maintain a regional flood control system and regularly evaluate the need for and implement upgrades based on changing land coverage and hydrologic conditions in order to manage and reduce flood risk. We require any public and private projects proposed anywhere in the county to address and mitigate any adverse impacts on the carrying capacity and stormwater velocity of regional stormwater drainage systems.

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    7. Policy IU-3.2 Local flood control

      We require new development to install and maintain stormwater management facilities that maintain predevelopment hydrology and hydraulic conditions.

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    8. Policy IU-3.4 Natural floodways

      We retain existing natural floodways and watercourses on County-controlled floodways, including natural channel bottoms, unless hardening and channelization is the only feasible way to manage flood risk. On floodways not controlled by the County, we encourage the retention of natural floodways and watercourses. Our priority is to reduce flood risk, but we also strive to protect wildlife corridors, prevent loss of critical habitat, and improve the amount and quality of surface water and groundwater resources.

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    9. Policy IU-3.5 Fair share requirements

      We require new development to pay its fair share of capital costs to maintain adequate capacity of the County’s regional flood control systems.

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    10. Policy IU-4.4 Landfill funding

      We require sufficient fees for use of County landfills to cover capital costs; ongoing operation, maintenance, and closure costs of existing landfills; and the costs and liabilities associated with closed landfills.

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    11. Policy IU-5.3 Underground facilities

      We encourage new and relocated power and communication facilities to be located underground when feasible, particularly in the Mountain and Desert regions.

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    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps IU-3 Wastewater Treatment Facilities (PDF | WEB)
  • Policies
    1. Policy TM-1.3 Freeways and highways

      We coordinate with Caltrans and regional transportation agencies and support the use of state, federal, and other agency funds to improve freeways and highways.

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    2. Policy TM-1.6 Paved roads

      For any new development for which paved roads are required, we require the developer to construct the roads and we require the establishment of a special funding and financing mechanism to pay for roadway operation, maintenance, and set-aside reserves.

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    3. Policy TM-1.7 Fair share contributions

      We require new development to pay its fair share contribution toward off-site transportation improvements.

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    4. Policy TM-2.2 Roadway improvements

      We require roadway improvements that reinforce the character of the area, such as curbs and gutters, sidewalks, landscaping, street lighting, and pedestrian and bicycle facilities. We require fewer improvements in rural areas and more improvements in urbanized areas, consistent with the Development Code. Additional standards may be required in municipal spheres of influence.

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    5. Policy TM-2.6 Access control

      We promote shared/central access points for direct access to roads in unincorporated areas to minimize vehicle conflict points and improve safety, especially access points for commercial uses on adjacent properties.

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    6. Policy TM-3.1 VMT reduction

      We promote new development that will reduce household and employment VMT relative to existing conditions.

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    7. Policy TM-3.2 Trip reduction strategies

      We support the implementation of transportation demand management techniques, mixed use strategies, and the placement of development in proximity to job and activity centers to reduce the number and length of vehicular trips.

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    8. Policy TM-4.4 Transit access for residents in unincorporated areas

      We support and work with local transit agencies to generate a public transportation system, with fixed routes and on-demand service, that provide residents of unincorporated areas with access to jobs, public services, shopping, and entertainment throughout the county.

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    9. Policy TM-4.6 Transit access to public service, health, and wellness

      In unincorporated areas where public transit is available, we prefer new public and behavioral health facilities, other public facilities and services, education facilities, grocery stores, and pharmacies to be located within one-half mile of a public transit stop. We encourage and plan to locate new County health and wellness facilities within one-half mile of a public transit stop in incorporated jurisdictions. We encourage public K-12 education and court facilities to be located within one-half mile of public transit.

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    10. Policy TM-4.10 Shared parking

      We support the use of shared parking facilities that provide safe and convenient pedestrian connectivity between adjacent uses.

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    11. Policy TM-4.11 Parking areas

      We require publicly accessible parking areas to ensure that pedestrians and bicyclists can safely access the site and onsite businesses from the public right-of-way.

