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  • Goals
    1. Goal LU-2 Land Use Mix and Compatibility

      An arrangement of land uses that balances the lifestyle of existing residents, the needs of future generations, opportunities for commercial and industrial development, and the value of the natural environment.

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    2. Goal LU-4 Community Design

      Preservation and enhancement of unique community identities and their relationship with the natural environment

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    Policies
    1. Policy LU-2.1 Compatibility with existing uses

      We require that new development is located, scaled, buffered, and designed to minimize negative impacts on existing conforming uses and adjacent neighborhoods. We also require that new residential developments are located, scaled, buffered, and designed so as to not hinder the viability and continuity of existing conforming nonresidential development.

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    2. Policy LU-2.2 Compatibility with planned uses

      We require that new residential development is located, scaled, buffered, and designed to minimize negative impacts both on and from adjacent areas designated for nonresidential land uses.

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    3. Policy LU-2.3 Compatibility with natural environment

      We require that new development is located, scaled, buffered, and designed for compatibility with the surrounding natural environment and biodiversity.

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    4. Policy LU-2.4 Land Use Map consistency

      We consider proposed development that is consistent with the Land Use Map (i.e., it does not require a change in Land Use Category), to be generally compatible and consistent with surrounding land uses and a community’s identity. Additional site, building, and landscape design treatment, per other policies in the Policy Plan and development standards in the Development Code, may be required to maximize compatibility with surrounding land uses and community identity.

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    5. Policy LU-2.5 Hillside preservation

      We require that new development in sloping hillside areas preserve the natural character of the surrounding environment and does not further exacerbate natural hazards or erosion.

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    6. Policy LU-2.6 Coordination with adjacent entities

      We require that new and amended development projects notify and coordinate with adjacent local, state, and federal entities to maximize land use compatibility, inform future planning and implementation, and realize mutually beneficial outcomes.

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    7. Policy LU-2.7 Countywide jobs-housing balance

      We prioritize growth that furthers a countywide balance of jobs and housing to reduce vehicle miles traveled, increase job opportunities and household income, and improve quality of life. We also strive for growth that furthers a balance of jobs and housing in the North Desert region and the Valley region.

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    8. Policy LU-2.8 Rural lifestyle in the Mountain/Desert regions

      We intend that new residential development in the unincorporated Mountain and Desert regions offer a lower intensity lifestyle that complements the suburban and urban densities in incorporated cities and towns to provide a range of lifestyle options. Master planned communities in unincorporated Mountain/Desert regions may provide a broader range of lifestyles and densities.

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    9. Policy LU-2.9 Suburban lifestyles in the Valley region

      We intend that new residential development in the unincorporated Valley region offer a suburban lifestyle that is similar to that of adjacent cities.

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    10. Policy LU-2.10 Unincorporated commercial development

      We intend that new commercial development in the unincorporated areas serve unincorporated residential areas, tourists, and/or freeway travelers. We encourage new commercial development to be concentrated to enhance pedestrian circulation and reduce vehicular congestion and vehicle miles traveled, with new development directed into existing centralized areas when possible.

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    11. Policy LU-2.11 Office and industrial development in the Mountain/Desert regions

      We allow new office and industrial uses in unincorporated Mountain/Desert regions in order to meet the service, employment, and support needs of the unincorporated areas.

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    12. Policy LU-2.12 Office and industrial development in the Valley region

      We encourage office and industrial uses in the unincorporated Valley region in order to promote a countywide jobs-housing balance.

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    13. Policy LU-2.13 Short-term private home rentals

      We enforce appropriate operation standards, maintenance standards, and permitting procedures for the establishment and maintenance of short-term private home rentals in the unincorporated areas.

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    14. Policy LU-2.14 Contiguous land administration

      We support the consolidation of disconnected land areas under public ownership or administration to increase financial and environmental value, streamline the management of land and resources, and establish more complete and effective transition areas or buffers. Such consolidation may include transfer of title of property among public entities and the purchase or swapping of private property voluntarily sold when the consolidation is fiscally neutral or beneficial to the County.

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    15. Policy LU-3.2 Annexations with planned incompatible land uses

      We oppose annexations when future planned land uses for the proposed annexation area would be incompatible with the remaining adjacent unincorporated lands.