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    12. Policy TM-5.7 Trucking-intensive businesses

      We require trucking-intensive businesses to pay their fair share of costs to build and maintain adequate roads.

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    13. Policy TM-6.2 Economic potential

      We seek to maximize the economic development potential of County airports.

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    14. Policy TM-6.4 Airport land use compatibility

      We require proposed development in unincorporated areas to be consistent with applicable airport master plans, airport safety review areas, and military air installation compatible use zones. We may support proposed development in the influence area of County airports only when they are consistent with applicable airport master plans.

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  • Policies
    1. Policy NR-1.1 Land use

      We promote compact and transit-oriented development countywide and regulate the types and locations of development in unincorporated areas to minimize vehicle miles traveled and greenhouse gas emissions.

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    2. Policy NR-1.5 Sensitive land uses

      We consider recommendations from the California Air Resources Board on the siting of new sensitive land uses and exposure to specific source categories.

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    3. Policy NR-3.1 Open space preservation

      We regulate land use and coordinate with public and nongovernmental agencies to preserve open space areas that protect natural resources, function as a buffer against natural hazards or between land uses, serve as a recreation or tourist destination, or are central to the identity of an unincorporated community.

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    4. Policy NR-3.2 Residential clustering

      We allow residential development to cluster housing units in order to reduce the consumption of undeveloped land, maximize the amount of open space, preserve natural resources, conform to natural topography/grade, and/or reduce exposure of structures to natural hazards.

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    5. Policy NR-3.4 Land exchange

      We coordinate with state and federal agencies to exchange publicly owned lands in order to provide additional areas for open space, recreation, and resource protection. We also request the right of first refusal on publicly owned lands made available for purchase to the public.

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    6. Policy NR-5.6 Mitigation banking

      We support the proactive assemblage of lands to protect biological resources and facilitate development through private or public mitigation banking. We require public and private conservation lands or mitigation banks to ensure that easement and fee title agreements provide funding methods sufficient to manage the land in perpetuity.

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    7. Policy NR-6.1 Mineral resource areas

      We prioritize the conservation of land area with mineral resources by prohibiting or discouraging development of land that would substantially preclude the future development of mining facilities in areas classified as Mineral Resource Zone (MRZ) 2a, 2b, or 3a.

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    8. Policy NR-7.1 Protection of agricultural land

      We protect economically viable and productive agricultural lands from the adverse effects of urban encroachment, particularly increased erosion and sedimentation, trespass, and non-agricultural land development.

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    9. Policy NR-7.2 Preservation of important farmlands

      We require project applicants seeking to develop 20 or more acres of farmland (classified as prime, of statewide importance, or unique farmland) to non-agricultural uses to prepare an agricultural resource evaluation prior to project approval. The evaluation shall use generally accepted methodologies to identify the potentially significant impact of the loss of agricultural land as well as the economic viability and sustainability of future agricultural use of the property, including long-term sustainability and economic viability of water resources. If the conversion is deemed significant, the County shall require mitigation at a 1:1 ratio of converted to preserved acreage through conservation easements, payment of its valuation equivalent if a fee mitigation program is established, or inclusion in a regional agricultural preservation program.

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    10. Policy NR-7.5 Agriculture on Rural Living and Open Space properties

      We permit small-scale, non-water-intensive, and incidental agricultural on properties designated for Rural Living. In the Oak Glen and Mentone community planning areas, we also permit commercial-scale agriculture on properties designated for Rural Living. In the Oak Glen and Mentone community planning areas and in the Crafton Hills, we also permit commercial-scale agriculture on privately-owned properties designated for Open Space.

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  • Policies
    1. Policy RE-5.8

      Discourage conversion of productive or viable prime agricultural lands to RE generation facilities.

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  • Policies
    1. Policy ED-1.3 Site aggregation

      We may assist in aggregating smaller lots and parcels to create more marketable and developable sites in employment focus areas.