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    16. Policy LU-3.3 City/town standards in SOIs

      Upon negotiation with individual jurisdictions, we may require new development in unincorporated municipal sphere of influence areas to apply the improvement standards for roads and sidewalks of the incorporated jurisdiction.

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    17. Policy LU-4.1 Context-sensitive design in the Mountain/Desert regions

      We require new development to employ site and building design techniques and use building materials that reflect the natural mountain or desert environment and preserve scenic resources.

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    18. Policy LU-4.4 Natural topography in the Mountain region

      We require new development in the Mountain region to retain natural topography and minimize grading unless it is necessary to reduce exposure to natural hazards.

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    19. Policy LU-4.5 Community identity

      We require that new development be consistent with and reinforce the physical and historical character and identity of our unincorporated communities, as described in Table LU-3 and in the values section of Community Action Guides. In addition, we consider the aspirations section of Community Action Guides in our review of new development.

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    20. Policy LU-4.6 Adaptive reuse

      We encourage the rehabilitation, adaptive reuse, and revitalization of existing structures to preserve and celebrate the unique sense of place, identity, and history of our communities.

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    21. Policy LU-4.7 Dark skies

      We minimize light pollution and glare to preserve views of the night sky, particularly in the Mountain and Desert regions where dark skies are fundamentally connected to community identities and local economies. We also promote the preservation of dark skies to assist the military in testing, training, and operations.

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    22. Policy LU-4.11 Businesses in Joshua Tree

      We prohibit the establishment of franchise businesses in the commercial focus area/franchise-restricted in Joshua Tree to preserve the unique community character and its value as a year-round, world renowned tourist destination.

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    23. Policy LU-5.1 Military land use compatibility

      We coordinate with military stakeholders to ensure compatible land uses in areas where military operations on or off installations could affect public health and safety, or where civilian activities could have an impact on current or future military operations. We will coordinate with military stakeholders to resolve existing land use conflicts and protect public safety in the Military Influence Overlay.

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    24. Policy LU-5.2 Military Influence Overlay

      We require conditional use permits for projects within the Military Influence Overlay that could penetrate the defined floor elevation of the military airspace, or that could encroach upon military operations. We consider how development of roads and infrastructure within the Military Influence Overlay will promote growth that might lead to incompatible land use.

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    25. Policy LU-5.3 Open space for military activity and buffering

      We engage with military installations to preserve open space areas to facilitate military training and operations and to buffer civilian areas from military activity.

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    26. Policy LU-5.4 Ranged activities and projects

      We require activities and projects that can exert impacts beyond project boundaries, such as renewable energy facilities, wireless communication systems, and unmanned aircraft systems, to coordinate with military installations in preliminary planning and throughout the project’s construction stages and long-term operation.

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    27. Policy LU-6.4 Industrial amendments near schools and parks

      We approve Land Use Plan amendments for new industrial development only if they are at least one-half mile from an existing or planned public primary or secondary school or public park. We may waive this requirement for obsolete school or park sites or for industrial amendments submitted through a specific plan.

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    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps LU-1(A-E) Land Use Map (PDF | WEB)
    2. Policy Maps LU-3 Military Influence Overlay (PDF | WEB)
    3. Policy Tables Tables LU-1 to LU-3 (PDF only)
  • Goals
    1. Goal V/H-1 Valley Region

      A diversity of housing and neighborhood improvement and preservation strategies that address the needs of residents living in county islands and spheres of influence

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    2. Goal M/H-1 Mountain Region

      A diversity of housing products that respects and complements the topography, character, and lifestyle of the Mountain Region

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    3. Goal D/H-1 Desert Region

      Residential land use patterns that enhance and preserve the rural character valued by the residents of the Desert Region.

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    Policies
    1. Policy H-1.1 Appropriate range of housing

      We encourage the production and location of a range of housing types, densities, and affordability levels in a manner that recognizes the unique characteristics, issues, and opportunities for each community.

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    2. Policy H-1.2 Concurrent infrastructure

      We support the integrated planning and provision of appropriate infrastructure (including water, sewer, and roadways) concurrent with and as a condition of residential development to create more livable communities.

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    3. Policy V/H-1.1 Housing compatibility

      We encourage housing types and designs that are compatible with established land use patterns and the environment of the region, including single-family dwellings, mobile home parks/manufactured home land-leased communities, and apartments.

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    4. Policy V/H-1.3 Preferred housing types

      Within the Valley Region, we favor the following types of development: urban infill, single family detached (specifically adjacent to the Foothill Freeway corridors), clustered development with single-family appearance, and single-family detached on large lots.

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    5. Policy V/H-1.4 Pre-annexation coordination

      For unincorporated islands that are planned for eventual annexation, we work with cities to encourage and approve residential projects that are consistent with the general plans and design guidelines for annexing cities.

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    6. Policy M/H-1.1 Site design

      We regulate the density, mass, and height of residential development in hillside areas in order to reduce fire hazards, prevent erosion, preserve natural viewsheds, and maintain the forest character of the Mountain Region.

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    7. Policy Policy M/H-1.2 Building design

      We require architecture and outside facades of residential development that are in keeping with the mountain character; use natural woods, wood composite materials, and masonry as much as practicable.

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    8. Policy M/H-1.3 Single family building size

      We ensure that development standards for single family homes result in building sizes that are limited to size and scale that are compatible with existing development and the character of the Mountain Region.

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    9. Policy M/H-1.4 Protection of scenic qualities

      We use the planned development permit or other discretionary reviews to regulate the density and configuration of residential development along the shores of all mountain lakes or on slopes to protect their scenic qualities.

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    10. Policy M/H-1.5 Grouping or clustering

      We encourage the grouping or clustering of residential buildings where this will maximize the opportunity to preserve significant natural resources, natural beauty, or open space within the density limits of the underlying zone.

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    11. Policy D/H-1.1 Rural living pattern

      We encourage lower density residential development in the Desert Region by retaining Rural Living (RL) zoning in Community Planning Areas that are outside of city spheres of influence and removed from more urbanized community core areas.

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  • Policies
    1. Policy IU-1.8 Groundwater management coordination

      We collaborate with watermasters, groundwater sustainability agencies, water purveyors, and other government agencies to ensure groundwater basins are being sustainably managed. We discourage new development when it would create or aggravate groundwater overdraft conditions, land subsidence, or other “undesirable results” as defined in the California Water Code. We require safe yields for groundwater sources covered by the Desert Groundwater Management Ordinance.

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    2. Policy IU-5.5 Energy and fuel facilities

      We encourage the development and upgrade of energy and regional fuel facilities in areas that do not pose significant environmental or public health and safety hazards, and in a manner that is compatible with military operations and local community identity.

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  • Policies
    1. Policy TM-6.4 Airport land use compatibility

      We require proposed development in unincorporated areas to be consistent with applicable airport master plans, airport safety review areas, and military air installation compatible use zones. We may support proposed development in the influence area of County airports only when they are consistent with applicable airport master plans.

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  • Policies
    1. Policy NR-1.1 Land use

      We promote compact and transit-oriented development countywide and regulate the types and locations of development in unincorporated areas to minimize vehicle miles traveled and greenhouse gas emissions.

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    2. Policy NR-1.5 Sensitive land uses

      We consider recommendations from the California Air Resources Board on the siting of new sensitive land uses and exposure to specific source categories.

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    3. Policy NR-3.1 Open space preservation

      We regulate land use and coordinate with public and nongovernmental agencies to preserve open space areas that protect natural resources, function as a buffer against natural hazards or between land uses, serve as a recreation or tourist destination, or are central to the identity of an unincorporated community.

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    4. Policy NR-3.11 Off-highway vehicle areas

      In areas under the County’s land use authority, we require new or expansion of existing commercial off-highway vehicle (OHV) areas to be situated and buffered to minimize effects on nearby residential uses, military activity, and environmentally sensitive areas.

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    5. Policy NR-4.1 Preservation of scenic resources

      We consider the location and scale of development to preserve regionally significant scenic vistas and natural features, including prominent hillsides, ridgelines, dominant landforms, and reservoirs.

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    6. Policy NR-7.5 Agriculture on Rural Living and Open Space properties

      We permit small-scale, non-water-intensive, and incidental agricultural on properties designated for Rural Living. In the Oak Glen and Mentone community planning areas, we also permit commercial-scale agriculture on properties designated for Rural Living. In the Oak Glen and Mentone community planning areas and in the Crafton Hills, we also permit commercial-scale agriculture on privately-owned properties designated for Open Space.