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    2. Policy ED-1.4 Planned business park and industrial areas

      We prefer master planned approaches through specific and area plans for business park and industrial development and redevelopment. We facilitate master planned approaches in order to discourage incremental general plan amendments that introduce or expand business park or industrial development.

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    3. Policy ED-1.5 Mineral resources

      We support the extraction of mineral resources in unincorporated areas and the establishment and operation of supporting businesses throughout the county.

      GO TO POLICY
    4. Policy ED-1.6 Industrial redevelopment

      We facilitate and promote redevelopment in the industrial redevelopment focus areas to provide land and facilities for non-mining industrial development.

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    5. Policy ED-3.3 Site selection assistance

      We coordinate with agencies, incorporated cities and towns, and service providers to assist existing and prospective businesses in identifying and selecting sites and facilities countywide. We also assist businesses with permitting, licensing, incentives, and other regulatory requirements.

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    6. Policy ED-3.4 Site and facilities inventory

      We collaborate with real estate brokers, developers, municipalities, and building owners to maintain a countywide inventory of available sites and facilities for businesses.

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    7. Policy ED-3.5 Countywide marketing

      We regularly analyze economic and market conditions and trends to identify target economic sectors and actively market sites and facilities countywide to prospective businesses.

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  • Policies
    1. Policy HW-2.2 Land use compatibility for schools

      We prioritize the safety and security of public schools in unincorporated areas by minimizing incompatible land uses near instructional facilities. We encourage school districts to place new schools where existing and planned land uses are compatible.

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  • Goals
    1. Goal HZ-1 Natural Environmental Hazards

      Minimized risk of injury, loss of life, property damage, and economic and social disruption caused by natural environmental hazards and adaptation to potential changes in climate

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    Policies
    1. Policy HZ-1.1 New subdivisions in environmental hazard areas

      We require all lots and parcels created through new subdivisions to have sufficient buildable area outside of the following environmental hazard areas:

      • Flood: 100-year flood zone, dam/basin inundation area
      • Geologic: Alquist Priolo earthquake fault zone; County-identified fault zone; rockfall/debris-flow hazard area, existing and County-identified landslide area
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    2. Policy HZ-1.2 New development in environmental hazard areas

      We require all new development to be located outside of the environmental hazard areas listed below. For any lot or parcel that does not have sufficient buildable area outside of such hazard areas, we require adequate mitigation, including designs that allow occupants to shelter in place and to have sufficient time to evacuate during times of extreme weather and natural disasters.

      • Flood: 100-year flood zone, dam/basin inundation area
      • Geologic: Alquist Priolo earthquake fault zone; County-identified fault zone; rockfall/debris-flow hazard area, medium or high liquefaction area (low to high and localized), existing and County-identified landslide area, moderate to high landslide susceptibility area)
      • Fire: high or very high fire hazard severity zone
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    3. Policy HZ-1.3 Floodplain mapping

      We require any new lots or subdivisions partially in, and any new development partially or entirely in 100-year flood zones or 100-year flood awareness areas to provide detail floodplain mapping for 100- and 200-year storm events as part of the development approval process.

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    4. Policy HZ-1.4 500-year flood zone

      We may collaborate with property owners in the Valley region to establish funding and financing mechanisms to mitigate flood hazards in identified 500-year flood zones.

      GO TO POLICY
    5. Policy HZ-1.5 Existing properties in environmental hazard areas

      We encourage owners of existing properties in hazard areas to add design features that allow occupants to shelter in place and to have sufficient time to evacuate during times of extreme weather and natural disasters.

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    6. Policy HZ-1.6 Critical and essential facility location

      We require new critical and essential facilities to be located outside of hazard areas, whenever feasible.

      GO TO POLICY
    7. Policy HZ-1.8 Wind erosion hazards

      We require new development in medium-high or high wind erosion hazard areas to minimize the effects of wind-blown soil through building and site design features such as fencing, surface treatment or pavement, attenuation or wind barriers, architectural features, building materials, and drought resistant landscaping.

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    8. Policy HZ-1.9 Hazard areas maintained as open space

      We minimize risk associated with flood, geologic, and fire hazard zones or areas by encouraging such areas to be preserved and maintained as open space.

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    9. Policy HZ-1.10 Energy independence

      We encourage new residential development to include rooftop solar energy systems and battery storage systems that can provide backup electrical service during temporary power outages.

      GO TO POLICY
    10. Policy HZ-1.11 Energy efficiency retrofits

      We encourage owners of existing residential and commercial properties to retrofit the walls, doors, windows, ceilings, roofs, ductwork, and other elements of their building envelopes, in order to improve energy efficiency and better protect occupants from extreme temperatures.

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    11. Policy HZ-2.1 Hazardous waste facilities

      We regulate and buffer hazardous waste facilities to protect public health and avoid impacts on the natural environment.

      GO TO POLICY
    12. Policy HZ-2.8 Proximity to noise generating uses

      We limit or restrict new noise sensitive land uses in proximity to existing conforming noise generating uses and planned industrial areas.

      GO TO POLICY
    13. Policy HZ-2.9 Control sound at the source

      We prioritize noise mitigation measures that control sound at the source before buffers, soundwalls, and other perimeter measures.

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    14. Policy HZ-2.10 Agricultural operations

      We require new development adjacent to existing conforming agricultural operations to provide adequate buffers to reduce the exposure of new development to operational noise, odor, and the storage or application of pesticides or other hazardous materials.

      GO TO POLICY
    15. Policy HZ-3.5 Hazardous waste facilities

      We do not permit new hazardous waste facilities to be developed in unincorporated environmental justice focus areas.

      GO TO POLICY
    16. Policy HZ-3.15 Food access

      We increase access to healthy food in underserved areas by promoting local food production, community gardens, and urban farms in agricultural zoning districts or on vacant or underutilized lands. We also encourage existing and new small grocery or convenience stores to sell fresh foods in underserved areas. We require the County Healthy Communities Program to prioritize environmental justice communities for technical assistance and grant making, and ensure that residents of environmental justice communities are provided educational materials related to food assistance programs, healthy eating habits and food choices.

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    17. Policy HZ- 3.16 Notification

      We notify the public through the County website, mail, and other means when applications are accepted for conditional use permits, changes in zoning, and Policy Plan amendments in or adjacent to environmental justice focus areas. We prepare public notices in the predominant language(s) spoken in the communities containing environmental justice focus areas.

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    1. FOCUS STATEMENT C - Facilitate the provision of sewer infrastructure and sewage treatment capacity to accommodate additional residential and business development in areas of Bloomington planned for more intense development.
      Action Statement C.1

      3.1 Evaluate potential sewer infrastructure needs

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement C.2

      3.2 Develop sewer improvement community consensus and strategy

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT D - Evaluate the feasibility and potential effectiveness of establishing truck routes to lessen traffic congestion and to reduce damage to roadways, and, if feasible, adopt designated truck routes, establish a program to upgrade truck route roadways, and prohibit truck traffic on non-truck route roads.
      Action Statement D.1

      4.1 Define the challenge and intended outcomes of a truck route plan

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement D.2

      4.2 Prepare a truck route plan

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement D.3

      4.3 Develop truck route community consensus and strategy

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement D.4

      4.4 Establish final truck routes with collaboration and approval by Department of Public Works, County Board of Supervisors, and California Highway Patrol

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement D.5

      4.5 Plan and Construct Improvements (Department of Public Works)

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    3. FOCUS STATEMENT E - Generate revenue to offset impacts of new development in Bloomington by establishing new development impact fees and financing districts, and also restricting the use of that revenue to improvements in Bloomington
      Action Statement E.1