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  • Goals
    1. Goal RE-5 Siting

      Renewable energy facilities will be located in areas that meet County standards, local values, community needs and environmental and cultural resource protection priorities

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    2. Goal RE-6 County Government Systems

      County regulatory systems will ensure that renewable energy facilities are designed, sited, developed, operated and decommissioned in ways compatible with our communities, natural environment, and applicable environmental and cultural resource protection laws

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    Policies
    1. Policy RE-3.4

      Require renewable energy facilities developed in spheres of influence of incorporated cities to be compatible and consistent with standards of the sphere cities.

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    2. Policy RE-4.1

      Apply standards to the design, siting, and operation of all renewable energy facilities that protect the environment, including sensitive biological resources, air quality, water supply and quality, cultural, archaeological, paleontological and scenic resources.

      • RE 4 .1.1: Consult with Native American tribes in the identification, evaluation, and treatment of cultural resources and in the preparation and implementation of measures required to identify, evaluate, protect, and manage cultural resources.
      • RE 4.1.2: RE development applications shall be subject to thorough environmental review, including consideration of water consumption, before being permitted.
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    3. Policy RE-4.2

      Ensure that renewable energy facilities do not disrupt, degrade, or alter the local hydrology and hydrogeology.

      • RE 4.2.1: Require a groundwater impact assessment that evaluates the short and long-term impacts to groundwater usage.
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    4. Policy RE-4.3

      Require construction and operation of all renewable energy facilities to minimize negative effects and optimize benefits to unincorporated communities.

      • RE 4.3.1: Define measures required to minimize ground disturbance, soil erosion, flooding, and blowing of sand and dust, with appropriate enforcement mechanisms in the Development Code.
      • RE 4.3.2: Require operators to track and report energy production and other benefits cited in a project proposal, in addition to tracking efforts to avoid and minimize negative impacts.
      • RE 4.3.3: Give preference to the utilization of existing infrastructure to minimize the need for additional transmission development.
      • RE 4.3.4: Establish inspection protocols and programs to ensure that RE facilities are constructed, operated, and eventually decommissioned consistent with the requirements of the San Bernardino County Code, and in a manner that will not be detrimental to the public health, safety, or welfare.
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    5. Policy RE-4.4

      Encourage siting, construction and screening of RE generation facilities to avoid, minimize or mitigate significant changes to the visual environment including minimizing light and glare.

      • RE 4.4.1: Reduce visual impacts through a combination of minimized reflective surfaces, context sensitive color treatments, nature-oriented geometry, minimized vegetation clearing under and around arrays, conservation of pre-existing native plants, replanting of native plants as appropriate, maintenance of natural landscapes around the edges of facility complexes, and lighting design to minimize night-sky impacts, including attraction of and impact to nocturnal migratory birds
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    6. Policy RE-4.7

      RE project site selection and site design shall be guided by the following priorities relative to habitat conservation and mitigation:

      1. Avoid sensitive habitat, including wildlife corridors, during site selection and project design.
      2. Where necessary and feasible, conduct mitigation on-site.
      3. When on-site habitat mitigation is not possible or adequate, establish mitigation off-site in an area designated for habitat conservation.
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    7. Policy RE-4.10

      Prohibit utility-oriented RE project development on sites that would create adverse impacts on the quality of life or economic development opportunities in existing unincorporated communities.

      • RE 4.10.1: Prohibit development of utility-oriented RE projects in the Rural Living land use districts throughout the County.
      • RE 4.10.2: Prohibit development of utility-oriented RE projects within the boundaries of existing community plans, which at the time of adoption of this Element are the Bloomington, Muscoy, Bear Valley, Crest Forest, Hilltop, Lake Arrowhead, Lytle Creek, Oak Glen, Homestead Valley, Joshua Tree, Lucerne Valley, Morongo Valley, Oak Hills and Phelan/Pinon Hills Community Plans.
      • RE 4.10.3: Establish exclusion areas in the Development Code regulations for renewable energy development, beginning with the prohibitions in Policies 4.10.1 and 4.10.2 and provide for additional exclusion areas, such as new community plan areas, to be designated by amendment to the Development Code.
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    8. Policy RE-5.1

      Encourage the siting of RE generation facilities on disturbed or degraded sites in proximity to necessary transmission infrastructure.

      • RE 5.1.1: Community-oriented RE generation facility sites may be less disturbed or degraded, but should contribute direct benefits to the communities they are intended to serve.
      • RE 5.1.2: Siting of community-oriented and utility-oriented RE generation facilities will conform to applicable standards set forth in the Development Code.
      • RE 5.1.3: Encourage new subdivision applications to set aside an area of land capable of supporting neighborhood-oriented renewable energy generation.
      • RE 5.1.4: Encourage micro-grids supported by energy storage and innovative technologies for incorporation into neighborhood- and community-scale renewable energy projects.
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    9. Policy RE-5.2

      Utility- oriented RE generation projects on private land in the unincorporated County will be limited to the site-type below, in addition to meeting criteria established herein and in the Development Code:

      i. Private lands adjacent to the federal Development Focus Areas supported by the Board of Supervisors that meet siting criteria and development standards
      ii. Waste Disposal Sites
      iii. Mining Sites (operating and reclaimed)
      iv. Fallow, degraded and unviable agricultural lands
      v. Airports (existing and abandoned or adaptively re-used)
      vi. Brownfields
      vii. California Department of Toxic Substance Control Cleanup Program Sites
      viii. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Sites
      ix. Sites within or adjacent to electric transmission and utility distribution corridors
      x. Existing energy generation sites
      xi. Industrial zones proven to not conflict with economic development needs
      xii. Other sites proven by a detailed suitability analysis to reflect the significantly disturbed nature or conditions of those listed above

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    10. Policy RE-5.3

      Collaborate with utilities and RE generation facility developers to encourage collocation of transmission and intertie facilities.

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    11. Policy RE-5.4

      Utility-oriented RE generation facilities will be required to meet a higher standard of evaluation for appropriate site selection due to its size and distance from population centers.

      • RE 5.4.1: Establish a two-step application process for utility-oriented RE generation that evaluates site selection early in the planning process.
      • RE 5.4.2: Encourage utility-oriented RE generation to occur in the five DRECP Development Focus Areas (DFAs) that were supported by the Board of Supervisors on February 17, 2016, Resolution No. 2016-20 and on adjacent private lands.
      • RE 5.4.3: Direct utility-oriented RE generation facilities that may require transmission upgrades to seek sites within existing transmission corridors.
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    12. Policy RE-5.5

      Coordinate with the Department of Defense on the siting of RE generation facilities in a manner that will not significantly impact military operations in the unincorporated county.

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    13. Policy RE-5.7

      Support renewable energy projects that are compatible with protection of the scenic and recreational assets that define San Bernardino County for its residents and make it a destination for tourists.

      • RE 5.7.1: Site RE generation facilities in a manner that will avoid, minimize or substantially mitigate adverse impacts to sensitive habitats, cultural resources, surrounding land uses, and scenic viewsheds
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    14. Policy RE-5.9

      Collaborate with utilities, the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to plan for RE generation facilities to be located on public lands, apart from existing unincorporated communities.

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  • Policies
    1. Policy ED-1.4 Planned business park and industrial areas

      We prefer master planned approaches through specific and area plans for business park and industrial development and redevelopment. We facilitate master planned approaches in order to discourage incremental general plan amendments that introduce or expand business park or industrial development.

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    2. Policy ED-1.6 Industrial redevelopment

      We facilitate and promote redevelopment in the industrial redevelopment focus areas to provide land and facilities for non-mining industrial development.

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  • Policies
    1. Policy HW-2.2 Land use compatibility for schools

      We prioritize the safety and security of public schools in unincorporated areas by minimizing incompatible land uses near instructional facilities. We encourage school districts to place new schools where existing and planned land uses are compatible.

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  • Goals
    1. Goal HZ-1 Natural Environmental Hazards

      Minimized risk of injury, loss of life, property damage, and economic and social disruption caused by natural environmental hazards and adaptation to potential changes in climate

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    Policies
    1. Policy HZ-1.1 New subdivisions in environmental hazard areas

      We require all lots and parcels created through new subdivisions to have sufficient buildable area outside of the following environmental hazard areas:

      • Flood: 100-year flood zone, dam/basin inundation area
      • Geologic: Alquist Priolo earthquake fault zone; County-identified fault zone; rockfall/debris-flow hazard area, existing and County-identified landslide area
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    2. Policy HZ-1.2 New development in environmental hazard areas

      We require all new development to be located outside of the environmental hazard areas listed below. For any lot or parcel that does not have sufficient buildable area outside of such hazard areas, we require adequate mitigation, including designs that allow occupants to shelter in place and to have sufficient time to evacuate during times of extreme weather and natural disasters.