      5.1 Present a summary of development impact fee and financing districts

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement E.2

      5.2 Community Development and Housing Department conducts nexus studies and drafts ordinance

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement E.3

      5.3 Prepare and adopt a development impact fee ordinance

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement E.4

      5.4 Conduct a financing districts community workshop

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Improve the quality of our built environment to enhance community health, safety, neighborhood character, and the image of our business corridors.
      Action Statement A.4

      Adopt development standards and public infrastructure in commercial areas appropriate for a rural mountain community.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement A.5

      Establish and implement a façade and sign improvement program for existing and future businesses.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Improve housing options for Baker residents
      Action Statement A.1

      Coordinate with San Bernardino County Land Use Services on a community proposal to study subdivision and zoning requirements in Baker to better allow for a diverse and affordable housing stock.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Grow the community through attracting and maintaining a skilled workforce
      Action Statement B.2

      Collaborate with San Bernardino County Land Use Services to expand the industrial zones in Baker.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.6

      Identify and advertise commercial sites to local developers to encourage development of hotel(s) in Baker.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Protect the community’s treasures for years to come.
      Action Statement A.5

      Advocate for changes in development standards requiring new development to set aside land for open space and/or agricultural use.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Enhance pedestrian safety and mobility along Mentone Boulevard (Highway 38).
      Action Statement B.1

      Advocate and collaborate with Caltrans to develop a master plan for signage, striping, and lighting along Highway 38 that enhances public safety and pedestrian connectivity.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT D - Clean up the community
      Action Statement D.3

      Focus signage and education activities on community stewardship for tourists and visitors.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Provide a unified downtown area that is active and thriving
      Action Statement A.1

      Provide additional public amenities such as restrooms, seating areas, open space areas, and lighted pedestrian paths, walkways, and crosswalks in the Lake Drive area.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement A.6

      Collaborate with the County to establish a consistent/compatible design theme for the downtown/business district areas.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT C - Create affordable outdoor recreation activities that capitalize on the natural environment, attract visitors, and provide entertainment for residents while also reducing the associated impacts to the communities
      Action Statement C.2

      Investigate opportunities to establish designated sledding areas with parking to avoid visitors establishing undesignated sledding and parking areas.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Preserve the desert ecosystem, its natural beauty, and the community’s harmonious relationship with the environment
      Action Statement A.5

      Promote smart, sustainable, low-impact growth and development.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT C - Become a model gateway community to Joshua Tree National Park
      Action Statement C.2

      Establish a plan to create a vibrant downtown with more restaurants, cafes, bakeries, craft shops, galleries, and the like.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement C.3

      Coordinate with business and property owners to develop a series of guidelines for wayfinding and advertising signage that embraces the community’s design vision while providing direction and information to both residents and visitors.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement C.4

      Establish a downtown business improvement district (BID), or similar financing mechanism, to assist in developing improvements to the gateway.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement C.10

      Locate open spaces such as courts, plazas, and park areas near and around businesses to encourage visitors to stop in the core downtown/gateway area.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    3. FOCUS STATEMENT D - Grow the local economy in a manner consistent with the rural desert character
      Action Statement D.2

      Encourage the sustainable development of lodging for Joshua Tree National Park visitors and advocate for responsible short-term rental (e.g., Airbnb) operations.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Clean up Dagget
      Action Statement A.3

      Establish a permanent dump site.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT C - Provide more community activities
      Action Statement C.3

      Partner with the BLM to showcase natural resources and wildlife in the area.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Increase recreational opportunities to enhance the quality of life in Muscoy
      Action Statement A.1

      Conduct a community-based asset inventory to identify physical assets like vacant lots and spaces to be used for parks, open spaces, and community activities.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement A.2

      Coordinate with nonprofits, local business, and institutional partners to identify resources to purchase adjacent vacant lots and convert them to parks.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement A.3

      Establish joint-use agreements with Muscoy Elementary School and the PAL Center for the community to utilize existing soccer fields and green spaces.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Encourage community involvement in civic beautification and maintaining the community’s rural character
      Action Statement B.1