      • Flood: 100-year flood zone, dam/basin inundation area
      • Geologic: Alquist Priolo earthquake fault zone; County-identified fault zone; rockfall/debris-flow hazard area, medium or high liquefaction area (low to high and localized), existing and County-identified landslide area, moderate to high landslide susceptibility area)
      • Fire: high or very high fire hazard severity zone
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    3. Policy HZ-1.3 Floodplain mapping

      We require any new lots or subdivisions partially in, and any new development partially or entirely in 100-year flood zones or 100-year flood awareness areas to provide detail floodplain mapping for 100- and 200-year storm events as part of the development approval process.

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    4. Policy HZ-1.4 500-year flood zone

      We may collaborate with property owners in the Valley region to establish funding and financing mechanisms to mitigate flood hazards in identified 500-year flood zones.

      GO TO POLICY
    5. Policy HZ-1.6 Critical and essential facility location

      We require new critical and essential facilities to be located outside of hazard areas, whenever feasible.

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    6. Policy HZ-1.9 Hazard areas maintained as open space

      We minimize risk associated with flood, geologic, and fire hazard zones or areas by encouraging such areas to be preserved and maintained as open space.

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    7. Policy HZ-2.1 Hazardous waste facilities

      We regulate and buffer hazardous waste facilities to protect public health and avoid impacts on the natural environment.

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    8. Policy HZ-2.3 Safer alternatives

      We minimize the use of hazardous materials by choosing and by encouraging others to use non-toxic alternatives that do not pose a threat to the environment.

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    9. Policy HZ-2.4 Truck routes for hazardous materials

      We designate truck routes for the transportation of hazardous materials through unincorporated areas and prohibit routes that pass through residential neighborhoods to the maximum extent feasible.

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    10. Policy HZ-2.6 Coordination with transportation authorities

      We collaborate with airport owners, FAA, Caltrans, SBCTA, SCAG, neighboring jurisdictions, and other transportation providers in the preparation and maintenance of, and updates to transportation-related plans and projects to minimize noise impacts and provide appropriate mitigation measures.

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    11. Policy HZ-2.7 Truck delivery areas

      We encourage truck delivery areas to be located away from residential properties and require associated noise impacts to be mitigated.

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    12. Policy HZ-2.8 Proximity to noise generating uses

      We limit or restrict new noise sensitive land uses in proximity to existing conforming noise generating uses and planned industrial areas.

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    13. Policy HZ-2.10 Agricultural operations

      We require new development adjacent to existing conforming agricultural operations to provide adequate buffers to reduce the exposure of new development to operational noise, odor, and the storage or application of pesticides or other hazardous materials.

      GO TO POLICY
    14. Policy HZ-3.5 Hazardous waste facilities

      We do not permit new hazardous waste facilities to be developed in unincorporated environmental justice focus areas.

      GO TO POLICY
    15. Policy HZ-3.15 Food access

      We increase access to healthy food in underserved areas by promoting local food production, community gardens, and urban farms in agricultural zoning districts or on vacant or underutilized lands. We also encourage existing and new small grocery or convenience stores to sell fresh foods in underserved areas. We require the County Healthy Communities Program to prioritize environmental justice communities for technical assistance and grant making, and ensure that residents of environmental justice communities are provided educational materials related to food assistance programs, healthy eating habits and food choices.

      GO TO POLICY
    16. Policy HZ- 3.16 Notification

      We notify the public through the County website, mail, and other means when applications are accepted for conditional use permits, changes in zoning, and Policy Plan amendments in or adjacent to environmental justice focus areas. We prepare public notices in the predominant language(s) spoken in the communities containing environmental justice focus areas.

      GO TO POLICY
    17. Policy HZ-3.17 Community stakeholders

      We identify and coordinate with key community stakeholders through advisory committees or other methods to increase public awareness and obtain timely community input concerning potential funding opportunities, conditional use permits, changes in zoning, and amendments to the Policy Plan in or adjacent to environmental justice focus areas.

      GO TO POLICY
    18. Policy HZ-3.18 Application requirements

      In order for a Planning Project Application (excluding Minor Use Permits) to be deemed complete, we require applicants to indicate whether the project is within, adjacent to, or nearby an unincorporated environmental justice focus area and, if so, to:

      • document to the County’s satisfaction how an applicant will address environmental justice concerns potentially created by the project; and
      • present a plan to conduct at least two public meetings for nearby residents, businesses, and property owners to obtain public input for applications involving a change in zoning or the Policy Plan. The County will require additional public outreach if the proposed project changes substantively in use, scale, or intensity from the proposed project presented at previous public outreach meeting(s).
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    19. Policy HZ-3.19 Community education

      We make educational materials available to the public in unincorporated environmental justice focus areas so that they clearly understand the potential for adverse pollution, noise, odor, vibration, and lighting and glare, and the effects of toxic materials to promote civil engagement. We require that such educational materials be developed in accordance with Plain Language Guidelines. We require that this information be made available in public spaces such as libraries and community centers, as well as on County websites and other appropriate means.

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    Related Materials
    1. Policy Maps HZ-9 Airport Safety & Planning (PDF | WEB)
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Grow the community through attracting and maintaining a skilled workforce
      Action Statement B.2

      Collaborate with San Bernardino County Land Use Services to expand the industrial zones in Baker.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
      Action Statement B.6

      Identify and advertise commercial sites to local developers to encourage development of hotel(s) in Baker.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Provide a unified downtown area that is active and thriving
      Action Statement A.6

      Collaborate with the County to establish a consistent/compatible design theme for the downtown/business district areas.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT C - Create affordable outdoor recreation activities that capitalize on the natural environment, attract visitors, and provide entertainment for residents while also reducing the associated impacts to the communities
      Action Statement C.2

      Investigate opportunities to establish designated sledding areas with parking to avoid visitors establishing undesignated sledding and parking areas.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Clean up Dagget
      Action Statement A.3

      Establish a permanent dump site.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Encourage community involvement in civic beautification and maintaining the community’s rural character
      Action Statement B.3

      Encourage safe animal keeping through educational programs and partnerships.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    2. FOCUS STATEMENT C - Improve public and equestrian safety within Muscoy
      Action Statement C.1

      Increase participation in the neighborhood watch program throughout the community.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT E - Improve open space and recreational opportunities for Helendale residents
      Action Statement E.4

      Create a little league park and practice fields.

      GO TO ACTION PLAN
    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Maintain the rural character of the community
      Action Statement A.3

      Partner with organizations and land trusts to protect and conserve Lucerne Valley’s unique natural desert habitats and wildlife corridors, protect public access to locally-, state-, or federally designated open space or resource conservation areas, and to maintain the balance between the human and natural communities to maintain a functioning desert/mountain transitional ecosystem.

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    1. FOCUS STATEMENT B - Reduce the impacts associated with seasonal visitors and tourist activities
      Action Statement B.2

      Investigate opportunities to establish designated sledding areas with parking to avoid visitors establishing undesignated sledding and parking areas.

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      Action Statement B.5

      Advocate with the National Forest Service (NFS) to provide snow play/recreation areas and parking that does not impact the environment.

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    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Preserve and enhance the unique environmental features of the Lake Arrowhead Communities and surrounding areas
      Action Statement A.2

      Identify incentives for landowners to maintain undeveloped property as open space.

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    2. FOCUS STATEMENT F - Improve resources to support seasonal visitors and tourist activities in the Lake Arrowhead communities
      Action Statement F.2

      Investigate opportunities to establish designated sledding areas with parking to avoid visitors establishing quasi-sledding and parking areas.

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    1. FOCUS STATEMENT D - Preserve small alpine community (character, history, aesthetics)
      Action Statement D.1

      Host a property owners meeting, with representatives from San Bernardino County Land Use Services, to discuss local aesthetic qualities including architectural styles, building materials, and paint colors and consider regulation through formation of a Homeowners Association with covenants, codes, and restrictions or adoption of development standards.

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    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Restore, preserve, and enhance the rural characteristics of Homestead Valley
      Action Statement A.2

      Collaborate with San Bernardino County Land Use Services to develop and adopt design guidelines that reflect the unique characteristics of the community, and will lead to residential and nonresidential buildings that are compatible to the architectural style within Homestead Valley.

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    1. FOCUS STATEMENT A - Preserve the historic western themed rural lifestyle
      Action Statement A.6

      Protect residential equestrian uses that are part of the Old West heritage.

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