      Establish a community cleanup program utilizing local youth organizations to clean up trash, debris, and weeds in the Muscoy community at least four times a year.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.3

      Encourage safe animal keeping through educational programs and partnerships.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    3. FOCUS STATEMENT C - Improve public and equestrian safety within Muscoy
      Action Statement C.1

      Increase participation in the neighborhood watch program throughout the community.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement C.4

      Establish a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement C.5

      Identify existing and potential horse and pedestrian trails with a community-sponsored wayfinding program.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Create economic development opportunities
      Action Statement A.2

      Collaborate with San Bernardino County to take advantage of the future planned High Desert Corridor to capitalize on development opportunities presented from increased access to El Mirage.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Improve the visibility and access to Helendale from Route 66 and Interstate 15
      Action Statement B.1

      Coordinate with the County to design a corridor plan for National Trails Highway that improves aesthetics, provides wayfinding and addresses safety from Oro Grande through Helendale.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT D - Attract new development to Helendale while maintaining the existing community character and rural desert lifestyle.
      Action Statement D.3

      Establish a local Design Committee to provide advisory input to the County on land development matters.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement D.4

      Develop stronger coordination on planning between the Silver Lakes HOA, Helendale Community Services District and the County.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    3. FOCUS STATEMENT E - Improve open space and recreational opportunities for Helendale residents
      Action Statement E.2

      Establish more walking and multi-use trails within the community including areas such as the wash and the Mojave River.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement E.4

      Create a little league park and practice fields.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement E.7

      Enhance the existing Dog Park.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Improve quality of life concerns
      Action Statement A.4

      Advocate to the HOA to develop the RV and boat parking/storage facilities as originally planned.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Maintain the rural character of the community
      Action Statement A.2

      Encourage the County to adopt rural desert development standards more befitting the high desert community and in keeping with Lucerne Valley’s rural character and sense of openness.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement A.3

      Partner with organizations and land trusts to protect and conserve Lucerne Valley’s unique natural desert habitats and wildlife corridors, protect public access to locally-, state-, or federally designated open space or resource conservation areas, and to maintain the balance between the human and natural communities to maintain a functioning desert/mountain transitional ecosystem.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Promote responsible and sustainable development consistent with Lucerne Valley’s rural character
      Action Statement B.1

      Establish community-based design guidelines that encourage a common rural design theme for commercial building façades to assist designers in meeting community expectations and to create a cohesive architectural style within the business district.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.2

      IN PROCESS: Promote Lucerne Valley as an ideal location for the development of a senior living facility, in particular, close to the Lucerne Valley Senior Center.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.3

      IN PROCESS: Advocate for limiting industrial development to only those areas adjacent to the existing railroad tracks in southeastern Lucerne Valley.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    3. FOCUS STATEMENT E - Improve the delivery of essential services such as police and fire to the community
      Action Statement E.2

      NEEDS FUNDING: Conduct a community inventory of properties that may be in need of code enforcement action and meet regularly with County Code Enforcement to point out issues and to determine if there are community-based solutions, in particular, with regard to enforcement of property maintenance standards and illegal dumping.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Reduce the impacts associated with seasonal visitors and tourist activities
      Action Statement B.2

      Investigate opportunities to establish designated sledding areas with parking to avoid visitors establishing undesignated sledding and parking areas.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.3

      Provide signage, maps, and other informational materials that identify trails and amenities.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.5

      Advocate with the National Forest Service (NFS) to provide snow play/recreation areas and parking that does not impact the environment.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.6

      Establish a strategy/implementation plan for large events that proactively considers and responds to challenges associated with a large influx of visitors at one time.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.7

      Provide centralized parking with shuttles and pedestrian paths that connect key commercial recreational activity areas to reduce vehicle use and trips.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT C - Improve mobility and reduce vehicle trips through the development of multi-purpose trails that connect key nodes/activity areas within and between the communities
      Action Statement C.1

      IN PROCESS: Construct trails for all users that connect neighborhoods with commercial/business areas and key activity areas, such as schools, parks, and community centers.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement C.2

      IN PROCESS: Identify opportunities to extend existing trails or modify existing trails to serve multiple uses.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    3. FOCUS STATEMENT E - Improve the appearance of the community
      Action Statement E.5

      Establish a façade and sign improvement program.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Preserve and enhance the unique environmental features of the Lake Arrowhead Communities and surrounding areas
      Action Statement A.2

      Identify incentives for landowners to maintain undeveloped property as open space.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT F - Improve resources to support seasonal visitors and tourist activities in the Lake Arrowhead communities
      Action Statement F.2

      Investigate opportunities to establish designated sledding areas with parking to avoid visitors establishing quasi-sledding and parking areas.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    3. FOCUS STATEMENT G - Improve public safety within the Lake Arrowhead communities
      Action Statement G.5

      Design and promote education materials to help residents understand what constitutes potential code violations and how to report illegal dumping activities.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Increase water availability and accessibility
      Action Statement A.3

      Establish a map of fire-fighting water resources.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT D - Preserve small alpine community (character, history, aesthetics)
      Action Statement D.1

      Host a property owners meeting, with representatives from San Bernardino County Land Use Services, to discuss local aesthetic qualities including architectural styles, building materials, and paint colors and consider regulation through formation of a Homeowners Association with covenants, codes, and restrictions or adoption of development standards.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement D.3

      Work with San Bernardino County Land Use Services to develop a program to promote business sign design guidelines that reflect the community’s desired aesthetic or regulates business signage through design standards that address sign types, placement, lighting, materials, colors, and historic or landmark signage.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT C - Provide for a stable economy focusing on economic development, eco-tourism and Route 66 tourism
      Action Statement C.5

      Coordinate a comprehensive review of zoning and circulation.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT E - Improve public infrastructure
      Action Statement E.6

      Preserve rural values in public infrastructure projects.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    3. FOCUS STATEMENT F - Maintain a clean community.
      Action Statement F.1

      Establish a community code education program, with a focus on local blight.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Encourage commercial and light industrial uses in Phelan Piñon Hills.
      Action Statement B.2

      Encourage more retail and service uses within the existing commercial zones by regularly updating the San Bernardino County Economic Development Agency (EDA) on local available sites.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT C - Preserve the historic treasures within the community for future generations
      Action Statement C.2

      Construct community monuments along historic trails and within the community that can be sponsored by businesses and individuals.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Improve the quality of the community to enhance the quality of life for citizens
      Action Statement A.6

      Create a community park that is fun for all ages.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Clean up the community
      Action Statement A.1

      Design community themed murals for Community Service District buildings and attractions.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Restore, preserve, and enhance the rural characteristics of Homestead Valley
      Action Statement A.2

      Collaborate with San Bernardino County Land Use Services to develop and adopt design guidelines that reflect the unique characteristics of the community, and will lead to residential and nonresidential buildings that are compatible to the architectural style within Homestead Valley.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement A.4

      IN PROCESS: Collaborate with San Bernardino County Land Use Services as it develops a draft short-term rental ordinance for the County.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement A.5

      Advocate to San Bernardino County Land Use Services to review the Rural Residential zoning in Homestead Valley, and revise the zoning designation as needed to be more responsive to community values and priorities, including preventing large-scale industrial and solar developments.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Preserve the historic western themed rural lifestyle
      Action Statement A.6

      Protect residential equestrian uses that are part of the Old West heritage.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Promote balanced growth and a viable Town Center around Mane Street.
      Action Statement B.1

      Advocate with the County to establish a commercial zoning overlay on Mane Street that restricts big box retail, encourages neighborhood commercial scale retail and lodging, and establishes flexibility for locally-grown businesses.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN